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Sabbath Roots : The African Connection Paperback – May 14, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 234 pages
  • Publisher: General Conference of Seventh Day (May 14, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578470560
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578470563
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #525,309 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Black Africans have a unique proclivity toward accepting the seventh-day Sabbath. Historically, Ethiopia, and many other parts of black Africa have been bastions of Sabbatarianism. Their isolation, for centuries, from the corrupting influence of Rome has allowed Africans to maintain much spiritual independence. Today, Christianity in general, and Sabbath-keeping in particular, is exploding in sub-Saharan Africa.

Ethiopia (Abyssinia) is a nation defined throughout its existence by its fidelity to the seventh-day Sabbath. Today, the numbers of Sabbath-keepers are exploding in Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Gabon, Congo, and elsewhere.

Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford, is not just a book for black people, but for all of Gods children. We all have, or should have, Sabbath Roots in Africa. -- Giving & Sharing Newsletter

About the Author

Charles E. Bradford is a much-loved preacher, pastor, administrator in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. HIs dynamic pulpit ministry, clear thinking, and moral fearlessness have endeared him to congregations in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Dallas, Texas; and New York City. For 11 years he served as President of the North American Division of the Seventh-day Adventists, the first African-American to hold that post.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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I encourage anyone interested in African History or religious history to read the book.
The Queen of Kings
Bradford does a great job showing how African Christians are heartfelt and hearty in their beliefs.
Joseph J. Slevin
Was needed for class and was much cheaper than most places I checked so yes it met my expectations.
Janice McKinney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By The Queen of Kings on September 10, 2006
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I received my BA in African/African American Studies and am very interested in religious history, so I was very interested to read this book. While the book contains EXCELLENT information regarding the Sabbath in Africa and gives excellent quotes from African leaders regarding the Sabbath, I found it a bit "academic" and hard to stay focused at times.

I encourage anyone interested in African History or religious history to read the book. Just be advised, it reads more like a book can be a bit "thick" to read at times.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Michael Nace on January 31, 2008
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This book treats in depth the subject of the Early Church [first 300 years] in Northern Africa, the theological division between the East and the West, and the seventh Day as the valid Sabbath day. Rarely have I seen such in depth scholarship on this topic. Regardless of your theological persuasion, this book will speak to you about re-examining your beliefs in light of the entire Biblical revelation, particularly in light of the Early Church in North Africa and it's faithful adherence to the Biblical seventh Day as the rest day. Particularly interesting is the provocative theme of Early Christianity leaving it's Jewish roots, begging the Question "Where do we go after that (as a church?)". The answer is not an easy one. I wonder if this historical development was part of the Apostle Paul's admonition to the primitive church believers of what was coming in his 2 Thessalonians 2:7 reference?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Yobachi1844 on September 17, 2012
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I thoroughly enjoyed this book and found it to be very informative. It demonstrated first of all the African/African diaspora's deep commitment to the "One God" -- though He is known by many different names among the Africans. Secondly this book demonstrated the deep commitment to the seventh day Sabbath among Africans of various religious traditions. Mr. Bradford did not focus just on the "Christian" Sabbath keepers on continental Africa, but he also elaborated on the "Judean" Sabbath keepers like the Falasha and Lemba (and other groups as well).
Mr. Bradford also mentions a passage in the Koran that supposedly mentions the Sabbath, namely Sura 39 and Ayats: 64-67 "You have surely known the end of those from amongst you who transgressed in the matter of the Sabbath...". Either he gave the wrong reference or the passage doesn't exist. There were a couple of other Koran references that didn't quite line up, but other than that this was an excellent read and I recommend the book.

Yobachi
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Joseph J. Slevin VINE VOICE on March 15, 2003
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Sabbath keeping in Africa has a rich history. There is old history and new. The interesting area is that of the Ethiopian Sabbath keepers who were constantly persecuted. From the early church starting with the Ethiopian Eunich to today with the many Adventist and Church of God groups Sabbath keepers have a heart and desire to keep that day in spite of hardship.
Bradford does a great job showing how African Christians are heartfelt and hearty in their beliefs. These Christians already struggle in the lands they live in, yet, the Sabbath communities are very united and strong.
With the growth of the Sabbath church of God groups, Bradford should expand his research using this as a jump off point to show how Adventist, church of God and Wesleyans have a common starting point.
This book is a good read for any Sabbatarian wishing to learn about the Sabbath keepers in Africa. Not much is mentioned about earlier Sabbath history, like the Sabbatarians of Ethiopia. For Christian Sabbath keepers, it is nice to learn that the Sabbath has been kept in Africa for more than 100 years. Charles Bradford does an admirable job of piecing together the non-adventist history and honors other groups in addition to the adventists.
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