Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $3.03 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Runaway Rice Cake has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 4 images

The Runaway Rice Cake Hardcover – January 1, 2001

4.2 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$14.92
$5.47 $0.40

Lonely Planet Kids
Pop-up Paris
Pop-up New York
Pop-up London
$14.92 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Runaway Rice Cake
  • +
  • Sourdough Man: An Alaska Folktale
  • +
  • The Matzo Ball Boy (Picture Puffin Books)
Total price: $32.86
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Although they have rice flour enough for only one nián-gäo--the Chinese New Year's rice cake--the Chang family is determined to make the best of their holiday treat. But when Momma takes the cake out of the steamer, "something incredible happened--the rice cake came alive!" Stunned, the Changs watch as it pops out of the pan and rolls right out of their kitchen, crying, "Ai yo! I don't think so!" Much like the family in the traditional classic, The Gingerbread Boy, the Changs chase that pastry all through the village, but it eludes them every step--until it runs smack into an old woman. Generous Da, the youngest son, upon discovering that this woman is hungry, too, offers to share the nián-gäo. This leaves nothing for the Chang family's New Year's feast, but their kind-hearted deed reaps them benefits they never imagined from the approving Kitchen God.

Ying Chang Compestine's tale of compassion and generosity teaches a valuable, perennially fresh message. Tungwai Chau's acrylic paintings of the family celebrating their most important holiday are rich with details of traditional Chinese life. A note about the Chinese New Year includes recipes for nián-gäo, the good-luck cake that is said to bring safety and fortune to the entire family all year long. (Ages 5 to 8) --Emilie Coulter

From School Library Journal

K-Gr 4-A tale of tenderness and sharing. It is Chinese New Year's Eve, and the Chang family is preparing to celebrate the holiday. Although they have very little food, they have enough rice flour to make one New Year's rice cake. However, when the ni n-gao is cooked, it comes to life, pops out of the pan, and leads the Changs on a merry chase through the village. The errant cake is finally caught after it collides with an old woman and knocks her to the ground. When the family discovers that she hasn't eaten for several days, the youngest son suggests that they share the cake with her. Their generosity is later rewarded, as several villagers bearing gifts of food arrive at the Chang house. Magically, more and more food appears on the table, until there is enough for everyone to eat. Figurative drawings, while reminiscent of the art in various retellings of "The Gingerbread Boy," have a softer and more whimsical nature. Each page combines a vibrancy of color with more muted background tones. A brief pronunciation guide, along with information about the New Year and two recipes, extends the story. A welcome addition to stories such as Karen Chinn's Sam and the Lucky Money (Lee & Low, 1995) and Leo Politi's classic Moy Moy (Scribner, 1960; o.p.), which highlight other aspects of this holiday.-Tina Hudak, St. Bernard's School, Riverdale, MD

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Interested in the Audiobook Edition?
If you’re the author, publisher, or rights holder of this book, let ACX help you produce the audiobook.Learn more.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 300L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; 1st edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0689829728
  • ISBN-13: 978-0689829727
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.4 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #557,334 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Reviewed by A. Rooney
In the tradition of other great storytellers, Ying Chang Compestine begins her tale, Runaway Rice Cake, with the introducer, "It all happened one Chinese New Year's Eve." Compestine then serves up more than just rice cakes; she gives young readers whimsy, adventure, magic, family fun, language, rhyme, a geography lesson, and an easy-to-handle moral to cap it off. All in the space of 30 beautifully illustrated pages. A father, mother, and three sons in old China are set to enjoy the Chinese New Year. The mother cooks them a special seasonal treat, a rice cake, with the remaining flour in the cupboard. When she pronounces it done, they stand ready to share it. But wait - the nian-gao (rice cake in Chinese) suddenly comes to life and bolts for the door. The boys, with mother and father in tow, chase it through farmyards, markets, a celebration, and the village center. The chase finally ends when the runaway rice cake bumps into a "grandmother," an old woman in the town. She has not eaten for days and Da, the youngest, offers to share the prize cake with her. In her hunger she accidentally devours the whole thing and embarrasses herself in the process. When the family arrives home, villagers have heard of their plight and are waiting with baked buns, dumplings, and oranges, and magically empty bowls are transformed into full ones of noodles, fish, vegetables, and rice. What makes this such a great story is that it arrives in layers: first the tale, then the magic and whimsy, then the language and geography, then the lesson. Young readers are innately curious about children and customs in other lands, but they want the information on kid level. Compestine's book delivers that along with a nice helping of fun.
Read more ›
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Great story to read for storyhour for 3-5-yr.olds. It's the Gingerbread Man on Chinese New Years Day, and the miracle of the Loaves and Fishes, all rolled into one.My storyhour children were totally caught up in the Chang Family's chase of the runaway rice cake all through the village.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on January 10, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The Runaway Rice Cake was a delight to my 6-year-old daughter and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it to her. Since the main story line is a familiar one it was fun for her to draw comparisons to the gingerbread man and the shortbread girl, both tales she has enjoyed in the past. This version of the tale also brings with it a message about sharing. (Makes Mom happy!) At the end of the book there is a page long description of how Chinese New Year is celebrated which was interesting to us both. My daughter was particularly excited about the bonus of two recipes for Nian-Gao. She loves to help in the kitchen and the recipes appear to be simple enough that she can do the measuring and mixing on her own and my contribution should be minor. I give this book a hearty 'Thumbs Up'!
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I like to use this story with my gingerbread man unit because it provides an opportunity to introduce another culture to my Pre-K students and because it has a little different twist. We always make the baked rice cake from the recipe provided in the back and, true to form, this year's class said, "Yuck!" and threw it away. Not to worry - it's the experience that counts! Great book.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I teach 3rd-4th graders with learning disabilities who often also have short attention spans. This book held their interest until the very end. Our class made the recipe for rice cake that is provided in the book. We baked it while I read the story. It is a beautiful story with a nice moral about being unselfish. Illustrations are wonderful too. I loved it and so did the kids. I highly recommend.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
A Kid's Review on October 22, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is mostly about the Chang family and New Years Eve. The Chang family was cooking rice cakes and suddenly, when they
lifted the cover off the rice cake ran away from the fisherman,
a neighboor and the dragon. But they still coudn't get the rice cake. Xavier S.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
A Kid's Review on October 22, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I recommed this book for six year olds. The rice cake ran away because it didn't want to be eaten. Read this book to see what happens. Enjoy!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Though I'm not a big fan of the illustrations in Ying Chang Compestine's The Runaway Rice Cake, I appreciate the message. The Chang family makes one rice cake with the last bit of their rice flour for their whole family of 5 to eat for Chinese New Year. In gingerbread man fashion, the rice cake comes alive and runs away, showing you elements of the New Year celebration as they chase it. When the rice cake runs into a poor and hungry elderly woman, "the rice cake stopped trying to escape" and surrenders itself to be eaten. The children are sad that their last food is gone, but they return home to an abundance, much more than they could have imagined, to their happiest New Year's Eve ever. Some kids might find the anthropomorphized rice cake's surrender to be eaten a bit sad (or disturbing?), but the overall message of giving generously and receiving blessings, sometimes tangible ones right away and sometimes ones we may not recognize so easily, makes this book a worthwhile family read.

See my other reviews of Chinese New Year themed kids' books on my blog - www(dot)myoverthinking(dot)com - look for the post dated January 25, 2012
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Runaway Rice Cake
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: The Runaway Rice Cake