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Run DMC

June 1, 1999 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:54
30
2
5:30
30
3
3:12
30
4
3:16
30
5
3:10
30
6
4:53
30
7
5:32
30
8
5:49
30
9
4:21
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 31, 1999
  • Release Date: June 1, 1999
  • Label: Arista
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 39:37
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001DD7VPK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,654 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Bravo VINE VOICE on July 14, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This is one of those rare albums that not only started a true music revolution, but has stood the test of time as one of the greatest albums ever recorded. That is a bold statement, and I don't make it lightly given all the great music (both rap and otherwise) that has been recorded over the last 100 years.
What makes this album so great? Let me see if I can help you understand that.
First, of course, there is the pure genius of innovation. Sure, there was the Sugarhill Gang, and even that Blondie song before "Run-DMC," but they were just preparing the way for the true "Kings of Rock." From the first cut ("Hard Times,") with it's spare, unadorned beats and lyrical flow, in such contrast to the full disco/band rapping of the Sugarhill Gang and others of that time, through the live, powerful guitar of "Rock Box," through the scratching wizardry of "Jam-Master Jay" and "Jay's Game" (an underappreciated mix,) and the urban story songs "It's Like That" and "Wake Up," to the suble comedy of "30 Days," we see innovation in every cut. Before "scratching" and "DJ-ing" became "MTV Beach Party" staples, these guys were doing it/inventing it on the streets of Hollis, Queens. If you listen to any current MTV fare, you can hear straight flow from this album appropriated by such artists as Kid Rock and Everclear; if you ever see kids wearing shell-toe Adidas, you can thank Run-DMC. They started a music revolution and a cultural revolution with this album.
Besides the technical innovations, though, the MESSAGES on the album are as innovative as the flow, and, for me, make this one of the truly great albums.
Read more ›
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tyfoon on January 2, 2000
Format: Audio CD
There were three records that changed hip-hop forever. Those records were Public Enemy's "It Takes A Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back", NWA's "Straight Outta Compton" and Run-DMC's self-entitled debut. The 12-inch "Sucker MC's" was a revolutionary song and a major breakthrough. Before Run-DMC, hip-hop had only been straight party-music, but when "Sucker MC's" arrived, all you heard was two voices and a drum, squashing wack rappers at the spot. Run-DMC was hip-hop's first supergroup, and they were straight ripping it. If there was only three records that deserved 5 stars, then it would be the three mentioned above.
CLASSIC!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By liveon14887 on December 6, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Gold chains, Kangols and leather jackets, Run DMC made it very clear that they were not into the style of space odyssey like Afrika Bambaataa or the street-glam fashion of Grandmaster Flash. Nor did these Hollis crew kids buy into the early hip-hop/rap chemistry that stressed 12-inch singles over full lengthed albums.

Run DMC's Run DMC is easily and simply hip-hop's first classic album. It set the stylistic and musical proocedure for future rap releases. The ruthless but classic Sucker MC's became a shocking revolution during hip-hop's earlier years while Rock Box was the first ever hip-hop track to feature guitars over hip-hop tracks.

Both Run and DMC had ruthless and tough-minded lyrics that were very versatile, whether it was reporting harsh realities of life (Hard Times) or hailing their DJ as the world's best (Jam Master Jay). But this was only the beginning for the three kids, who would soon turn into living legends, in reality and mentally.

R.I.P. Jam Master Jay, your presence is truly missed by the many.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By finulanu on October 1, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Okay, first let me say that I don't even listen to rap. I'm a dorky suburban white kid who spends his spare time chilling to Miles Davis, writing crappy poems, sharing said poems with friends, who show me poems of their own, which are usually much better, and setting those poems to a piano melody. I don't get out much. I couldn't tell Jay-Z from Snoop Dogg. As my entire school learned at Homecoming, I cannot dance, and I cannot get funky. And here I am telling you to buy this as soon as possible. It's just that good! Part of the reason why I like this so much is because it's got rock in it. "Rock Box" and "Hard Times" mix Run and DMC's deft rap skills with blazing riffs. And the just plain rap songs are just as good: "Sucker M.C.'s", loaded with clever rhymes, ties with the socially conscience "It's Like That" (almost an '80s "Inner City Blues") as my favorite rap ever. And DJ Jam-Master Jay provides fascinating rhythms and turntable stuff ("Hollis Crew"; "Jam-Master Jay"; "Jay's Game"). By the way, Jam-Master Jay's murder embodies everything I don't like about the modern hip-hop culture: it's descended into petty record company feuding taken to the extreme, and sadly embodied on many of today's rap hits - part of the reason why I don't really listen to the genre. Dr. Dre's influence was a very bad one. So, right, no more soapboxing. For the record, the late Jam Master played bass, drums, and keyboards on this one - live drums too, not your stupid fake drum-machine crap. I hate drum machines! Except for Prince drum machines, that is. Anyway, a lot of other songs have plenty to say, including the funky, idealistic "Wake Up", an ode to peace that blows the living crap out of today's "gang-banger" hits and is one of the weaker songs on this album. Can you believe that?Read more ›
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