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Rumors of Another World: What on Earth Are We Missing? Paperback – August 31, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan (August 31, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310252172
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310252177
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #719,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In a work that is startling and original, Yancey (What's So Amazing About Grace?; The Jesus I Never Knew) writes for people on the "borderlands" of Christian faith: those who may have been scarred by bad church experiences, or those who simply have more doubts and questions than they have faith. Most people, he says, perceive "rumors of another world" while inhabiting this one; they long for something more, and yearn for belief in God's transcendence. We substitute other things for God in order to fill this void. (In a chapter that by itself is worth the price of admission, Yancey claims that our culture's fascination with sex stems from the fact that sex is one of the only transcendent, mysterious experiences remaining in the contemporary West.) The quality of Yancey's writing-and his thinking-are simply superb. He is fond of modern literary giants like Simone Weil, Virginia Woolf and Evelyn Waugh and is apt to defer to the insights of 20th-century poets such as T.S. Eliot and W.H. Auden. He also draws from his understanding of God-in-nature (shades of Annie Dillard here) and from his travels all over the world, using Tasmanian sheep to illustrate a point about human freedom and Costa Rican leatherback turtles to demonstrate "the mixed messages in nature." One particularly powerful chapter discusses the thorny-and unpopular-topics of guilt and repentance. Yancey, one of the Christian market's best writers, shows a marvelous ability to speak to the world outside that market.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

In a work that is startling and original, Yancey (What's So Amazing About Grace?; The Jesus I Never Knew) writes for people on the 'borderlands' of Christian faith: those who may have been scarred by bad church experiences, or those who simply have more doubts and questions than they have faith. Most people, he says, perceive 'rumors of another world' while inhabiting this one; they long for something more, and yearn for belief in God's transcendence. We substitute other things for God in order to fill this void. (In a chapter that by itself is worth the price of admission, Yancey claims that our culture's fascination with sex stems from the fact that sex is one of the only transcendent, mysterious experiences remaining in the contemporary West.) The quality of Yancey's writing---and his thinking---are simply superb. He is fond of modern literary giants like Simone Weil, Virginia Woolf and Evelyn Waugh and is apt to defer to the insights of 20th-century poets such as T.S. Eliot and W.H. Auden. He also draws from his understanding of God-in-nature (shades of Annie Dillard here) and from his travels all over the world, using Tasmanian sheep to illustrate a point about human freedom and Costa Rican leatherback turtles to demonstrate 'the mixed messages in nature.' One particularly powerful chapter discusses the thorny---and unpopular---topics of guilt and repentance. Yancey, one of the Christian market's best writers, shows a marvelous ability to speak to the world outside that market. (Sept. 2) -- Publisher’s Weekly

More About the Author

I worked for 10 years as an Editor and then Publisher for Campus Life magazine. There I learned journalistic skills (there's no tougher audience than teenagers), but every year it seemed I wrote fewer and fewer words. In 1980 my wife Janet and I moved to downtown Chicago where I began a career as a freelance writer. (She has worked as a social worker and hospice chaplain--which gives me plenty of material to write about!) We lived there until 1992, when we moved to the foothills of Colorado. I've written around 20 books, most of them still in print, thankfully. Three of them I coauthored with Dr. Paul Brand, who influenced me more than any single person. My own favorites are "Soul Survivor" and "Reaching for the Invisible God" because both of them forced me to dig deep and get personal. I'm a pilgrim, still "in recovery" from a bad church upbringing, searching for a faith that makes its followers larger and not smaller. I feel overwhelming gratitude that I can make a living writing about the questions that interest me.

Please visit my website at www.philipyancey.com for more information, essays, events, travel notes, and a blog.

There is also an official Facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/PhilipYancey?v=wall

Customer Reviews

This book is very thought provoking, and it is a must read.
H. Fairchild
As with many great writers confronted with the mystery of faith, he often asks more questions than he answers.
FaithfulReader.com
I love the Lord with all my hear and soul and my neighbor as myself.
Autsom

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Michael Erisman on February 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
Reading a Yancey book is always an enjoyable experience for me, because of the conversational tones and quiet and unassuming, yet consistently convicting, insights he reveals. This time around my first impression was that he had missed the mark, a follow up read to finish the book months later gave me an entirely different perspective.
I was originally not impressed with the first several chapters, because while it was insightful as always, it was missing the emotional connection of his previous works, and I felt as though I had "heard this all before". The premise is his delve into the dichotomy of the two worlds Christians live in: one the physical world, a world full of desires, and fleeting and ultimately unimportant wants, and the other a spiritual world where we place our sights on things of immeasurable value from an eternal perspective. Obviously, this is not a new topic, but he looks closely in his usual unique perspective, at the various ways the things we encounter everyday reflect this dichotomy. While interesting, it didn't hit on any emotional cylinders for me, and so I put the book down and moved on without finishing.
Months later, after unpacking from a move, I found the book, and threw it my suitcase to finish on a plane. I picked it up in Chapter 12, where he looks into the life of the famous "Elephant Man". So powerful is the imagery and the contrast between the grotesque outward appearance and horrific treatment he endured and the rich, simple, and deeply loving personality of this man, that the message hit home. How do we "see" that which is real, behind or between the exterior illusions? From then on the book hit wonderful chords and sparked yet again the wonder and soul inspiring visionary impact Yancey is known for.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Eric Wilson TOP 1000 REVIEWER on March 5, 2004
Format: Paperback
In a world full of lust and greed, in a culture fed by media ideals, life seems to be more hurried and confusing. Shouldn't it be the other way around? Shouldn't technology relieve our load? Shouldn't tolerance eradicate war and conflict?
Yancey refuses to back away from life's tough issues. Tackling them from an intellectual perspective, he doesn't offer easy answers. Yancey writes clearly and with well-managed words. He pulls back the curtain to reveal his own weaknesses and struggles. Along the way, he tunes our ears to the hints and rumors of a world to come. He puts thing in perspective. Pointing to the very restlessness of man's soul, Yancey offers hope in the belief of a second reality, a spiritual reality. He suggests that we are caught in a tension between two worlds--the temporal and eternal.
I'm impressed by Yancey's usage of historical snippets and recent research to turn up the volume of these spiritual rumors. Like C.S. Lewis before him, Yancey helps us face the evidence of a God who has created us with a purpose and a destination. Mere Christianity is all about learning to see how this life coincides with the one to come. After reading Yancey, I'm inclined to believe the rumors.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Merri Ferrell on October 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
Philip Yancey has been one of my favorite writers for many years. As I write that sentence, I realize it does not express a fraction of what I mean or feel when describing the profound effect his writings have had on my life. There are many writers who have shaped my intellectual life-literary critics, poets, historians, but Yancey has changed my life. As a Christian who has never found a church or community to share and worship with (most I have encountered have placed a greater emphasis on "family values" and as a single person, I disappear or am viewed with suspicion), I have stumbled along with my faith in relative isolation. And a profession of faith to the general population can precipitate an array of responses, most of which are incredulous. But as my life has moved along, punctuated more recently with great sorrow and profound disappointment, I find a special wisdom in Yancey's work. At a time when I was at a terrible crossroads professionally, Yancey's writing led me to understand and absorb the miracle of forgiving enemies. And with Rumors of Another World, I found myself beginning to understand the degree to which I belonged to God, the beauty and grace that is abundant, the balance between gratitude and recognition of the source of Good and Beauty, without converting those feelings to idolatry. And I came to understand that I had compartmentalized parts of my life I wanted to remain unchanged, leaving little leeway for the "Father's Mansions" to be built in the framework of my soul.
Philip Yancey is a writer who exposes much of his personal inner workings, including his struggles.
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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful By C. Catherwood on October 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
Another book by an author in the CS Lewis and Francis Schaeffer tradition, Yancey is one of the main apologists of our times. Some people find him a little woolly at the edges, then the same could be said of CS Lewis, who was very much from the High Church tradition and not from an Evangelical background. But is the glass half empty or half full? For those of us for whom it is half full, it is great to see a book that gives 21st century people apologetics for the kind of questions that they are asking today. If the Apostle Paul quoted from pagan philosophers and poets on Mars Hill (see the Book of Acts) then we ought at least to understand the language people use in the 21st century - we can do so without in any way compromising our own firm beliefs as Christians. The fact is that, as the Psalmist put it, the "heavens declare the glory of God" and as we progress in the 21st century with all sorts of amazing discoveries, that truth becomes ever more evident! God really is there! We need great apologetics today since the spiritual hunger of today's lost people is as great as it ever was. Let's get going! Christopher Catherwood, author of CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS AND ISLAMIC RAGE (published 2003)
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