Sackett's Land (Sacketts Book 1) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sackett's Land (Louis L'Amour Collection) Imitation Leather – January 1, 1982


See all 42 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Imitation Leather
"Please retry"
$23.38 $5.99
--This text refers to the Audio CD edition.


Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Son of a feared fighting man, Barnabas Sackett inherited his father's fiery temper, sense of justice and warrior skills. Declared an outlaw in his native England, Barnabas set his daring sights on the opportunities of the New World. The ruthless piracy of the open seas and the unknown dangers of the savage American wilderness lay before him. And so did the thrill of discovery and the chance to establish a bold new future if he survived. --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

From the Inside Flap

They are the unforgettable pioneer family created by master storyteller Louis L'Amour to bring to vivid life the spirit and adventure of the American frontier: the Sacketts, men and women who challenged the untamed wilderness with their dreams and their courage. From generation to generation they pushed ever westward with a restless, wandering urge, a kinship with the free, wild places and a fierce independence. The Sacketts always stood tall and, true to their strong family pride, they would unite to take on any and all challenges, no matter how overwhelming the odds. Each Sackett novel is a complete, exciting historical adventure, and as a group, Louis L'Amour's The Sacketts form an epic story of the building of our mighty nation, a saga that has thrilled millions. And now, for the very first time, The Sacketts are presented in an exclusive audio series that listeners will cherish for years to come.

Son of a feared fighting man, Barnabas Sackett inherited his father's fiery temper, sense of justice and warrior skills. Declared an outlaw in his native England, Barnabas set his daring sights on the opportunities of the New World. The ruthless piracy of the open seas and the unknown dangers of the savage American wilderness lay before him. And so did the thrill of discovery and the chance to establish a bold new future if he survived.

John Curless, a veteran of the Broadway, Off-Broadway and London stages as well as American and British regional theater, has performed in the Broadway productions of The Sound of Music, The King and I and A Small Family Business. He has also made numerous appearances on television including the BBC presentations of Richard II and A Winter' Tale, and guest appearances on such shows as NYPD Blue. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Imitation Leather: 162 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (January 1, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553062123
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553062120
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (127 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #726,735 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

"I think of myself in the oral tradition--as a troubadour, a village tale-teller, the man in the shadows of a campfire. That's the way I'd like to be remembered--as a storyteller. A good storyteller."

It is doubtful that any author could be as at home in the world re-created in his novels as Louis Dearborn L'Amour. Not only could he physically fill the boots of the rugged characters he wrote about, but he literally "walked the land my characters walk." His personal experiences as well as his lifelong devotion to historical research combined to give Mr. L'Amour the unique knowledge and understanding of people, events, and the challenge of the American frontier that became the hallmarks of his popularity.

Of French-Irish descent, Mr. L'Amour could trace his own in North America back to the early 1600s and follow their steady progression westward, "always on the frontier." As a boy growing up in Jamestown, North Dakota, he absorbed all he could about his family's frontier heritage, including the story of his great-grandfather who was scalped by Sioux warriors.

Spurred by an eager curiosity and desire to broaden his horizons, Mr. L'Amour left home at the age of fifteen and enjoyed a wide variety of jobs, including seaman, lumberjack, elephant handler, skinner of dead cattle, and miner, and was an officer in the transportation corps during World War II. During his "yondering" days he also circled the world on a freighter, sailed a dhow on the Red Sea, was shipwrecked in the West Indies and stranded in the Mojave Desert. He won fifty-one of fifty-nine fights as a professional boxer and worked as a journalist and lecturer. He was a voracious reader and collector of rare books. His personal library contained 17,000 volumes.

Mr. L'Amour "wanted to write almost from the time I could talk." After developing a widespread following for his many frontiers and adventure stories written for fiction magazines, Mr. L'Amour published his first full length novel, Hondo, in the United States in 1953. Every one of his more than 120 books is in print; there are more than 300 million copies of his books in print worldwide, making him one of the bestselling authors in modern literary history. His books have been translated into twenty languages, and more than forty-five of his novels and stories have been made into feature films and television movies.

The recipient of many great honor and awards, in 1983 Mr. L'Amour became the first novelist to ever to be awarded the Congressional Gold Medal by the United States Congress in honor of his life's work. In 1984 he was also awarded the Medal of Freedom by President Reagan.

Louis L'Amour died on June 10, 1988. His wife, Kathy, and their two children, Beau and Angelique, carry the L'Amour publishing tradition forward with new books written by the author during his lifetime to be published by Bantam.

Customer Reviews

I also listened to the audio tapes and they are great.
Rick Walsh
It is another wonderful book written by the great western author of all times LOUIS L'AMOUR.
Michael toomey
I really enjoyed reading this book, it was gripping from the very beginning.
H. C. Hill

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Craig Clarke VINE VOICE on December 20, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In Sackett's Land, we meet the first ancestor of the future Sackett clan to be immortalized in narrative. Englishman Barnabas Sackett gets in a bit of trouble in his homeland and sets off to the West to make a new home.
This is really what L'Amour is all about, not "the West," per se, but "the Frontier." Discovery of new lands and finding a life in the wide open spaces. Sackett sails over the ocean and lands in what will become America. His trials and struggles make for highly interesting reading and L'Amour's sense for detail gives one a true feeling for what it must have been like back then.
The most compelling of the series, and fine introduction to the First Family of frontier fiction.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By OAKSHAMAN VINE VOICE on November 13, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While I believe that I have read most of the Sackett novels, this first one was always my favorite. It is definately the most unusual of the series, indeed, of anything that I've read by Louis L'Amour.
Set in 1599, it is the story of Barnabas Sackett, founder of the Sackett clan in the New World. The Sacketts were fenmen (swamp men) eeking out an existance farming the little good land available to them, fishing for eels, smuggling, or going off to fight in the wars. It was the combination of the chance finding of a cache of Roman gold, along with a fight with an arrogant aristocrat, that put young Barnabas on the road to "adventure."
Fleeing to London, he meets the contacts that he will need to set sail for a new world and a new life. The sword fights, pirates, and sea battles that follow are not what you expect in a "western", but they are quite good never-the-less. Upon surviving to reach America (after Roanoke, but before Jamestown) Barnabas rapidly sizes up the territory and the inhabitants and resolves to start his family there- far from kings and aristocrats. When he hears of the "far blue mountains" from the Indians that he is trading with, he makes up his mind to one day travel to them- and beyond.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Mary A. Phillips on June 25, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
No matter where you started with the Sackett books, go ahead and read this one now. For fans of L'Amour's work, especially The Walking Drum, you will be pleased.

Sackett's Land is a good and appropriate beginning for the entire saga. It may well stimulate you to read the whole history in order.

The book is important for yet another reason. It's style and depth are a window to what The Walking Drum has in store for you. Sackett's Land hints at what L'Amour was capable of beyond the pulp western market.

When we pick up a Louis L'Amour book of the standard pulp market size, we have a set of expectations. Good and evil will be clearly recognizable. Good will prevail. The story will be enjoyable and just instructive enough to make us feel that we grew from reading the book. Sackett's Land fulfills all these expectations.

Sackett's Land also holds an interesting place in popular literature. It is representation of a specific family (along with fellow travelers through life) and that family's initial transcontinental encounters. As one reads it, one is reminded of Edgar Rice Burroughs's stories of Lord Greystoke. In fact, as I was mentally remarking that Sackett's Land reminded me of Tarzan (books 1 and 2), I turned the page to find our protagonist marooned on the new continent. In this case, the new continent was the North America, not Africa, but the similarity was fun to notice.

Louis L'Amour was a man of his time, and while he could tap into Burrough's storytelling rhythms at times, L'Amour was ever more interested in depicting people as people, and a great respecter of human diversity. I believe descendants today of American Indians and Europeans can read Sackett's Land and enjoy thinking about their own American families.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Daniel R. Baker on November 21, 2008
Format: Audio CD
The great-granddaddy of all the Sacketts, Barnabas, from the English fenlands, embarks on his first great adventure to America, in the process running into a variety of colorful allies and dastardly villains.

It's a fun, fast-paced book, but a long way from L'Amour's best. Unlike in his superior swashbuckler, "Fair Blows the Wind," the author never quite inhabits his hero's world; it always sounds like the commentary of an outsider rather than the words of somebody who really lived in England in 1599. In particular, large passages of dialogue are aimed at countering modern-day doubts of the rightness of frontier settlement; these passages are persuasive enough in themselves, but obviously anachronistic.

As other reviewers have pointed out, Barnabas's ability to establish instant loyalty in every good guy he meets is preposterous, and his training from his father with the aristocratic sword, as opposed to the ordinary fen-man's bill-hook or pike, is highly questionable. Also, Barnabas's villainous opponents aren't his equals and don't inspire much dread.

The real delight of the audio book, though, is John Curless's reading. His narrative accent is pitch-perfect, and he gives every character an easily recognizable voice of his own that adds a wallop of flavor to the bland stew of this book. Best of all is Curless's reading of the supercilious London merchant and the growling rasp of the pirate Captain Bardle.

Don't read this book. Listen to it. It's worthwhile for Curless alone.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?