The Rules of Attraction (Vintage Contemporaries) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Rules of Attraction Paperback


See all 28 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
$9.35 $9.67
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

100 M&T
100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime
Looking for something good to read? Browse our picks for 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, brought to you by the Amazon Book Editors.

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Picador USA
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330536346
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330536349
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (171 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,583,460 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Bret Easton Ellis is the author of five novels and a collection of short stories; his work has been translated into twenty-seven languages. He lives in Los Angeles.

Customer Reviews

The characters all emerge as very interesting people.
Edward Aycock
It's alright, it's written in a similar style to AP, however, there are just too many loose ends at the end of the book.
tawnyuzzi
This book was so dark, but so interesting and fun to read.
Booker

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By "goldrobotboy" on July 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is one of the most gorgeous books I have ever read. Ellis is a smart enough writer not to make it gorgeous in the conventional sense, one where swelling sentences and gushing adjectives are mistaken for beauty. Instead, Ellis uses sheer simplicity and straightforward dialogue to convey just how deeply jaded the characters in the novel are. Every character is longing for something more, but trying to go after it in a self-destructive and obsessive compulsive fashion. It is a dead on accurate portrayal of college life, of the religion of namedropping, gossip, misdirected desire, and the search of a place to belong. The characters are expertly drawn and given voices that have more emotion and chracter in them than those found in most films. It is funny and sad at the same time. When you finish the book, you realize it starts in the middle of a sentence and ends in the middle of a sentence, a subtle yet heartbreaking technique that suggests people have felt this way since the beginning of time and that they always will.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By man_invisible on June 24, 2001
Format: Paperback
After reading every other book in Bret Easton Ellis' backcatalog, I picked up "The Rules of Attraction" expecting more of his overused trademarks: cocaine, sex, vacuous characters. I was really surprised when, in the first few pages, this shaped up to be an incredibly involving novel with some semblance of humanity incorporated into the vacant lives of beautiful college kids searching for love. The story is told through POV segments of various characters, including Sean Bateman (good-looking, hard-drinking, narcissistic), Paul Denton (openly bisexual, provides the novel with genuine morality), and Lauren Hynde (fretting over her boyfriend, who's off in Europe). Their weekly activities of going to parties, getting drunk/high, and getting laid are chronicled in a hell-as-repetition way, with Ellis incorporating bits of stark, unexpected humor that catches the reader off guard. "The Rules of Attraction" flows with a fluid consistency, so that even events that seem to repeat aren't marred by their redundancy and instead seem fresh. What Ellis does--which doesn't happen in many of his novels--is make us sympathetic toward these characters, even though they can be relentlessly egotistical and plain down stupid, we are curious about what their futures hold. It's only in the last 30 or so pages that the novel begins to wear out, with inexplicable motivations and emotions that drift with the consistency of mood swings coming to surface. Despite this, "The Rules of Attraction" is still a damn good novel--one of the best I've read in a while--and it's doubtful Ellis will ever be able to top it.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 35 people found the following review helpful By E. Kim on November 22, 2003
Format: Paperback
Where "Less than Zero" lacked in direction and "American Psycho" lacked in consistancy, "The Rules of Attraction" picks up to pieces to form Bret Easton Ellis' most intriguing and important novel to date. Unlike his other novels, I never once felt the need to question the direction of the plot, I was instead lost in the unique and profound story told by the different views of these college students who attended a liberal arts school in New England. Sure like all Ellis' novels, there's drugs, sex, and a lost sense of identity. But unlike his other novels, "The Rules of Attractions" keeps fresh chapter after chapter. I think it had alot to do with how the book was written, with different commentaries by all the characters in the novel. Sometimes the diiferent perspectives of the characters contridicted the other and miscommunications with the conversations were to say the least, really humorous. This is really a touching, sad, funny, and remarkable novel. I guess there are some people who probably can't stomach Ellis' style of heavy drug use and sex. All I can really say if you are that type of reader is: Deal with it. Rock'n'Roll.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Joshua David on December 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
"The Rules of Attraction" is probably the darkest novel about college ever written, and it is also probably one of the most accurate. For Ellis' characters, and many real college students, college is a time for sex and partying, a 4 year farewell party before entering the responsibility of the 'real world.' Ellis' characters are so filthy rich that responsibility is not a concept they can fathom. To them, college is a formality; another status symbol that they feel defines them. It's just another place to spend their parents' money, with more peers and more party venues. Like all Ellis novels, "The Rules Of Attraction" is grossly underrated and misunderstood. It is a quick but disturbing read that stays with you long after you finish the novel. Another Ellis masterwork.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dave on October 27, 2001
Format: Paperback
Somewhere toward the end of the novel, one of the characters, Paul, gives a nice summation of the plot of the novel: "He (Paul) likes him (Sean). He (Sean) likes her (Lauren). I think she likes someone else, probably me. That's all. No logic."
When love isn't equally requited, it doesn't work out, and we stumble through three complex relationships dealing with this disparity. There is a difference between what we experience and what we percieve from that experience.
Told through the viewpoint of the three main characters (and several minor ones) in monologues, Ellis examines the difference between experience and perception, sometimes going through the same event twice told from different points of view. What we say and what we mean are often different, and these characters bare this.
If the endless drugs and one night stands of Sean and Lauren bother you, watch Paul's story. His thread is the most rewarding, and when he is absent, the novel feels colder. Sean and Lauren stumble through their relationships purposely detached. They don't know what they want from their lives or themselves. Paul is equally confused about his future, but somehow we leave the novel feeling less worry for him.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa17a09cc)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?