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Running to the Top Paperback – September 15, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Meyer & Meyer Fachverlag und Buchhandel GmbH; 3rd edition (September 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841263354
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841263359
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #365,075 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The New Zealander Arthur Lydiard was the most successful trainer of middle and long distance running in the world. He coached runners from different countries such as Peter Snell (3 times gold) or Lasse Viren, who reached 4 times gold. In the 50s and 60s Arthur Lydiard not only revolutionized the middle and long distance training but parallel to this development he may be considered as one of the founders of the jogging-movement.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By hillrunr on December 8, 2004
Format: Paperback
To those who say his theories are outdated, show me the results where Americans pounding the intervals or following a Daniels type plan are beating those like the Kenyans and the Japanese marathoners and Paula Radcliffe who train much more like Lydiard suggests. It's not a coincidence that Deena Kastor and Meb Keflezighi became the first two Americans to win Olympic marathon medals in 20 years. They are also two of the few Americans who follow a Lydiard-based training philosophy. The Kenyans do not train at LT pace all the time. Anyone who knows how they train knows that they train much like Lydiard suggests.

Yes, his writings are hard to read. He has a great mind when it comes to running technique but not quite so great when it comes to writing style. However, the wealth of wisdom in his writings is worth working yourself through the less than spectacular writing style if you are interested in racing performance.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
Arthur Lydiard, the legendary coach of the New Zealand track teams, knows running. Want proof? He has coached many Olympic Gold medal winners and many coaches today base their training philosophies on Lydiard. This book is easy to understand and provides clear, realistic work-outs for all levels. Whether you are training for a marathon, 10K, 5K or 800m, this book will get you started. Many of his training ideas from 40 years ago are still used today. This amazing book put his brain on paper. Get this book if you are serious about running or coaching.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By M. Eichenlaub on November 5, 2004
Format: Paperback
My first thoughts were - "This is a book?" This is the most unprofessional job I have ever seen. The forward is one the most laughable English translations I have ever seen printed. As for the body of the text, it is clearly a compilation of various things Lydiard wrote over the years. The editors took all this different stuff, threw it together, and called it a book. The end has some charts sitting around with absolutely no explanation. The book repeats itself a lot, and there is a long section written exclusively about rugby. Apparently Lydiard once adapted his training ideas to rugby, and the resulting article was thrown into the book as a "bonus" or something.

That aside, it is fun to read some old Lydiard stuff. This book takes me way back to the glory days of the running boom, to Frank Shorter and Bill Rodgers running in their heydays, which is funny since I was born in 1984. Always nice to hear that the reason "the negroid" is beating me is that he can lift his knees while leaning forward. Thousands of people have been trying for years to find out why the East Africans are so dominant, and here Lydiard had it all figured out years ago!

Joking aside, this is a decent book about training. Lydiard is not a proponent of Long Slow Distance. He supports Long Steady Distance. His focus on high mileage and basic speed is key. Many well-informed people believe that if Americans would spend more time developing their aerobic bases and less time on the track doing hard intervals, they would run much faster. I have found this to be true in my own running.

One thing I would have liked is a better description of the hill-bounding exercises. Lydiard mentions that you should do bounding exercises up a hill, but he doesn't go into the detail of exactly what this bounding should look like. That's my only true complaint.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
Arthur Lydiard's ideas are "outdated"???? Hardly. Lydiard was responsible for the training that led to world domination by successive waves of New Zealanders, Finns, and Africans. Ingrid Kristiansen's Lydiard-like training enabled her to set a marathon record that stood for 15 years. Peter Snell's 4:54 mile time, 30 years ago, would still place him high in many international competitions. As for <American> runners who criticize Lydiard--to quote Peter Snell, "Where are the results?" The basics of ALL distance training are endurance and aerobic development. Lydiard's advice in this regard remains unexcelled. The Africans train as the New Zealanders under Lydiard did in the 1960s. (They also weigh less than 118 lbs on average, compared to Americans' 130+. Let's see what a 115-lb US runner can do against them on Lydiard's training regime. Then we'll talk about "outdated.") This is a great book. Interested readers can find a modern, better-organized (and better-edited) presentation of Lydiard's ideas in Keith Livingstone's wonderful book, Health Intelligent Training: The Proven Ideas of Arthur Lydiard - gets my vote for best book on running training ever published.
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18 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Jim Kornell on March 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
Criticism of Lydiard based on the idea that he recommended "long slow running" indicates that the reviewer didn't actually try paying attention to what Lydiard wrote. If a three-hour marathoner running his Monday ten-miler at 6:30 pace and his Friday 10-miler at 6:15 pace - not even in base phase, this is in conditioning BEFORE you get to base phase - it that is your idea of "slow" distance, then your idea varies greatly from mine. Go back and read what he says comprises "half-effort" - for a 5:00 miler, Lydiard's version of half-effort is 5:16. If you're going to criticize an author, please read the source document.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a must read for those who believe in true strength training. The training technique that is talked about in this book is something that can be used at any level. A definite must read.
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