Running Wild and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.00
  • Save: $1.92 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: SHIPS DIRECT. Book is sharp with only minor wear. Has a publisher's remainder mark.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Running Wild Paperback – April 30, 1999


See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.08
$6.71 $1.88
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"


Frequently Bought Together

Running Wild + The Baron In The Trees
Price for both: $21.43

Buy the selected items together
  • The Baron In The Trees $11.35

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; Reprint edition (April 30, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374525463
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374525460
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #607,420 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Thirty miles outside of London lies a suburban utopia called Pangbourne Village, an exclusive residential development in which all the houses are new, the security system is impeccable, parents are happy and children are provided with a nonstop roster of structured activity. But fans of Ballard's High Rise , in which he turned an apartment tower into a warring miniature city, will recognize his dim view of fabricated societies. Indeed, in his eerie new novella's first moments, Pangbourne's 32 adults are found murdered, and the complex's 13 children, all but one of them teenagers, have vanished. Written as a police psychiatrist's forensic diary, the story unfolds as an investigation that quickly points to the children themselves as culprits. Though the author sketches a sharp portrait of complacent privilege in Thatcher's England and tells a provocative story with a jolting final twist, the explanation of a carefully coordinated plot among the youths--"in a totally sane society, madness is the only freedom"--is unduly glib. At just over 100 pages, that's really all there is to it; this is, in every sense, a minor work by a major writer.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

'A tight, macabre tale...A well-constructed and superbly written novella. As a malevolent gesture in the direction of facts we prefer to ignore, it provides a salutary chill.' Jonathan Coe, Guardian 'In words as crisp as a well-cut film, Ballard's gripping story shocks middle-class assumptions to the roots.' Mail on Sunday 'Has the impact of a black-and-white television documentary. The writing is elegant, taut and economical, the story gripping.' Sunday Times 'A particularly chilling fable...Ballard in a nutshell.' Nicholas Lezard, Guardian 'Simultaneously a detective novel, a psychological horror novel and a dystopian political novel. "Running Wild" may well be remembered as one of the major political novels of our time.' New York Review of Science Fiction --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By T. Bekken on April 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
J.G.Ballard has a knack for digging into some really nasty subjects, and this book is no exception. The quasi-documentary style creates a truly unpleasant mood throughout the book, and makes it all too credible. Ballard's view of ultra-suburbanism is quite probably the grimmest ever to be published in print, and makes for very scary reading, espscially in the light of student shootouts in American schools or similar incidents reported in the news. Nevertheless, it is necessary to take this book seriously. It raises some extremely important questions about what sort of values adult society presents to its children.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
Amidst the sterile routines of suburban England, Ballard tells a short fable about the loving your children too much. The post-mortem objective style of the massacre's investigator adds to the unsettling tone of this novel. Like Ballard's other works (I've read Crash, War Fever, and the Atrocity Exhibition) he explores the subterranean barbarities latent in our denatured, desensitized urban landscape. This novel is hardly one to advocate nurturing our future generations, since the blank-eyed authoritarianism of suburban child nurturing is blamed for the pscychopathic massacre. Loving a child, doesn't mean that the child is free. And the children, suffocated by parental love, suburbia, and technocracy has two routes: suicide (like 'The Virgin Suicides') or murder. Ballard shows that children are far from innocent: little bundles of joy who are ticking time bombs with artificial smiles and revenge fantasies. A must read for parents and high schoolers everywhere.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 29, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is where you should start off to understand Ballard's later fiction (CRASH, ATROCITY EXHIBITION, HIGH RISE, or anything after the early 1970's). This novella reveals Ballards signature pessimism and facination for the technological landscape: its inherent role in the systematization and categorizing of human behaviour. In RUNNING WILD, Ballard shows the devastating effect when our primal urges rears its ugly head after buried for too long. The novella is set in a self-contained living complex (much like HIGH RISE) where tragedy is struck. Like Freud, Ballard accepts the tragic, barbaric reality of humankind and continually asserts (which he does in his latest, COCAINE NIGHTS) that the primal nature of man will subvert, or altogether revolt against any "civilized" attempt to change it. This novel is depressing and revealing. Read it. It won't take long to finish it and it also won't be long before you become a Ballard fanatic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steven Reynolds on April 18, 2004
Format: Paperback
This short, clinical, unflinching novella about the violent end of a gated community is a perfect introduction to the priceless talents of J. G. Ballard. Adopting the persona of a forensic psychiatrist investigating the mass murder of the occupants of a London residential estate, Ballard explores the dangers inherent in even the most privileged manifestations of social control - the fabricated society is an attempt to lock danger out, but its regime of repression is more likely to lock danger in. You'll solve the mystery of what happened in Pangbourne Village within the first ten pages, but that isn't the point. It's not whodunit that matters, but why. Ballard's epigrammatic summary, when it comes, is slightly trite and hardly does justice to what's come before it: a chilling work of distilled intensity. It isn't the best exploration of Ballard's searing sociological vision, but it's a delicious appetizer. Readers who enjoy this will probably find "High Rise" to their taste, too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jon Arnold on August 14, 2001
Format: Paperback
Although this book is short, it still has a great story that's haunting and very disturbing. Just from what's on the back you get an idea about what happens, yet as Ballard explains it, it doesn't matter WHAT happened it matters WHY it happened. This book also acts as a chilling prophecy of how western society will become. I read this after I read "Crash", by Ballard, but both books are very different and it's hard to believe that they're both by the same author. It won't take long to read, but it'll be something you'll remember.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tensegrity Dan on January 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
Not my favorite J.G. Ballard work, but still quite good. The good is that it is exremely well written and well crafted. The bad is that I found the whole premise and story to be a bit obvious and predictable. Then again I am a freak, so maybe others will find it as shocking as it is intended to be.
It is particularly relevant to American society today, given the current fashion for incessant coddling of children and shielding them from all manner of imagined horrors, whether by media bashing politicians or million moron mom marches.
Read it and weep. We are already there.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jessica Chicago on April 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have actually never read anything by Ballard, and picked this book up on a whim. I can honestly say I am so glad that I did. Although technically an easy read, this book is one you could read several times and still never completely capture. I will definitely pick up more books by Ballard in the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. M. Peterson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 1, 2014
Format: Paperback
Pangbourne Village was an exclusive gated community for affluent families. It was thirty miles west of London. Ten families lived within its cloistered confines. The parents cosseted their children with attention. Scarcely a minute of the children's lives had not been intelligently planned. Moreover, the parents were infinitely patient and understanding and extremely supportive -- doing such things as messaging a boy "Well done, Jeremy!" after he had finished his homework or his lap swimming. But then one June morning the Pangbourne Massacre occurred: all the adults in the community were murdered, including staff and security guards, and all thirteen children, ages eight to seventeen, disappeared. Dr. Richard Greville, psychiatric adviser to the police, was called in after two months had passed and no progress had been made in the investigation of the massacre and presumed kidnapping.

RUNNING WILD is presented as extracts from the "forensic diaries" of Dr. Greville. In his diaries, Greville recounts how he came to his conclusion as to what happened that lethal morning in June. But only one lowly police sergeant agreed with Greville; the Home Office and Scotland Yard dismissed their reconstruction as too unsettling.

The book is moderately entertaining, but in truth it is J.G. Ballard Lite. While it can be read during a short plane flight, it might not stay with you very long. It didn't stay with me from the first time I read it. Recently, while culling my overly large book collection, I came across RUNNING WILD. The only thing I recognized about it was the author. I had no strong reason to keep the book, but given its scant 104 pages I put it aside as reading material for a brief interlude (such as a plane flight).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?