Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $1.47 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Rupert: A Confession has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Librarian Lady
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: unmarked, appears unread, very tight & clean copy * all orders processed the same day * guarantee money back if not satisfied & free shipping on returns
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Rupert: A Confession Hardcover – June 15, 2009


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.48
$3.61 $2.00

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Check out The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
$13.48 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In his first novel published in English, a troubling tale set in an unnamed European city, Dutch poet and editor Pfeijffer skirts a fine line between the literary and the prurient. In a first-person confession to a jury over the course of three hearings, the suave, dissembling narrator Rupert (calling himself alternately Rupert the Rightly, Rub-Off Rupert and Rupert the Unrescuable) delivers a long-winded buildup to what is a sexual crime he may or may not have committed. A habitué of the Sexyland peep show parlor, Rupert falls in love there with a lovely, green-eyed femme fatale named Mira. His worship affects his ability to sustain an erection, and Mira leaves him for a mutual acquaintance, with whom, she assures him, she has a vigorous sexual relationship. Devastated, he takes up his favorite activity, which is observing other people (e.g., stalking), and the street scene he comes upon, whether a figment of his warped imagination or the truth, decides his fate. The author insinuates crisp, titillating description and delights in relaying voyeurism, presenting a deliberate provocation to readers. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Ilja Leonard Pfeijffer is a poet, novelist, and literary critic. He's the only Dutch author to have won both of the most coveted debut poetry and prose prizes in the Netherlands and is the editor of the literary journal De Revisor and founder and editor of the poetry journal Awater.

Michele Hutchison studied at the Universities of East Anglia and Cambridge before taking a job in publishing. She lives in Amsterdam where she works as a translator and editor.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

"The Mermaid's Child" by Jo Baker
In this fantastical novel, the acclaimed author of "Longbourn" brings us the magical story of a young girl in search of her mother - who just might be a mermaid. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 131 pages
  • Publisher: Open Letter; First Edition edition (June 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1934824097
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934824092
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,943,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
60%
4 star
40%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 5 customer reviews
Homer's Ulysses to that of Joyce, to well, Rupert.
las cosas
His only "real" social attachment is his one great love, beautiful Mira, an impossibly idealized woman whom Rupert describes as "the fact the makes fiction possible."
E. L. Fay
Like an expert performer, Rupert maintains a taut suspense by slowly revealing, sometimes consciously and sometimes unconsciously, the important details of his story.
G. Dawson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By las cosas on January 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Rupert is a delusional psycho, exactly the type of person populating our post-everything world. And yet...

Literature is filled with the hero who exists only to fulfill his heroic tasks. To slay the dragon and rescue the maiden, even if, as in Orlando Furioso, the maiden isn't necessarily wild about the whole thing. What counts, what is paramount, is the purity of thought, the shining example of chivalry, of adventure, of quest. Homer's Ulysses to that of Joyce, to well, Rupert.

Throughout much of the book the reader colludes with the author in seeing Rupert's journey or quest, portrayed in three hearings to a jury, as harmless and somewhat prosaic. More Quixote than King Arthur, we readers have a long history of tolerating and cheering on the endless heroes more blinded by windmills than sane adventures. It is harmless literature, it is part of a noble tradition, and why should all our heroes of today be those boring super heroes of Marvel Comics? Hurray for the pure hearted buffoon off to save his heroine.

The language of the first two hearings, and particularly the first, are wonderfully calibrated to this heroic, or at least mock-heroic style. The maiden calls Rupert the Irresistible Virgin-Slayer. But Rupert is actually unable to live outside his heroic fantasies. It is his maiden who must take control, demanding..."And now action. Enough beating about the bush. Is something going to come of this, brave knight?" But unfortunately, no. While his soul pretends to chivalry, his lust is limited to porno and peepshows. With his damsel, he is impotent.

More of the heroic/sleaze juxtaposition in the first hearing.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By G. Dawson on November 17, 2009
Format: Hardcover
4.5 out of 5: In this novel by Ilja Leonard Pfeijffer, we learn immediately that Rupert has been accused of a horrible crime, but we know nothing of the specifics. The novel is structured as a confessional monologue, and Rupert begins his defense for the jury by describing the end of his relationship with Mira, his cherished lover. Emotionally devastated, Rupert wanders the city seeking satisfaction of his desires but finding only memories: "I sought her in vain in the mirrors and found instead the twinkling emptiness of memory and longing."

Like an expert performer, Rupert maintains a taut suspense by slowly revealing, sometimes consciously and sometimes unconsciously, the important details of his story. His monologue is littered with early, subtle signs of his lunacy, such as his explanation of why he's an expert at all martial arts after only "a couple of lessons": "Those born to the Path see through the principles of every martial art and assimilate them into their soul without having to get bogged down in the details of the particular techniques." Delusional, surely, but also quite humorous. As the monologue progresses, the humor subsides, and Rupert's delusions become ever more menacing. Rupert constantly plays with the distinctions between performers and audience, exhibitionists and voyeurs. Eventually, like many violent criminals, Rupert views himself as existing outside of his body and its actions; he becomes "the voyeur of his own exhibitionism."

Pfeijffer's lyrical prose shows heavy influences of Nabokov: "Mira, my sugar-sweet, shimmering Mira, my masochism, my martyrdom, light of my lips, lymph of my cyanic sadness, sea of my swan dive, salt on my howling wounds, wait for me and let me find you.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. L. Fay on August 8, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Ilja Pfeijffer - Dutch poet, novelist, literary critic, and former Ancient Greek scholar - seems to have taken a page from Dean Koontz (i.e. Corky Laputa, Edgler Vess, Junior) and given the villain of his controversial 2002 novella a rather dorky and innocuous-sounding moniker. I wonder if irony was intended. Of course, Rupert is also the protagonist and narrator of "Rupert: A Confession," which is structured as a long-winded and thoroughly self-indulgent speech to a jury over the course of three hearings. Rupert is being tried for a terrible crime (to be revealed at the end) and he firmly believes himself to be innocent. His rambling monologues, however, reveal another, very dark story. The frighteningly brilliant result is best described as pathological poetry.

Pfeijffer also shares with Koontz a love of T.S. Eliot, which was a pleasant surprise because I also love Eliot. But whereas Koontz often uses Eliot's verse to emphasize hope amid horror, Rupert's paraphrases of "The Waste Land" reveal an eerie detachment from humanity and a lack of real empathy for what he perceives to be actors putting on a show for him. His only "real" social attachment is his one great love, beautiful Mira, an impossibly idealized woman whom Rupert describes as "the fact the makes fiction possible." In fact, she's such a feminine paragon she makes him sexually impotent, although that doesn't stop his constant self-aggrandizing. Rupert is the perfect example of the sociopathic narcissist, a man with no concept of how to love a real woman and who must subsequently resort to slimy peepshows and hardcore pornography to get himself off. It comes as no surprise that Mira finally gets fed up and leaves him, which ends up precipitating a brutal and horrifying event that Pfeijffer lays out all too vividly.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Rupert: A Confession
This item: Rupert: A Confession
Price: $14.95 $13.48
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com