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Ryan White: My Own Story (Signet) Mass Market Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Signet
  • Mass Market Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Signet (August 4, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451173228
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451173225
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #238,816 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Although Ryan White was born with hemophilia, the boy and his family were determined that he live as normal a life as possible. But, given contaminated blood in a transfusion, Ryan contracted AIDS. Most Americans are familiar with the ensuing headline-making facts: his school barred his attendance, neighbors and former friends shunned him and his family. Moving from Kokomo, Ind., to friendlier Cicero, Ryan struggled for the right to be educated and treated like any other kid even as he fought a daily battle against AIDS and hemophilia. Until his death in April 1990, Ryan was an eloquent spokesperson for all AIDS patients. This understated, affecting first-person account is no mere saccharine tearjerker about a "victim." Early on, Ryan resolved to be the "first kid with AIDS to speak out, fight back--and win." Hearing Ryan's often strong, sometimes hurting, always faith-filled voice in these pages, readers will know that his hopeful, heroic spirit did ultimately triumph. Illustrated with photographs, the work includes an epilogue on Ryan's final illness and funeral, tributes from friends Elton John and Michael Jackson, Ryan's testimony before the President's Commission on AIDS, answers to frequently asked questions and a final section on AIDS information resources. Ages 12-up.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
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This book made me cry.
Brooke
With great courage, Ryan began to speak out against the misconceptions about AIDS and called for AIDS sufferers to be treated with equality and compassion.
Gavin Ng
Having AIDS can be a really hard thing for someone to deal with.
Aaron Pacentine

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By J. Miller on December 1, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Today is World AIDS Day and each year I remember my childhood friend, Ryan White. His sister and I were both Rollerskaters and skated in the same skating rinks. Knowing Ryan personally and having his book for years now, it is still a story that resonates with me. It is true, thoughtful, and in his own words.

I'll never forget the hatred the spewed from the city of Kokomo against him. It was such a devastating blow to his well being. Not only did he have this death sentence, but the entire town was treating him worse than what you would treat a pig going to slaughter. I am not joking. I remember seeing him at the skating rink one day, it was a time when he wasn't as sick so he was able to be a kid. I went up to him to give him a hug because I hadn't seen him in so long and he said, "You want to hug ME?" He was shocked that someone would want to touch him. That's how bad it was.

Read his book. He is the reason people with AIDS are accepted now. This friend of mine had more courage than anyone I have ever met.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Miranda on December 2, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book 3 years ago as a sopohomore in high school. I had heard the story of Ryan White but never knew it in this much detail. To be honest, throughout the book, my eyes were rarely ever dry. Ryan was so young, yet he was forced to become an adult much sooner than anyone could ever imagine. No matter what everyone else said about him, Ryan always kept his head up. He never lost hope in himself. I remember once in the book he tells his mom I'll beat this thing or I'll die trying. That is what he did. He died trying to beat the dreadful disease. However, good did come of this. Because of Ryan White, new light has been shed on the entire AIDS issue. He was so brave. I do not know of anyone in this world who possesses the same kind of courage that this young man did.
The story of Ryan White will never leave my heart. He is a true inspiration to all of us and will never be forgotten. In the words of Elton's song "Your candle burned out long before your legend ever did."˙
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Pacentine on January 31, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I first read Ryan White's Story last summer of 2002. It was a wonderful book. It really made me think about my own life and I relized that I needed to be thankful for each day the Lord gave me. Having AIDS can be a really hard thing for someone to deal with. But with all the courage that Ryan White had, he did everyting he could to stop it from coming but death took his toll and he died on in April of 1990. We need to remember to help those who "might" have AIDS. Today, fear of AIDS still lurks in the air and even one or two people might get it but if I remember right 1 in 10 people get AIDS. It's sad but it's really true.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robin Orlowski on August 8, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I heard about his story through the 3-2-1 Contact special that first aired and then read the book. Both presented a young boy who went through some amazing odds and suceded in brining AIDS awareness to the national conciousness.
The prose is simple and unscholarly, but this is the beauty of the book, because Ryan was a real human being with real feelings and frustrations. Although some language will ofend the sensitive, it captures the importance of tolerance and education. In addition to fighting the complications of hemophilia and AIDS, he also had to fight sheer uneducation, and a weaker person would have crumbled a lot earlier.
Picked on because of his difference, Ryan was ultimately more saintly than several hollier than thos fundamentalists who either condemed him or patronized him. Although I am fortunate enough not to have hemophilia or HIV/AIDS, I did see a lot of myself in him and needed the obligatory tissues by my side as I read this compelling story.
In the years since, Elton John has dedicated "Candle in the Wind' to many people and it has lost some of it's bestowment awe, but I remain convinced that it rightfully belongs to Ryan White. As for quotes, I believe Michael Jackson said it best: "Good bye Ryan White, you taught us how to stand and fight" People like this do not come a long every day.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 23, 1998
Format: Turtleback
I read this book becasue my friend told me I should. She said I would cry, and I did. Ryan White was a remarkable person. He was born with hemophilia and struggled through much of his short life trying to be a normal kid. Ryan was diagnosed with AIDS at age 13. I am 14 years old, and I know what it is like to be a teenager. The trials and tribulations any normal teen goes through, Ryan went through but he did it with his deadly disease. I am amazed at how much strength and courage he and his family all had. When their own hometown turned their backs on the White family, they moved and built up a whole new life with new friends. Wherever Ryan went, his message also followed and the message is this: NEVER give up on your life. Thank you.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Em on March 19, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"My Own Story" by Ryan White should be required reading for everyone. Everyone should have to read this book.

Ryan White was barely a teenager when he contracted AIDS from tainted blood clotting medications he had to take intravenously as a Hemophylliac. Despite being one the first pediatric AIDS patients, and despite having ever single obstacle imaginable stacked again him, Ryan never gave up hope. He never felt sorry for himself, and he never stopped fighting for what was right.

At the same time, he never makes himself into a martyr. Reading the book is like having a conversation, the tone is fluid and relaxed. He doesn't make himself out to be anything other than what he is - a teenager trying his best to do what's right with the hand he was dealt. He talks about his strengths as well as his shortcomings, the good parts in his life as well as the bad.

At a time when AIDS patients were feared like monsters, Ryan's narrative made people realize "hey, he's just a normal kid like me. This could have been me." What happened to Ryan could have happened to anyone, but I don't think most people would have been to face what Ryan faced with the strength he did.

This book will give you hope. This book will make you think about how you live your life. This book will make you wish we hadn't lost Ryan White.
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