Running with the Pack and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.95
  • Save: $7.98 (31%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by monarchbooksusa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good Condition.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Running with the Pack: Thoughts from the Road on Meaning and Mortality Hardcover – November 6, 2013


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.97
$12.44 $7.29

Frequently Bought Together

Running with the Pack: Thoughts from the Road on Meaning and Mortality + The Essential Sheehan: A Lifetime of Running Wisdom from the Legendary Dr. George Sheehan + The Runner's World Cookbook: 150 Ultimate Recipes for Fueling Up and Slimming Down--While Enjoying Every Bite
Price for all three: $53.16

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Pegasus; 1 edition (November 6, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605984779
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605984773
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #112,321 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

The dancing thoughts that appear to philosophy-professor Rowlands during his runs, and the rhythm and value of those runs themselves, make for a meditative read. Rowlands incorporates work by philosophers from Aristotle to Wittgenstein with his own musings, leading to ruminations on topics as diverse as midlife crises, evolution, and the meaning of life, love, and mortality. He recalls his runs on both sides of the Atlantic with various canine companions, including Brenin, featured in his previous book The Philosopher and the Wolf (2009). You don’t need to be a runner to enter the philosophical investigations in this book, although you do have to be willing to follow the author on his rambling, sometimes repetitive, musings. The runs are recalled with clarity, capturing both the agony and exhilaration of the experience, and connect to his thoughts through, for instance, relating the phases of a marathon to certain philosophers. Rowlands, more critical than starry-eyed, still brings deep feeling to his work. Cerebral and heartfelt, this memoir uses one man’s history on the road as a foundation to investigate universal experiences. --Bridget Thoreson

Review

“Rowlands meditates on how running has brought him “in contact with the intrinsic value of life.” In the end, he concludes that, for him, running is not pleasurable in the usual sense but an experience valuable in itself—a “way of being rather than a way of feeling.” A delightful re-creation of a memorable experience with special appeal for runners, pet lovers and the philosophically inclined.” (Kirkus Reviews)

“Life-affirming. Gets straight to the heart of why running has such an important place in our lives. Perfectly captures the essence of what happens when we lace up a pair of sneakers and close the door behind us. Outstanding.” (Robin Harvie, author of The Lure of Long Distances)

“One of the most intense reading experiences of my life. It is a profound and beautiful book.” (Jeffrey Masson, author of When Elephants Weep)

“Delightful and eye-opening.” (Connie Ogle - Miami Herald)

“This year's most original and instructive work of popular philosophy. Rowlands is a rare contemporary philosopher who is able to learn from everything he experiences in life.” (Financial Times)

“A snarly misanthrope, Rowlands recovered his own humanity by loving a noble beast and (with a little help from Aristotle, Descartes, and Jack Daniel's) learning to howl at the moon.” (O, The Oprah Magazine)

“Rarely has a single animal inspired such deep reflections on morality, mortality,and misanthropy.” (Frans de Wall, author of Our Inner Ape)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michael LaBossiere on November 12, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Like Mark Rowlands, I am a runner, a known associate of canines, and a philosopher in Florida. This probably makes me either well qualified as a reviewer or hopelessly biased.

While the book centers on the intrinsic value of running, it also addresses the broader topics of moral value and the meaning of life. While Rowlands references current theories of evolutionary biology, he is engaging in philosophy of the oldest school--the profound and difficult struggle to grasp the Good.

Decisively avoiding the punishing style that often infects contemporary philosophy, Rowlands' well-crafted tale invites the reader into his thoughts and reflections. While Rowlands runs with canines rather than his fellow "big arsed apes" his writing has the pleasant feel of the well-told running story. While the tale covers a span of decades, it is nicely tied together by his account of his first marathon.

Since the book is about running and philosophy, there is the question of whether or not the book is too philosophical for runners and too "runsophical" for philosophers. Fortunately, Rowlands clearly presents the philosophical aspects of the work in a way that steers nicely between the rocks of being too technical for non-philosophers and being too simplistic for philosophers. As such, non-philosophers and philosophers should find the philosophical aspects both comprehensible and interesting.

In regards to the running part, Rowlands takes a similar approach: those who know little of running are provided with the needed context while Rowlands's skill ensures that he still captures the attention of veteran runners. This approach ensures that those poor souls who are unfamiliar with both running and philosophy will still find the book approachable and comprehensible.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By MARIA RACHMANIDOU on May 27, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A book that stimulates the mind to think about life, the meaning of life and philosophical approach of emotions which savors the thinking man. Prompted by the musclular -biological function of the body, logic is being activated and goes into the comparison process , distinguishing the different philosophical interpretations of human existence. Written in a way that touches the emotion but feeds the thought. Something that we need more and more.
I recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading as food for the mind
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Yvonne B on June 10, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The passages about running and running with the pack were incredibly well written and fascinating. I found the philosophical passages a little more challenging ....but we're worth the extra brainpower. I would however have liked to have seen more of a balance - more about actually running with the pack.
The highlights for me were the passages about Brenin and more of these would have made it a five star read. Guess I'll have to read Philosopher and the Wolf for that!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steve Ostrovsky on January 7, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I haven't finished the book yet, but being a runner and owner of many dogs, this is an easy book to digest. You can get lost in some of the philosophy wanderings, but he does a good job getting them tied in to running, canines and all things related.

My favorite part of the book that really hit home was (I'm paraphrasing) "A good long run where you think is not yet a good long run. Thoughts will come on their own once you get into the run". This really resonates with me in more areas than just running, but it's ideas like this that make this book enjoyable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark Matthews on December 12, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This book is rich, deep and meaty. As a fan of anything that can capture the essence of running in words, I dashed into this book. It gave me as much as I could have hoped for.

The author starts the novel at the starting chute of a marathon being "undercooked" having not trained for many weeks. Yet still he is going to run and acknowledges lying to himself about just running a portion to see how he feels. He knows full well he's going to keep going, and we get to hear his mental meanderings along the way.

The author goes back again and again to running for the sake of running and not for the end results of something else. Running is where we find play and remember things we have only known as a child. Getting wrapped up in the run itself is something that makes this life worthwhile.

You won't find the typical "Just Do It,""Run Strong", or some Prefontaine or Sheehan slogans (both of whom I love) that will serve as mantras. What you will find are perhaps some of the deepest critical thinking of running you will ever read. Many parts will stick with me.

I loved his examination of the question "what do I think about when I run" and referred to this material for a blog post. If there is any mantra that the book left me with, it will be the idea that every run has its own heart beat you get lost in, and if you do happen to be thinking too much during a run, that means it has gone bad, or has not yet 'gone right.' 'The Heart-beat of the run' will be tattooed in your memory after reading how the author's descriptions.

I also loved the author pondering his decline of athleticism and mounting running injuries. No trite cliches to offer comfort, just more philosophical discourse on mortality.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search