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Rumble Fish [VHS]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Matt Dillon, Mickey Rourke, Diane Lane, Dennis Hopper, Diana Scarwid
  • Directors: Francis Ford Coppola
  • Writers: Francis Ford Coppola, S.E. Hinton
  • Producers: Francis Ford Coppola, Doug Claybourne, Fred Roos, Gian-Carlo Coppola, Roman Coppola
  • Format: Black & White, Closed-captioned, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Universal Studios Ho
  • VHS Release Date: October 14, 1997
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (136 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300183297
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #169,855 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

The second of Francis Ford Coppola's films based on the popular juvenile novels of S.E. Hinton (the first being The Outsiders), Rumble Fish split critics into opposite camps: those who admired the film for its heavily stylized indulgence, and those who hated it for the very same reason. Whatever the response, it's clearly the work of a maverick director who isn't afraid to push the limits of his innovative talent. Filmed almost entirely in black and white with an occasional dash of color for symbolic effect, this tale of alienated youth centers on gang leader Rusty James (Matt Dillon) and his band of punk pals. Rusty's got a girlfriend (Diane Lane), an older brother named Motorcycle Boy (Mickey Rourke), and a drunken father (Dennis Hopper) who've all given up trying to straighten him out. He's best at making trouble, and he pursues that skill with an enthusiastic flair that eventually catches up with him. But it's not the whacked-out story here that matters--it's the uninhibited verve of Coppola's visual approach, which includes everything from time-lapse clouds to the kind of smoky streets and alleyways that could only exist in the movies. The supporting cast includes a host of fresh faces who went on to thriving careers, including Nicolas Cage, Christopher Penn, Vincent Spano, Laurence Fishburne, and musician Tom Waits. --Jeff Shannon

Customer Reviews

They resisted the allure of such a dreamy, atmospheric film that works on so many levels.
Cubist
Just think of this : Matt Dillon, Mickey Rourke, Diane Lane, Nicolas Cage, Laurence Fishburne, Dennis Hopper and Tom Waits reunited in one film !
Daniel S.
I encourage anyone who loves this film as much as I do to take another look at it from this perspective and see what else you may find.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 59 people found the following review helpful By John Galvin on April 6, 2005
Format: DVD
There was a time, before and after the "Godfather" Parts I and II, when Francis Ford Coppola was a highly experimental filmmaker who could approach subjects on a smaller, subtler scale that would loom soulfully large in close-up. "Rumblefish", like "The Conversation", is a very good example. It's the story essentially of Rusty James, a 16-year-old living in a tenement in Oklahoma. Despite his youth, he has the vices of a much older man--drinking, smoking, fighting, and womanizing without any interference from what few adults remain in his life. His father is a lawyer, living on welfare, an alcoholic. His mother left when he was too young to remember. And he has only the memory of a legendary brother to give him guidance. Unfortunately Rusty hasn't the reputed intelligence of his mother or father or older brother, and so misunderstands the aura surrounding the legend and the stuff of which it was built. Rusty thinks the great accomplishment of his brother, otherwise known as the "motorcycle boy", was his presiding over a gang at a time when the gangs ran the streets. And he wants desperately to follow in that path. But little by little, his friends, his father, and the returning "motorcycle boy" himself show Rusty that he hasn't the intellect to lead the gang or the soul to be his brother. The "motorcycle boy" is regarded on the streets as royalty in exile. His father sees him as a great miscast figure in a play: as someone able to do anything, but unable to find anything he wants to do. And, in a final dispiriting mission, the "motorcycle boy" tells Rusty that he's wasted his time waiting for his return. He's no one's hero; no one's answer; no one's leader. If you're going to lead a people, you have to have somewhere to go.Read more ›
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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Cubist on June 28, 2004
Format: DVD
Francis Ford Coppola's Rumble Fish was booed by its audience when it debuted at the New York Film Festival and in turn was viciously crucified by North American critics upon general release. They resisted the allure of such a dreamy, atmospheric film that works on so many levels. It is also Coppola's most personal and experimental project--on par with the likes of Apocalypse Now. Rumble Fish curiously remains one of Coppola's often overlooked films. This may be due to the fact that it refuses to conform to mainstream tastes and stubbornly challenges the Hollywood system with its moody black and white cinematography and non-narrative approach.
Rumble Fish curiously remains one of Coppola's often overlooked films. It refuses to conform to mainstream tastes and stubbornly challenges the Hollywood system with its moody black and white cinematography and non-narrative approach.
It was a movie clearly ahead of its time: a stylish masterpiece that is obsessed with the notion of time, loyalty, and family. Perhaps the most distinctive feature of Coppola's film is that it presents a world that refers to the past, present, and future while remaining timeless in nature.
Right from the first image, Rumble Fish is a film that exudes style and ambience. It opens on a beautiful shot of wispy clouds rushing overhead, captured via time lapse photography to the experimental, percussive soundtrack that envelopes the whole film. This creates the feeling of not only time running out, but also a sense of timelessness.
As always, Coppola assembled an impressive ensemble cast for his film.
Read more ›
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 23, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
What makes a five star film? How about a cast starring Matt Dillon, Mikey Rourke, Dennis Hopper (and a cameo appearance by Tom Waits!), a soundtrack by Stewart Copeland (with a bit of Stan Rigeway!), a story by S.E. Hinton, and directed by Fracis Ford Coppola. This film is magic. It is modern impressionism shot in a timeless realm- a blackboard sky. Its more than rouge street kid getting into rumbles, its a story of fish that need to be set free, so they can swim to the ocean where there are no dividing lines. When this movie first came out in the early eighties, it got negative reviews and a cold public welcoming. As you can see here -an almost five star consensus- it was very ahead of its time. This movie probably hit the establishment like a bomb, which at the time was very conservative. All that aside, this is an extraordinary film- a true art piece of the silver screen- livid, bullish, and moving.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. W. Jeeves on September 6, 2005
Format: DVD
The new Special Edition of Francis Ford Coppola's "RUMBLE FISH" is superb! It is awesome even!

SYNOPSIS: Academy Award winner Francis Ford Coppola ("The Godfather" trilogy) directs this unforgettable story of a young man's struggle to live up to his adored brother's reputation in an impoverished industrial town. Matt Dillon (Wild Things, Crash) and Mickey Rourke (Angel Heart, Sin City) are Rusty James and The Motorcycle Boy, and lead an all-star cast including Nicolas Cage (Con Air, Face Off), Dennis Hopper (Speed, Blue Velvet) and Oscar nominee Diane Lane (Unfaithful, Under the Tuscan Sun). This extraordinary adaptation of the best-seller by S.E. Hinton features a Golden Globe-winning score by Stewart Copeland of The Police, and reminds us that if you're going to lead people, you have to have somewhere to go. "Rumble Fish" is a gorgeous shot and realised movie that has attained a lasting cult following. You will either love it or loathe it as it is undoubtedly a movie that polarises audiences. If you want something different and interesting then "Rumble Fish" might just be the movie for you!

PICTURE: The remastered anamorphic picture quality is stunning! It is so detailed and 3 dimensional! The cinematography literally comes alive and you feel you could walk through the screen and be in the movie. On my 55 inch DLP screen this DVD is one of the best looking transfers of an 80's film I have seen and it blows the old DVD releases' picture out of the water. A huge improvement and an allround great picture of a stunning looking film!

SOUND: The sound quality is also superb. The film has obviously had a lot of care taken over it and this all new Dolby Digital 5.1 sound transfer is first rate.
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