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Running from the Deity: A Pip & Flinx Adventure (Adventures of Pip and Flinx) Hardcover – October 25, 2005


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Product Details

  • Series: Adventures of Pip and Flinx
  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey; First Edition edition (October 25, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345461592
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345461599
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,291,775 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the better than average 11th installment of Foster's popular Pip and Flinx series (after 2004's Sliding Scales), the empathetically gifted Flinx and his mini-dragon companion, Pip, go in search of a weapon to use against a powerful enemy. When Flinx's sentient spaceship, Teacher, needs to repair itself, they land on the lovely world of Arrawd, which has the necessary raw materials. There Flinx meets the fisherman Ebbanai and his shrewd wife, Storra, who soon discover that Flinx not only shares their empathic powers but can also miraculously heal the sick residents of Arrawd. Soon enough, Ebbanai and Storra, as well as the local rulers, are exploiting Flinx's gifts for their own monetary gain. By now, the detour on Arrawd has already forced Flinx to defy his mission and his principles. Flinx will have to fight back with Teacher's weaponry and survive a suicide bombing by religious fanatics before the sadder but wiser people of Arrawd will let him go. Meticulous, if sometimes tedious, descriptions render the strange landscapes and characters of Foster's world with believable clarity. A classic alien-contact novel, this recalls the work of the late Hal Clement.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

In his latest adventure, Flinx has landed on a world in the Blight so that his ship can make necessary repairs. Unfortunately, the native Dwarra, whom he is supposed to leave be, spot him, and for the first time he can associate with other sentients without having horrible migraines from the pressure of other minds. When they discover he has nearly magical technology, though, his newfound friends insist he stay and heal the afflicted in their village. Word spreads, and he is swamped by the would-be-healed. The Dwarra begin to view him as a deity, which governments and the religious establishment notice, not entirely with pleasure. The local balance of power is affected, because if one government can get him to work for them, they would have an edge over the others. Trying to leave, Flinx discovers just how much the competing governments want to keep him--under one or another's thumb. As usual, Flinx is well-meaning but prone to not thinking things through. Another entertaining addition to the world of Pip and Flinx. Regina Schroeder
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Alan Dean Foster's work to date includes excursions into hard science-fiction, fantasy, horror, detective, western, historical, and contemporary fiction. He has also written numerous non-fiction articles on film, science, and scuba diving, as well as having produced the novel versions of many films, including such well-known productions as "Star Wars", the first three "Alien" films, "Alien Nation", and "The Chronicles of Riddick". Other works include scripts for talking records, radio, computer games, and the story for the first "Star Trek" movie. His novel "Shadowkeep" was the first ever book adapation of an original computer game. In addition to publication in English his work has been translated into more than fifty languages and has won awards in Spain and Russia. His novel "Cyber Way" won the Southwest Book Award for Fiction in 1990, the first work of science-fiction ever to do so.

Foster's sometimes humorous, occasionally poignant, but always entertaining short fiction has appeared in all the major SF magazines as well as in original anthologies and several "Best of the Year" compendiums. His published oeuvre includes more than 100 books.


Customer Reviews

You can safely give this one a pass and you won't miss anything.
Brent Butler
It is a set of fun characters that teach lessons about conditions that are very human like for an alien race and setting.
Mark Hutchins
This book and the last book I read in this series has pretty much ruined the series for me.
J. Muehe

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on October 25, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Philip "Flinx" Lynx is the result of illegal eugenic experiments that simply proved science needs boundaries as he contains enhanced skills to propel and collect emotions from others. Currently Flinx searches for a missing super-weapon left behind by an extinct race that may prove the only tool to stop a species that threatens mankind from behind the Great Emptiness. However, though the weapon is planet sized Flinx has failed to find it and is forced to land on an uncharted orb when his intelligent spaceship, Teacher, needs emergency repairs.

Flinx meets a backwater race of aliens who like him can emit and receive emotions. He breaks the prime directive of the Commonwealth not to interfere with primitive species especially using technology as Flinx heals the sick and injured. That backfires when the natives begin worshipping Flinx the God which infuriates religious and political leaders. His reputation as the deity crosses national boundaries; other countries prepare to invade to bring God home. While Teacher makes self-repairs, Flinx realizes why the prime directive exists while RUNNING FROM THE DEITY, which happens to be him.

RUNNING FROM THE DEITY, the latest FLINX'S FOLLY is a terrific tale that satirizes classic Star Trek by displaying what happens when a much more advances civilization brings impossible to grasp technology to more primitive societies. Flinx is in rare form trying to do good until he realizes what he has wrought while local leaders do what they always do; manipulate others including the "Deity". Though some readers will be upset that the original mission turns inert, this is an interesting tale as fans will think of The Gods Must Be Crazy in outer space.

Harriet Klausner
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Muehe on February 23, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Another lackluster entry to a once gripping series - that pretty much says it all. This book and the last book I read in this series has pretty much ruined the series for me. Foster used to be one of my must read authors - meaning, if I saw a book by him I bought it no questions asked. I hate it when a good author goes bad.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By John E. Pombrio on November 30, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Pip and Flinx books by Alan Dean Foster are always entertaining. This book follows a couple of others from the series where the main story is really just a "stopover on another world" with a little of the series continuation tacked onto the end. The story is entertaining but does not have really anything to do with the commonwealth. It is a "well meaning man from an advanced civilization lands on a primative world and how he affects the aliens" story. Flinx brings off of the world nothing to help with the galactic threat or answers to his search. Mr Foster may want to concentrate on the series and skip the errant layovers. Good only.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By G. Tenison on July 24, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I reviewed this when it first came out and it looks like my review and some others I recall were "lost". This story stunk. I love this series but the last several installments were very lame. Save your money until he gets back to telling the story we all fell in love with. Tell me about the galactic threat, his growing abilities, his sometime girlfriend...come on man.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Nina M. Osier on January 6, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Flinx, the genetically engineered hero of Alan Dean Foster's longest running series, has just managed to get off a world called Jast alive. Now his starship's artificial intelligence unit, or AI, announces that it's time for an overhaul. The ship can do the work itself, but it has to land somewhere first. Since Flinx doesn't want to risk returning to the Commonwealth, he agrees to set down on another remote planet. Even though he shouldn't, technically speaking, because the world that's about to serve as his shipyard is home to a sentient species that hasn't yet reached the level of technology necessary for space travel.

Of course the Commonwealth has a law very much like Star Trek's prime directive. So if Flinx insists on stopping here, at the very least he's obligated to keep his presence secret from the locals. Of course Flinx doesn't do that. He leaves his grounded ship, thinking he won't encounter anyone - and of course, he does encounter someone. And gets involved, and tries to help the local folk with technology that seems commonplace to him....

I wish we fans of the series might get a bit more advancement of the overarching plot that's been driving the Flinx books from their beginning, in this as in the past few installments. Once again, we have a pretty much self-contained "Flinx lands on a planet and has an adventure" tale. But with that said, it's an entertaining and interesting tale. Foster's gift for creating aliens who are just enough different from us to be believable, yet just enough like us to be sympathetic, operates here in top form. Enjoyable reading for fans who don't get too frustrated by the lack of progress in the series as a whole.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Brent Butler TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 17, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've had to say this about far too many recent Foster novels about Flinx ... this is just a waste of time.

This "Prime Directive Parable" has been better done several times in Star Trek, starting more than 40 years ago.

The alien race introduced is so like humanity in psychology, lifestyle, and culture that one wonders why Foster felt they needed a different physiology.

Once again Foster completely 'forgets' major elements of previous novels. This is at least the 4th time that Flinx has felt 'psychicly at home' with an alien world/species, yet according to Foster it is the first time. (Yes, I can name the other three ... the blind aliens on Longtunnel, the Ulru Ujurrans, and the entire world mind of Midworld). Each time Flinx was tempted to just stay in those places, but now evidently he has completely forgotten all those experiences. LOL

At least for one book we are spared the long wilderness trek where Flinx, on death's door, is saved by extraordinary coincidence.

You can safely give this one a pass and you won't miss anything. If you feel compelled to read it, at least don't waste money on it. Find it in a library or a free download. Alan doesn't deserve to be paid for this, yet one more cheap 'cash in' on the loyalty of his Flinx Fans.
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