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47 Rules of Highly Effective Bank Robbers Paperback – July 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 282 pages
  • Publisher: Capital Crime Press (July 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0977627667
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977627660
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,313,922 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Tara and her father have a very unusual relationship: they rob banks together and have been doing so since Tara was a girl. But she is grown up now, and she'd rather do something else--except that dear old Dad, dear old homicidal-maniac Dad, is having some serious separation anxiety. To make matters worse, the duo is on the lam from the cops (and from some nasty former partners in crime), and Tara is developing a crush on a lawman's son. Recommend this intriguing first mystery to readers who enjoy the comic capers novels of Hiaasen, Leonard, and Westlake. David Pitt
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

A stunning debut. Cook's novel will make you think someone transported Carl Hiaasen to the desert Southwest. --Steve Brewer, author of "Bank Job"

Customer Reviews

Nobody is a good guy, or good girl, which is why you love the characters all the more.
Lori L. Lacefield
This is great summer reading that would also be perfect for a long airline flight (but take another book, too, because you'll finish this one so quickly).
Steven Rigolosi
I am a prodigious reader but seldom ever laugh out loud as I did when reading this book.
Voracious Reader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steven Rigolosi on July 14, 2006
Everything you'll read about this book promises a fast-moving caper, and Troy Cook delivers on that promise!

47 Rules of Highly Effective Bank Robbers is both a modern caper (with a highly likable antiheroine) and a classic picaresque "bildungsroman." I was impressed by Troy Cook's ability to blend the old with the new, and to create the bank robbers' world with panache. I was reminded a bit of a favorite old book, "The Great Train Robbery," by Michael Crichton, which also makes thieves so thoroughly likable.

I also appreciated the humor, which was occasionally zany but never forced. I felt as though the comedy was a natural part of Cook's writing style rather than an element forced onto the book. This is great summer reading that would also be perfect for a long airline flight (but take another book, too, because you'll finish this one so quickly).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Cook on February 9, 2006
If you like quirky characters and stupid crooks, you'll love this one. Reads like Christopher Buckley or Bill Fitzhugh.

Wyatt is a psycho dad raising his 9 year old daughter to be a bank robber, using Barbie dolls as visual aids. He develops a system of rules to help them have successful heists, and the rules are wonderfully skewed bits of self-help advice.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 21, 2007
It is always hard when a child's parent chooses a career for him, trains him early and does not allow any other job opportunities. It is an age old problem of parents' deciding what is best for their children with no discussion. But when your father is a psychopathic bank robber it really limits your future plans.

When 9 year old Tara's mother dies, her father begins to train her in his career field, in the art of robbing banks. Her first attempt at intimidating bank guards ends when she misses her shot and shoots her father in the foot. But after that she becomes an accomplished and successful partner with her father for many years of bank heists. But at age 23 she wonders if this is enough, no friends, no permanent place to live and, most of all, no social life. And as her father becomes more and more out of control and shooting innocent people becomes common (in spite of "Rule #16 Change your MO about as often as you change your underwear.") Tara is feeling that maybe it is time for a career change. Scoping out their latest bank job leads Tara and her father to a small, rural Arizona town (Rule #6- Only rob banks in the sticks.) . There Tara meets Max, the wayward son of the local sheriff, and it is instant attraction. After the bank robbing follows the pattern of blood and death, Tara decides it is time to leave her father. But with a unforgiving, psychopathic father, this is not going to be easy. Bonnie and Clyde had it easy compared to these two. Tara and Max flee but followed by Wyatt who is pursued by ex-partners, the sheriff and the FBI.

47 Rules of Highly Effective Bank Robbers is a great, sprawling adventure. With his tongue firmly planted in his cheek, Troy Cook has written a fun, action filled story of a family gone wrong.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By -TMcN- on December 26, 2007
47 Rules is essentially a humorous family-crime novel, following a crime family though some changes. It's a decent read, but not quite as funny as it tries to be. More importantly, it is very violent and has quite a few sets of characters we get to know, in their own story lines, most of whom converge at the end. Very much like Pulp Fiction or Reservoir Dogs. And then the last few pages are wrap-up straight from the ending of a National Lampoon movie, telling us briefly what happened next to each character.

If you have a long weekend to read it straight, so you can keep all the plotlines fresh in your mind, and you don't mind unnecessary viciousness, it's a good enough read. Not great, but has some clever conceits. But the squeamish and anyone looking for a quick light read probably should look elsewhere.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Voracious Reader on February 3, 2007
I loved this book for its originality and humor. I am a prodigious reader but seldom ever laugh out loud as I did when reading this book. I am going to write to the author, something else I seldom do, to tell him how much I enjoyed his debut, and I will recommend this book to all my friends. Others have told you what it's about, but you have to experience it yourself. I loved the characters, even the truly jerky ones. The book is difficult to put down. I hope Troy Cook is rapidly finishing his next book. He is definitely on my watch list of authors to read. I hope you enjoy his quirky and somewhat sexy debut novel as much as I did.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By 8th Frog on July 6, 2006
You ever been on a bus or in a restaurant or waiting in the doctor's office? And you brought a book so your brain wouldn't shrivel and fry from ennui.

The book I brought was 47 RULES and the place I brought it was the waiting room outside the funeral director's office, while my parents made the plans to take care of Grandpa's cremains. This was not the place for snorting, snickering, and otherwise trying to stifle a belly laugh. But Tara and Max kicked my funny bone once too often and I thoroughly embarassed the family. Oh well, that's a teenager's job
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lori L. Lacefield on March 2, 2006
I read the Advanced Readers Copy of this book and loved it! It has the humor of Carl Hiasson and the edge of Elmore Leonard. Nobody is a good guy, or good girl, which is why you love the characters all the more. If you liked the humor in Get Shorty or say, any of the Coen brothers movies, you'll love this book!
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