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Safe at Home: A Novel Paperback – Bargain Price, March 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 348 pages
  • Publisher: David C. Cook; New edition (March 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1434700100
  • ASIN: B0032FO3JY
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #509,084 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

After 25 years in advertising, Richard Doster, editor of byFaith, a publication of the Presbyterian Church, brings his rich Mississippi upbringing to the written page. He currently lives in Atlanta with his wife Sally, and while he's been published by the Atlanta Constitution Journal, this is his first novel.

More About the Author

Flannery O'Connor once said that fiction is a plunge into reality and a shock to the system. Her stories, and I hope mine, provide a true glimpse of a broken world--not merely to shock--but to inspire.

My books are, as one reviewer said of Safe at Home, part "comfort food, history lesson, social retrospective, and personal challenge." As you read them I hope you'll take the advice once given by Sir Frances Bacon: "Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider."

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 31 customer reviews
Doster weaves a truthful story.
Amazon Customer
It also shows that even with the desires to save something as wonderful as a minor league baseball team in a small town the power of prejudice.
B
The dialogue is natural, intriguing, and compelling.
Sarah Grizzle

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Lee on April 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
Safe at Home
As someone who grew up enjoying minor league baseball with my grandfather and in the era of de-segregation, this book vividly brought back fond and not-so-fond memories. Written with a fun style while causing us to think about serious subjects, this book is a must for all baby boomers, all who love baseball, and all who long for true racial reconciliation.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Eric A. Lanigan on May 4, 2008
Format: Paperback
It's hard to believe this is Doster's first book. He has that rare ability to tell a story so well that it doesn't matter what its about. For example, instead of saying that a preacher is nervous and unsure of what to say, he writes: "...he ventured into the uncomfortable unknown, and had no idea of where he was leading. He cleared his throat, hesitated, looked down at the notes he didn't have..." WOW! There are countless other places throughout the book where Doster crafts the most enjoyable language to describe the events and characters. At one point I thought the only shortcoming of the book was that he had not fully developed the character of Percy Jackson, the black ballplayer. Then I realized that this was intentional as the story revolves around Percy, but is really about the other characters and how they react to an upheaval in the relationship between the races. The ending didn't let me down - no romanticized happily-ever-after or pandering tragedy. I'll buy the sequel the first day its out!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 14, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I loved this book. The writing was solid. Doster is not going to win the Pulitzer, but he knows what he's doing. More importantly, it was a good story. Doster knows the south and he knows baseball and he uses this knowledge as the backdrop for a powerful story.

Perhaps the two things that set this book apart from other Christian fiction is it's subtlety and it's truthfulness. Subtlety is rare indeed in Christian fiction. Doster understands that the Christian writer needs not use fiction as a vehicle for systematic theology or as a thinly veiled Gospel tract. The faith of Jack Hall and his family is always there, Doster doesn't shy away from it, but there is more substance to the story which leads us to the second great thing about the book.

Doster weaves a truthful story. Jack Hall, even though he is a Christian, is still a sinner in need of grace. Throughout the story there is a gentle reminder that the Christian culture in the south needed, and still does need, sanctification. Jack's wife struggles with complex issues of integration, her own faith and family. Doster doesn't vilinize the Southerners opposed to integration, but he tells the truth, ultimately showing that a man who takes a stand on an issue like integration and race, even among friends, is going to find out that he isn't so safe at home.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lady ReadsaLot on February 26, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was a well written book that looked closely at the issues of segregation in the 1950s and put human faces in the situations. These wer not all bad people, these were not all ignorant people--this was a story of people who were afraid of what change could mean and yet were being forced to confront this change head on.

As reporter Jack Hall tries to mediate an impossible situation to save the small town's baseball team so everyone wins, while all Percy Jackson wants is to play baseball. The language is harsh at times, but the reader has to remember that the south just 60 years ago was a different world. As outside forces push even more change on this small town the citizens push at the first visible sign of this change they can see---a kid who just wants to play baseball.

It totally amazed me hearing the "logic" for keeping segregation in place coming out of Rose Marie as she was otherwise such a nice, likeable character, a loving and supportive wife and mother. And then I realized it had to be so because that was the reality of the south in the 1950s. We fear change because it is a step into the unknown. It wasn't until she came to know the real people involved and how much like her they really were that she could come to a small measure of acceptance of this change.

I look forward to the sequal and hope it is as well done with such great characters as this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ginny Scruggs on April 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
This was a great book. I am not a baseball fan and that did not matter. Safe At Home is about much more than baseball. It is dealing with racial issues in the 50's. I feel I got to know the characters, care about them, and see things from their point of view. That was especially good since they were coming from many different points of view.
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By MADMAX on July 7, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good read for a lazy summer evening or in front of fireplace in the Winter.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this with the promise of only reading it on the treadmill, and it has to be interesting to make the treadmill time pass quickly! This book relates the difficulty a small southern town encounters when the home team recruits a talented young black teen to rescue their failing team. It depicts the variety of struggles that individuals face, including those who don't want to be prejudiced but fear for their own safety. I have bought and read a lot of books, but am having trouble finding something that holds my attention as well as this did during my treadmill time.
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