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STAR TREK DEEP SPACE NINE WARPED Audio, Cassette – Audiobook, March 1, 1995


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Audio, Cassette, Audiobook, March 1, 1995
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Product Details

  • Series: Star Trek Deep Space Nine
  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Audioworks (March 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671521209
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671521202
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,989,413 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Although Warped is the 11th volume in the best-selling "Deep Space NineR" series, it is the first to appear in hardcover. The plot concerns series regular Commander Sisko, who searches for the inventor of an evil technology.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Publisher

Political tensions on Bajor are once again on the rise, and the various factions may soon come to open conflict. In addition, a series of murders has shaken everyone on board the station. While Security Chief Odo investiages the murders, Commander Sisko finds himself butting up against a new religious faction that plans to take over Bajor and force the Federation to leave Deep Space NineTM.

Odo traces the murders to a bizarre and dangerous new form of holosuite technology, a technology that turns its users into insane killers, and now threatens Sisko's son, Jake. As the situation on Bajor deteriorates, Sisko learns that the political conflict and the new holosuites are connected, and part of the plan of a dangerous madman. END


More About the Author

K. W. Jeter is an American science fiction and thriller author known for his literary writing style, dark themes, and complex, paranoid characters. His latest novels are THE KINGDOM OF SHADOWS, set in the sinister & glamorous world of the film industry of the Third Reich, and the Kim Oh Thriller series -- KIM OH 1: REAL DANGEROUS GIRL, KIM OH 2: REAL DANGEROUS JOB and KIM OH 3: REAL DANGEROUS PEOPLE, with more to come.

Jeter is an exhilarating writer who always seems to have another rabbit to pull out of his hat.
-- The New York Times Book Review

Brain-burning intensity . . .
-- Village Voice

Customer Reviews

The story line just couldn't hold my interest.
wgilbert@ix.netcom.com
Overall, I'd have to say I am glad I read this book from a completionist's point of view, and for some of the Kai Opaka elements, but I do not highly recommend it.
Bernard R. Assaf
After you read it you are not really sure what actually happened, it just seems to go away like a bad dream.
Charles Ashbacher

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By K. Wyatt on November 2, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a general rule I do not normally like to completely run an author's work into the ground, so in this case my intent is to be as fair as possible with reference to this title. It was not thoroughly surprising to see "Warped" be the second and final Star Trek novel by KW Jeter, who I know to be a very popular author in other genres. Between this and his first DS9 novel "Bloodletter," an astute fan of the series can quickly catch on that the author just didn't seem to grasp the characters or the overall theme of the series very well.
Although no one but those at Pocket Books can say for certain, I believe that the reason that this was the only hardback Star Trek Deep Space Nine release up until DS9's "Unity," which is due out this year, is because "Warped" did so poorly in sales due to it's slow pace and lack of familiarity to the actual series. I find this to be a sad fact as well, considering the novels that came out later that so richly deserved a hardback release!
The cover art for this novel is standard fare for the time it was published, not exceptionally imaginative.
The premise:
Attempting to capitalize on the outstanding second season trilogy episodes of "The Homecoming," "The Circle" and "The Siege," the author brings into play these aspects, playing on the political strife in the newly formed Bajoran provisional government. A series of murders occurs on the station and Commander Sisko finds himself dealing with a new religious faction that wishes to force the Federation away from Bajor.
Odo soon traces the mysterious murders on the station to a dangerous new form of holosuite technology which has also affected Commander Sisko's son, Jake.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brian D Wall on April 21, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've a lot of Trek books. Some were very good, some I've wondered how they got published, and some are average. This one is slightly above average. Usual Trek technobabble when characters are discussing the innerworking some gizmo, and some great interaction between favorite pairs of characters, here in the case Odo and Quark. But nothing new really new or exceptional (except for the idea of holosuites that shoot data straight into the user's brain), but on the other hand the characters didn't say or do anything that most Trek fans would find uncharacteristic. If you're a Trek fan, Warped is good way to spend an evening.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 6, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book definitely ranks with others in what I like to call the "Star Trek Horror" subgenre. Other books in this unusual subgenre include Bloodthirst, "Dark Mirror" by Diane Duane, and "Q Squared" by Peter David. I especially liked the scenes of interaction between Sisko and Kai Opaka's "ghost," or whatever she was--a great foreshadowing of the DS9 finale story ABC is showing right now! Kudos to Jeter and others for showing us that Star Trek doesn't have to be atheistic to be true to Gene Roddenberry's vision!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 13, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's the worst StarTrek book I've ever read
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Edwin Kivi on January 15, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
'Warped' by K. W. Jeter

Let me start out by saying that I have read all 97 numbered Star Trek novels; all 64(!) numbered Star Trek: The Next Generation novels; all 27(!) of the numbered Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novels; all 21 of the numbered Star Trek: Voyager novels; and all of the Enterprise novels; also, most of the unnumbered Star Trek related novels (the spin-offs such as Titan, Typhon Pact, New Frontier, etc.), so I am by no means a novice regarding Star Trek ... Gene Roddenberry's contribution to fandom. (see Notes:)

Well-written novels based upon the five (so far) Star Trek television series infuse in me an image of the person speaking. Even non-canon characters are well-developed, so that the reader can 'visualize' the speaker. Another characteristic of a well-written novel is that the premise is feasible and believable. This novel, IMHO, has none of these attributes. Not once did I visualize the speaker as I read on. The problem to be faced was improbable to the point of being unbelievable. And the solution (conclusion?) was totally unsatisfactory. The author's other novels apparently dwell on the demonical and fantasy (read 'gory') worlds (see 'Bloodletter'), so lovers of horror fiction will undoubtedly vigorously disagree with my assessment of the writer's skills. Fans of Star Trek and relatively science-based fiction will find this an extremely tough go ... it took me almost a month to wade through it (and I usually read most Star Trek and Star Wars novels in under a day). Horror/fantasy readers likely rate this one high; if there were a zero rating, that is what I would give this one.
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Format: Hardcover
I had been aware of the prevailing opinion of this book, which is along the lines of "This book is why the DS9 Hardcover series ended after one book." When I picked it up used a few years back, I was not motivated to read it right away for that very reason. But in my grand tour of reading all the Star Trek hardcover novels, this book finally came due. So I read it. I must say, I honestly agree with the opinion. The book was Dickensesque in verbosity, but while that worked for Charles Dickens it didn't work for K.W. Jeter.

I had previously read Jeter's N-Vector comic, set at the beginning of the DS9 re-launch era, which mostly due to the art was rather bizarre. But I didn't think the story line was so bad. And I had previously read Jeter's Star Wars Bounty Hunter Wars, which I did enjoy. With Warped I'm realizing that the story of N-Vector was a veiled rehash of the idea from Warped--an evil parallel-station/city/universe plot. This book presented a very simple conflict, which due to technologically vague explanations seemed more trivial to me than the story made it out to be. And as seems to be the case for many dramas, if the characters would just be honest with one another with their actions, intended actions, or thoughts, instead of sneaking around doing things on their own, the central conflict could have been avoided. Of course, that would make for a bland story, but conflicts that go unstemmed due to the poor actions of the main characters, when they are supposed to be the heroes, not the anti-heroes, aren't as enjoyable to me. Additionally, the resolution was very much a deus ex..., hinging on the central plot of the DS9 mythos, that of Sisko's connection to the Prophets.

Overall, I'd have to say I am glad I read this book from a completionist's point of view, and for some of the Kai Opaka elements, but I do not highly recommend it.
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