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SENSE AND SENSIBILITY


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Product Details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: SONY PICTURES HOME ENTER
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (916 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000FJGWBW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,135,517 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "SENSE AND SENSIBILITY" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

The acting was great and I thought a very well done movie.
Hope54
The acting is superb, as you'd imagine, with a cast that includes Emma Thompson, Hugh Grant, Kate Winslet, and Alan Rickman.
Scott FS
Jane Austen fans won't be disappointed by the movie version of one of her best books.
artemis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

299 of 313 people found the following review helpful By Themis-Athena on February 10, 2003
Format: DVD
When Emma Thompson was approached with the suggestion to write a screenplay based on Jane Austen's first novel "Sense and Sensibility" (1811), she was somewhat doubtful because, as she explains on the DVD's commentary track, she felt that other Austen works, like the more expressive "Emma" and "Persuasion" or the sardonic "Pride and Prejudice" (already the subject of several adaptations) would have been more suitable. Four years and 14 screenplay drafts later (the first, a 300-page handwritten dramatization of the novel's every scene), "Sense and Sensibility" made its grand entrance into theaters worldwide and mesmerized audiences and critics alike, resulting in an Oscar for Thompson's screenplay and six further nominations (Best Picture, Leading Actress - Thompson -, Supporting Actress - Kate Winslet -, Adapted Screenplay, Cinematography, Score - for 20 minutes' worth of composition - and Costume Design); and double honors as Best Picture and for Thompson's screenplay at the Golden Globes.

More than simple romances, Jane Austen's novels are delicately constructed pieces of social commentary, written from her rural Hampshire's perspective. Mostly confined to life in her father's parish, she was nevertheless well aware of early 19th century England's society at large, and fiercely critical of the loss of morals and decorum she saw in its pre-industrial emergent city life. Moreover, experience and observation had made her acutely aware of the corsets forced onto women in fashion terms as much as by social norms, confining them to inactivity and complete dependency on their families' and their (future) husbands' money.
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152 of 157 people found the following review helpful By Debbie Lee Wesselmann TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 22, 2003
Format: DVD
Emma Thompson's adaptation of Jane Austen's novel and Ang Lee's direction of it prove to be a stunning and talented combination. This story about the complexities of love, society, and family won my heart in the first few minutes with its excellent acting, smart dialogue, and lush period setting.
The movie focuses primarily on the two oldest sisters of the Dashwood family - Elinor (Emma Thompson) and her younger sister Marianne (Kate Winslet.) Elinor is practical and independent-minded, caught between her societal position as a woman and what she wants for herself. In contrast, Marianne is impetuous, artistic, passionate; she pursues her emotions as though nothing else matters. When both sisters fall in love with different men, they react very differently to the awakening of their affections.
The acting in this film could not have been any better. Although critics have complained that Emma Thompson is too old for the part of Elinor, she at once dispels all doubts with her expert performance. She becomes Elinor so thoroughly that it's difficult to imagine another actress tackling this role. As the romantic Marianne, Kate Winslet is charmingly breathless; she captures the essence of her character with seemingly no effort. Hugh Grant is awkwardly sincere as Edward, and the normally sinister Alan Rickman portrays with heartbreaking honesty the love-struck Colonel. To bring all this talent together, Ang Lee provides nuanced direction that captures both the beauty and the humanity of Austen's novel.
On the surface, this is a quiet movie, but underneath the turmoil of life - whether in Austen's time or ours - simmers. Viewers who enjoy character-driven films should love it.
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60 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Caroline P. Hampton on April 30, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This recent movie adaptation of Jane Austin's "Sense and Sensibility" is just marvelous. Emma Thompson's enchanting screenplay is so close to the novel, and that's such a rare treat in a movie version. Yes, Emma Thompson is a bit old for the part of older sister Elinor but, she's so endearing, I'm willing to let it go. The supporting cast is very powerful, with performances by Kate Winslet, Greg Wise, Imogen Stubbs, Alan Rickman, and Hugh Grant toping off a fabulous ensemble. Winslet is especially wonderful as the younger Dashwood sister. She's completely sweet, young and innocent. Her heartbreak at the hands of handsome and dashing Willoughby is extremely powerful and emotional. It's an all around well acted movie. Lots of wondeful performances. This is acutally a very funny movie and so beautifully shot by Director Ang Lee. Every aspect of the movie is wonderful. It's treat for all Austin fans and an all around wonderful film.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Dumb Ox on July 25, 2002
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Jane Austen is a fine writer, but her wordiness tends to drain the life from many of her characters. Thankfully, Emma Thompson recognized the limitations of the novel and adapted her screenplay accordingly, enhancing the humor of the original story and heightening drama to make the film more captivating. A cast was then chosen, made up of very talented thespians, including Miss Thompson herself. Add to that splendid English landscapes, excellent directing, haunting music, and superb cinematography, and what emerges is a modern masterpiece.

This is no movie for action fans; it is far too cerebral and requires a serious attention span. For those who enjoy a good love story well told, this film delivers. The characters are three-dimensional and their dilemmas full of human drama, bound as they are by the morals and manners of the times. Three sisters and their mother are left virtually penniless by the stricture against females inheriting property then in place in English law. The half-brother to the Dashwood women receives it all, but his selfish wife talks him out of helping his stepmother and half-sisters. It is up to the two older girls---sensible Elinor and passionate Marianne---to seek their fortunes in romance while lacking a dowry to help them.

Elinor finds her soulmate in shy, retiring Edward Ferrars, brother of the selfish sister-in-law, a man lacking in the usual Victorian ambitions. Her budding romance is shelved when his sister makes it clear that Elinor is "unsuitable" for Edward. The sisters and their mother then go to stay in a cottage owned by a kindly relative, Sir John, and his mother-in-law, the irrepressible Mrs. Jennings.
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Col. Brandon
Alan Rickman played the role to perfection. My favorite scene is when he brought the barely-conscious and feverish Marianne back to the house. As the door is about to close on him, Marianne says weakly: "Colonel Brandon? Thank you." The look on Rickman's face is nothing short of genius.... Read More
Nov 1, 2007 by Bookworm |  See all 6 posts
Cast
Go to IMDB.com (the Internet Movie Database) and bring up Sense and Sensibility. It will have a complete cast list; you can then click on any actress or actor and be taken to their credits.
Jan 31, 2008 by NHealy |  See all 2 posts
The colonel collapses after carrying in Marianne? Really?!
He probably carried her for a few miles!
Feb 12, 2014 by Harry Potter09 |  See all 2 posts
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