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The Sadness of Christ (Yale University Press Translation) Paperback – June 1, 1997

14 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0933932661 ISBN-10: 0933932669

15 New from $7.20 27 Used from $0.48
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Paperback, June 1, 1997
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Product Details

  • Series: Yale University Press Translation
  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Scepter Pubs (June 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0933932669
  • ISBN-13: 978-0933932661
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,175,129 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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40 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Ryan P. Hilderbrand on October 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
St. Thomas More writes a series of meditations on the passion of Christ in this short volume, beginning with the betrayal of the Iscariot and ends with the actual capture and trial of Jesus. More wrote this volume while contemplating his upcoming martyrdom; while seeing his friends from the London Carthusian Charterhouse being martyred; while receiving messages of encouragement from Bishop John Fisher, who resided in worse conditions in the cell below him in the infamous Tower of London.
This volume is a wonderful volume for meditation, but needs to be taken slowly. More was not one for long, flowery sentences, and thus wrote very simply. The initial urge is to read quickly. It is best to take in each word with this volume and picture Christ's suffering in one's mind while reading. A good book.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
I HIGHLY recommend this book. It is one great meditation on Our Lord's passion. St. Thomas More is clear and succint. He takes ideas to their logical conclusion, and definitely has a gift in this regard- the gifts that made him a great lawyer and statesman, as well as a glorious martyr are quite prominent in his meditations. He'll remind you to pray like you're speaking to God and love like God Himself suffered & died for you. I really liked the book and I have no doubt that it helped me grow in my knowledge of God's love, myself, and my response to God's love.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Susan Ruotsala Storm, Ph.D. on February 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
St. Martha Parish in Okemos, Michigan Bulletin Book Club March 2002 Selection Fr. Jonathan Wehrle, Pastor
As Roman Catholics we accept that we will die to this earth and be born into another. Our religion is rich in historic saints whose sufferings and trials mirror our contemporary human reaction to impending death. St. Thomas More is an example. He refused, even when faced with execution and death in Renaissance England, to deny his Christian life. Rather, he focused "sharply on Christ's human reaction to His approaching death." [p. v]
St. Thomas More wrote his last book with the purpose of contrasting "Christ's way of acting with our own." [p. vi] More, a lawyer and judge, served King Henry VIII as Chancellor of the Roman Catholic Church of England until he resigned in protest at the actions the king was taking to destroy the Catholic Church in England. While King Henry VIII did sunder the Church of England from Rome and further abused human and religious rights, it was not without the ultimate protest from More. Reflecting upon Christ's steadfastness provided solace for More in the Tower of London awaiting trial and his last confession and execution.
This final work of St. Thomas More's shares his reflections on the Passion and Death of Christ. Christ as fully God begged as man his Father to remove the passion to come, but humbly submitted when the choice was presented. More concludes from this that while Christ made distinctions, we also "sometimes apply to our whole selves things which actually are true only of the soul [made in the image and likeness of God], and on the other hand we sometimes speak of our selves when strict accuracy would require us to speak of our bodies alone." [p.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By "aburdach" on June 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
More's strength to face his imminent excecution leads him to ponder on Christ's Passion. His marvellous way of looking at life and man in the midst of political turbulence and of struggling against a tide of King Henry VIII followers gives us the necessary strength to strive in difficult situations and to think that happiness and love can be found in the detachmentof material things and as close followers of Christ's example
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J. Fitzsimmons on March 24, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Until reading this book, I had difficulting meditating on the agony in the garden. Thomas More takes the Gospels' descriptions of the event and commentates on them with a weatlh of saintly knowledge and scholarship. St. Thoms truly opened up this portion of the Gospels for me and deapened my understanding of them. This is must reading annually during lent.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Librarian on January 8, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Thomas More on Forgiveness

"The Sadness of Christ" by Thomas More is most excellent Lenten reading. He is reported to have been a deeply prayerful husband, father, lawyer, who rose to Speaker of the House of Commons, was knighted, and became the first layperson to be Lord Chancellor of England.

When a royal proclamation ordered the clergy to acknowledge Henry VIII as "Supreme Head" of the Church, More offered his resignation which was not accepted. Although he avowed his loyalty to the king, he refused to take the Oath of Succession, which had a clause repudiating "any foreign authority, prince or potentate"; i.e. the pope. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London, continuing his writing with bits of charcoal, until martyred by beheading at Tower Hill July 6, 1535. Sir Thomas More was canonized (recognized as a saint) in 1935 by Pope Pius XI.

What impressed me was his short but poignant writing on forgiveness, which gave a peek into his own Christ-like forgiving of Henry VIII, whom he had loyally served, but whose ego settled for nothing less than More's head. It can be read and re-read as a challenge to personal spirituality regardless of faith, calling for the ultimate loyalty:

"Bear no malice or evil will to any man living. For either the man is good or wicked. If he is good and I hate him, then I am wicked. If he is wicked, either he will amend and die good and go to God, or live wickedly and die wickedly and go to the devil. And then let me remember that if he be saved, he will not fail (if I am saved too, as I trust to be) to love me very heartily, and I shall then in like manner love him.
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