Trade in your item
Get up to a $1.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

STALINGRAD - Dogs, do you want to live forever?

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
DVD
(Jun 15, 2001)
"Please retry"
1
$99.88

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Joachim Hansen, Peter Carsten, Wilhelm Borchert
  • Directors: Frank Wisbar
  • Format: Black & White, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • DVD Release Date: June 15, 2001
  • Run Time: 97 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000646UO
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #207,583 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "STALINGRAD - Dogs, do you want to live forever?" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By M. G Watson VINE VOICE on April 28, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
What is interesting about "Stalingrad: Dogs, do you want to live forever?" (1958) is how much better it is than the color remake "Stalingrad" (1993) made by the producers of "Das Boot."

I saw the latter film first and was deeply disappointed by it. It is an excruciatingly long and depressing antiwar screed choked with post-war self hatred and guilt, and the last hour is almost unwatchable. The producers obviously had a political agenda and carried it out at the expense of such minor things as the historical truth or watchability. I'd rather watch "Born on the Fourth of July" a half-dozen times than sit through "Stalingrad" again.

"Dogs" is a superior film in almost every way, and I would recommend it over the remake despite the outrageous price of $45 bucks (maybe you can get it used). It tells the story of an officer named Wisse who has just recovered from a slight wound and has been assigned as the liason to a Rumanian division north of Stalingrad. Wisse is tough, able, honest, humane and cool-headed under fire, and quickly earns the respect of both his Rumanian allies and his German subordinates. Unfortunately, his timing is bad: it's November, the the Red Army has just launched the offensive which will trap the German Sixth Army inside Stalingrad.

"Dogs" alternates the story of Wisse's struggles with his men's morale, the Russian winter, the Red Army, and his cowardly and devious superior, Col. Linkmann, with scenes from Hitler's headquarters explaining the Fuhrer's "rationale" (if you can call a completely irrational decision by that name) for refusing permission for the Sixth Army to break out. It also details the attempt by von Manstein to relieve the city.
Read more ›
3 Comments 93 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A German war movie of the late fifties recreates the encirclement, agony and destruction of the German VI Army (and part of IV panzer army) in Stalingrad. Very well recreated battle scenarios inside the city and the surroundings of the "kessel". For all those interested in this horrendous battle, a "must see" film. Black and white, German.
Comment 44 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Frank Wisbar weaved this tale on the Stalingrad campaign like a student of the Tolstoy school of thought with its strong emphasis on historical accuracies. Unfortunately, nearly every scene in this movie was melodrama over dramatic creativity.
All the basic facts regarding what had happened at Stalingrad is here; the Romanian(Rumanian as they were called then) division's sucumb to tank fright, the city in ruins, desparate street fights(not so desparate here), the encircling of the German Sixth Army and the 4th Panzer Army's(under General Hoth) failure to reinforced it, the Luftwaffe's inability to resupply 'der Kessel' and their insignificant crates of worthless goods, the Russian winter, the German soldiers' near-starvation diet and their attempt at AWOL by clinging on to JU-52 transport planes, Hitler's indifference to the Sixth Army's doomed fate, General Paulus' unswerving loyalty to the Fuehrer's directives, Paulus' promotion to Field-Marshal hinting of suicide rather than surrender, and the Field-Marshal's last act of defiance to Hitler's orders.
The acting was apathetic as characteristic in most '50s classics. So stiff were the actors' performances, don't even expect to learn the psychology of the German soldier here. But the set design was near perfect, if not a bit under-budgeted. The costume and makeup looked too flush on the depraved Germans, otherwise accurate. The military equipments remained faithful, except for the T-34/85(sans the T-34/76s from newsreel footage) that was featured prominently during the battle scenes. It hasn't been developed yet at the time of Stalingrad. But at least they didn't throw in a surplus Sherman tank in disguise with red paint seared over its white star.
The DVD itself is a dissappointment.
Read more ›
1 Comment 66 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
This gets a 4 star under doubt. [German version]

Frank Wisbar spent the 1930s in the States and most of WWII there too. When he caught up on the theme of WWII in Germany in the late 1950's he did so without the causcious guilt many of his politically tainted countrymen posessed.

Where "Enemy at the Gates" is an embarrassing performance tumpets and bravado, "Stalingrad" a show of German theatrical performance, "Hünde, wollt ihr ewig leben" almost comes down to the level of "I say chaps, Stalingrad is awfully chilly, hm?"...

However, as for sticking to historical facts it scores. It touches in on the German arrogance and prejudice even against her own allies. Anecdotes of how things aren't right are sometimes played down to subtile hints which is almost unusual in German films. Modern German directors, please take notes here...

The relatively low budgets on battle scenes in spite, this is a good movie with a even pace towards the end. If you like the old school war movies and would like to see a German view, this is worth the time. But keep in mind that Wisbar didn't make full use of his material - Read Beevor to catch up on events, and "As far as my feet will carry me"/"So weit die Füsse tragen" (Clemens Forell) about life/dispair in the Soviet POW camps after the war. I recommend the 08/15 series for a movie look at the Germans in WWII. Why on Gods green planet isn't it released on DVD to an English language audience?

PS: the German villain is well played by Wolgang Preiss. Oddly enough, as the battle of Stalingrad begun he enjoyed his fame in the role as a dashing nazi pilot hero in "Die Grosse Liebe" (1942).
1 Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews




What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video