Runnin' Rebel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Runnin' Rebel: Shark Tales of "Extra Benefits", Frank Sinatra and Winning It All Paperback – October 27, 2006


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, October 27, 2006
$7.60 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Life with Harper Lee
Invited to live as her neighbor, Marja Mills offer unprecedented insight into the reclusive author's life in The Mockingbird Next Door. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 194 pages
  • Publisher: Sports Publishing (October 27, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596701552
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596701557
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,086,845 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dan Wetzel is a national sports columnist for Yahoo! Sports. The awardwinning sportswriter, author, and screenwriter has covered all levels of basketball, as well as college football, the NFL, Major League Baseball, and the NHL. He was previously national college basketball columnist for CBS.Sportsline.com and has won numerous national writing awards. He has also been featured in several editions of The Best American Sports Writing and is the co-author of the critically-acclaimed investigative book Sole Influence. Wetzel graduated with a political science degree from the University of Massachusetts.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
28
4 star
6
3 star
2
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 37 customer reviews
This is a Great book and quick read for sports fans and college basketball fans.
Lutherlegend
Tark invited all the coaches to attend one of his practices if we were ever in Vegas during the season.
Hoops Man
Easy to read and you can finish it in a couple of days, but it is tough to put down.
Michael A. Ielpi

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By WildcatWilly on November 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This comes from a person who didn't think much of Tark the Shark. After reading this book, I have a newfound respect for the man. I don't agree with everything he said, but it was as candid a look at college basketball as you are going to find. Some of the stories were downright fascinating and others had me rolling in tears. He not only survived in the jungle that is known as college basketball, but he conquered it. This book really opened my eyes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cam Washington Jr on November 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Wetzel did a great job with this book, the first chapter being a real nice appetizer with the one-liner to finish it off. It then briefly goes through Tark's early life and winds through his collegiate days at Fresno St. After this, there is alot of detail on the junior college days and Long Beach State.

These early sections give real insight into how recruiting was done at that time, especially in regards to race relations. You can really see how much work it took to get a 'have not' like Long Beach St off the ground.

The book continues on with stories of how Tark ended up at UNLV, how his great UNLV teams got built and his epic battle with the NCAA. There are some excellent stories involving Frank Sinatra and a local person going before a gaming commision sprinkled through here.

It winds down with his days in the NBA and Fresno St as well as some details on the NCAA settlement of $2.5 million he received. The book was excellent overall, but these chapters kind of felt like a downer after all the humor early in the book.

There is a small section on how Tark got Anderson Hunt, and his dealings with Perry Watson (now at U. Detroit). I really feel any coach worth his salt needs to pay attention to that story - this is where you see the main reason for Tark's success: it all just comes down to beer and chicken wings.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By William Kennedy on December 17, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I have been a Fresno State team doctor for twenty years and worked with athletes primarily with medical, mental or emotional issues (I am an Internist) and have spent a number of hours with Tark and his team over 7 years, including several appearances in the NCAA tournament. I have been privy to many story telling sessions with Coach Tark as well as intense interactions at the practices and the locker room.

This book may be one of the best Basketball books every written because: (1) Coach Tark does not hide in an Ivory Tower and constantly dwells among supporters, the community and anybody who wants to talk round ball. As a result he probably knows more people in Basketball than anyone. He treats everybody with dignity and respect and is one of the least arrogant people I know. He is more likely to shed tears after a tough loss rather than insults. Consequently he has a mass of stories.

Secondly, his writer and editor are supurb and assure that the stories flow as a tale that should be told.

Finally, he tells it without fear and I assure you the tales I have witnessed and appear in this book are niether embellished or toned down.

Tark tells a story of how a fatherless, destitue first generation imigrant kid can achieve the pinnacle of his profession with hard work, committment, a lot of genius and a strong conviction not to cave into mucky-muck polital correctnes.

Regardless if you see Tark as an American hero or a sketchy coach, I guarantee that if you love basketball, you will sharing this book with your friends.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By The Blue on November 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
It doesn't matter what team you love or which teams you love to hate. "Runnin' Rebel: Shark Tales of "Extra Benefits", Frank Sinatra and Winning It All" is a must-read for all fans of college basketball.

Tarkanian tosses caution to the wind and tells it like it really is. Some of these stories shatter common misconceptions about recruiting and the college game in general. Never before has this been done.

I read the book from cover to cover in just one day - and I'm not even a UNLV fan.

Dan Wetzel hits another home run. I recommend this book to anybody who is a fan of Tarkanian, UNLV or any other team in the nation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sully on October 31, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I wasn't a fan of UNLV or Tark but this is the funniest, wildest, most incredible college hoops book I have ever read. And I've read them all. You don't have to love Tark to love Tark stories. I laughed so hard I cried in just about every chapter. Any sports fan will love this thing, a college hoops fan will devour it.

A behind the curtain look at the game from a one of a kind character. Just hysterical.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Legendary RebelScrub on October 31, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book is a must read for any college basketball fan. Jerry Tarkanian is a real down to earth guy. Dan Wetzel personifies that in this book. I cannot say how much I thoroughly enjoyed this book especially the humorous recruiting stories, coaching and celebrity encounters. I read 20 chapters in 2 days and was captivated by the unwritten allegations about Coach Tark until this book was published. Dan Wetzel through Jerry Tarkanian extinguishes the myth of successes of the Dukes, UCLAs, and the Kentuckys of the world in this book. If you think your favorite college basketball team is squeaky clean, check out what The Tark has to say about it in this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By buddyhead on March 29, 2007
Format: Paperback
Jerry Tarkanian seems to be a decent, likeable guy, evidenced by both his autobiography's narrative voice, and the "shark tales" inside. Tark is laid-back, self-deprecating, funny, and respectful in his tone and delivery, and his life's story shows he could get along with of all kinds of people, and was a valuable friend to have: everyone is a "good guy", with some rare exceptions, and Tark wanted to coach all of the kids and take all the adults out for a meal and a round of drinks.

Tark's larger than life, yet down-home, blue-collar personality developed by rising from a difficult home life (tough Armenian background, father died at 10, little money) to earn a series of coaching successes virtually right out of the gate- the guy never had a losing season at any level, and boasts an overall career record of 988-228 (.813). And coaching basketball was not originally a noble calling for Tark- it instead represented sort of a path of least resistance for an athletic guy whose grades were mediocre and who didn't want a desk job.

Coach's genius lies in recruiting, and most of the book recounts his amusing and clever escapades trying to bring talent to his schools. Tark recognized early on to utilize junior colleges to his advantage, to target niche players, and to embrace black athletes that other schools sadly (and suicidally) avoided during the 1960s. He visited kids and their families at their homes, regardless of how tough the neighborhoods were. He wasn't easily dissuaded by a kid's poor grades or legal troubles, without first assessing his character and potential.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search