Rush: Why We Thrive in the Rat Race and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Rush: Why You Need and Love the Rat Race Hardcover – May 5, 2011


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, May 5, 2011
$0.01 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Rush: Why You Need and Love the Rat Race + New Ideas from Dead Economists: An Introduction to Modern Economic Thought
Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Hudson Street Press (May 5, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594630771
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594630774
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,304,407 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Taking a vacation won't make you happy. Neither will attending a yoga retreat, argues Bucholz, a Harvard economics professor and former White House economic adviser. The quest for happiness has launched a huge industry touting the benefits of a return to a mythical, more relaxing "simpler" time. Bucholz calls its proponents "Edenists," and his book is a sharp rebuke to their message and popularity. Happiness is about activity, he says; stress drives us to perform our best, and competition is endemic to human nature. It leads to innovation and keeps us active, useful, and neurologically fit—he cites studies showing that people frequently show a drop in cognitive abilities after retirement. Though his high-spirited writing sometimes forgoes accuracy for hyperbole, he justifies his contempt for the "happiness industry," and advances his argument for setting ambitious goals for ourselves instead of lapsing into complacency or a "Zen-like sense of calm" with humor and conviction. (May)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review


“Wicked smart.”
(-Neil Cavuto, host of FOX's Your World )


“Surprising, intelligent, and entertaining.”
(-Leonard Mlodinow, author of The Grand Design )


“I found myself nodding so hard... that I almost cricked my neck.”
(-Lucy Kellaway, Financial Times ) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Related Media


Customer Reviews

The author writes badly, with little sustained thought or argumentation.
Siwash
Buchholz combines biology, psychology, evolution, economics, and much more to make this one of the most intelligent, entertaining, and interwoven books of 2011.
VtheG
Most people think a calm, mellow life with lots of meditation and vacationing will fulfill us and make us happy... However, Todd Buchholz proves them wrong!
Carolin Winkler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By J. Strauss on February 4, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The case presented in this book harps over and over again on the very basic, obvious observation that structure, responsibility, accountability and the process of working toward goals are conducive to psychological and even physical health - and the corresponding fact that most people are not happiest with unlimited amounts of leisure time. Duh.

My question for Mr. Buchholz is: Who does he think he's arguing against in making that point?

Yoga instructors? Shrinks? Meditation practitioners? People who preach the virtues of getting 8 hours of sleep per night? None of those professions or philosophies is characterized by advocacy for a life of sloth. Implicit in any such advocacy for things like yoga, power naps, meditation, taking lunch breaks away from your desk, etc is the assumption that for their target audience, the time spent disconnected from the "rat race" will be the exception that proves the rule in terms of how waking time is spent. The target audience for the messages of the "anti-stress industry" is just the type of busy, overcommitted, ambitious person the author should admire. So it's a bit bizarre that he chooses to criticize these industries, whose mission is just to bring a little balance to peoples' lives and/or to reduce DIStress (the kind or arousal that's both physically unhealthy over time and un-conducive to peak performance) - not to eliminate EUstress (the good, motivated kind).
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By CDiddy on October 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Buchholz jumps from tangent to tangent with no real point and it feels like half the book is filler or a bad blog post. When you're quoting from Men's Health magazine and the movie "I Love You Man" as sources to prove your points, it's hard to take you seriously. Other great sources: the Planet of the Apes, I Love Lucy, the guy on YouTube who said "Don't Tase Me Bro", etc.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 35 people found the following review helpful By V on October 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
i was sorely disappointed by "rush" -- an interesting premise ruined by a presumptuous and lazy author. first, the content is pure fluff -- a ton of basic anecdotes without any serious supporting data. second, the writing style is terrible. it reads like a poorly written email. actually, it feels like the author sat down in a single sitting and wrote everything in a pure stream-of-consciousness format. third, the book is mind-numbingly repetitive. the entire thing can be summed up as: "stress and competition can be good for you." but the author goes around in circles saying this over and over again for 240 pages (again, with no real evidence -- and i want to believe the premise!). fourth, the book suffers from a massive number of over-generalizations -- some that can be racially, politically, and culturally insensitive and offensive.

finally, i suggest that potential buyers be careful here in reading some of the other posted reviews. for example, the most "helpful" review was by a reviewer who has only reviewed two books -- both by this author! surprise surprise. half of the five-star reviews sound like the author's friends doing him a favor. i've ordered nearly 100 books on amazon, but have never bothered to post a review. i felt compelled to do so in this case because this "book" was so bad relative to it's strong base of reviews. serious readers beware!
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Siwash on September 24, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Bubblegum for the brain. This is lightweight stuff, written in stacatto bursts of uptempo fluff.

This sounds unduly negative, but it is not. The author writes badly, with little sustained thought or argumentation. This is an excellent style for lightweight USA Today pieces, but doesn't cut the muster with serious and concerned readers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Tina on June 3, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Buchholz's premise is that downtime isn't what makes us happy and that we actually need to be in the rat race. Competing doesn't necessarily mean we are trying to defeat others. There are good things we can strive for, such as gaining more knowledge in a specific area. Self-esteem is achieved when we become successful at something and being engaged is what gives us energy and keeps us from becoming bored.

I chose to review this book because I didn't agree with the title. I don't think we need the rat race and instead believe many of us need more downtime. However, as I read through the book, there were points that made a lot of sense. Competition really is good for many of us. He gave the example of shopping. Who doesn't compare deals to find the most for their money?

Competition can also keep people accountable, such as staff in nonprofit organizations. These groups are raising funds and are competing with each other to show the money is well spent. They need to answer to donors who can make a contribution elsewhere.

While I still don't love the rat race, I do agree that setting goals, striving toward them, and being better at whatever you do is good for people both in and outside the workforce.

Disclaimer: I received this book for free through FSB Associates
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews