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Sahara

14 customer reviews

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Audio CD, August 21, 1990
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$55.00 $9.99
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 21, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: RCA
  • ASIN: B000008GPJ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #100,421 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kathryn Jordan on May 23, 2006
Format: Audio CD
While most follow-up releases to a debut are not good, or are just average, SAHARA shines as a better follow-up to an impressive debut from House of Lords. This album contains several tracks -- "Chains of Love", "Can't Find My Way Home", and "Remeber My Name" -- that help give SAHARA.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nikiforos V. Skoumas on October 4, 2011
Format: Audio CD
"Sahara" is the second studio album by American melodic hard rock super-group "House of Lords" originally released in 1990. This second full-length effort found the "Lords" under a slightly different line-up than the original, featuring lead singer James Christian, keyboardist Craig Giuffria, bassist Chuck Wright, drummer Ken Mary along with new entry guitarist Michael Guy. The album also features guitar contributions by such heroes of the genre as Chris Impellitteri, Doug Aldrich and Rick Nielsen.

While fitting perfectly within the pomp hard rock genre, "Sahara" was substantially differentiated from its predecessor in terms of musical style. The song-writing would rely much more on riffs and tempos rather than melodies; at the same time integrating eastern-scale harmonies to the structures. The eastern-vibe is mainly traceable on Greg's keyboard arrangements, being an element that would partly characterize the group's later releases.

James Christian once again proves himself the ideal singer/front-man for the group, perfectly adapting to the demands of the compositions though the end result is far less catchy than the material found on their debut album. In addition this effort features a surprising consistency in tempos, for the biggest part being either standard or slow pace; clearly a far cry from the rhythmic variety found on later "Lords" releases. While far from the greatest moment in the "House of Lords" catalogue, "Sahara" offers a fair amount of memorable songs namely "Can't find my way home", "It ain't love" plus the classic/minor hit ballad "Remember my name" possibly the album's strongest moment.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By sauerkraut on October 28, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This second full-length album from House of Lords--Sahara--was released in 1990. It has ten tracks. One of these, "Can't Find My Way Home," is a rendition of a song from Blind Faith. All in all, this album's material is in a straight-ahead hard rock musical direction. There is solid songwriting, pleasing musicianship, and nice sound quality. Gregg Giuffria does not disappoint when it comes to his gratifying keyboard playing. James Christian does an effective job with his gravelly-voiced vocal delivery. The songs that I consider to be favorites are "Shoot," "Sahara," and "Remember My Name." The earnest, stately "Shoot" starts off with mysterious-sounding keyboard work from Giuffria. "Sahara" is a well-written, epic-sounding, regal composition; Giuffria provides majestic, tasteful keyboarding, the backing vocals are smooth and spirited, Ken Mary's drumming is enjoyable, and the song wraps up nicely with a well-crafted outro. The power ballad "Remember My Name" is attractive, and Christian supplies industrious singing. "American Babylon" is another example of a cut that I like--it is fun and sprightly, and Christian sings enjoyably. Even though the CD booklet does not have the song lyrics, a couple of color photos of the band are included; one of these is spread over two pages and is interesting. The disc is just over 44 minutes. Sahara is a recommendable album.
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By Fred Rayworth on January 18, 2013
Format: Audio Cassette
I bought this on cassette a long time ago and finally burned it to CD. I've now listened to it the requisite three times so I could get a feel for it and it was actually a struggle to get through the third listen. I say this not because it's an awful album because it isn't. It is well produced and the musicianship is solid. However, Gregg Giuffria, the founder of this band, outside of a few songs, seems to be on vacation from the recording of most of this album. I was expecting a lot more from him. This is a very guitar oriented bunch of songs. I have nothing against that, it's just that when the founder of the band seems to get shoved aside, that makes me wonder what's going on.

There are only two songs that even resonated with me and that's Can't Find My Way Home, a cover of the old Blind Faith song and Sahara. I like both songs because they are so different from the rest of the generic corporate MTV for-the-masses rockers. I hate to disparage the hard work these guys put into their music but most of this album comes off to me as calculated more than musical. When I listen to a piece of music, I expect to get something out of it, something that rocks my boat and this album certainly didn't do it. Maybe their other stuff does, but this sounded and looked (the photos of the band members) like hard rock/hair metal well after the trend died and MTV was already throwing away their actual music in favor of reality TV.

I don't want to come off as too harsh but I also have to tell it as I see it. There are far worse albums out there and I have nothing against the musicians. I understand there was a revolving door during the making of this album and I'm not sure who the real core members are or were. I'd look that up but I don't have any other albums by them and it's not a priority.
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Format: Audio CD
1990's Sahara may have been the second release from melodic rockers House of Lords, but it was their first album that truly felt more like a House of Lords effort than another Giuffria album. It's also an album with a huge sound, thanks in some part to the roster of impressive guest appearances. Departing guitarist Lanny Cordolla was replaced by Rick Nielsen (Cheap Trick), Chris Impellitteri (Impellitteri), Doug Aldrich (Lion), and Mandy Meyer (Krokus), and background vocals were provided by Mike Tramp (White Lion), Steve Plunkett (Autograph), Ron Keel (Keel), Robin Zander (Cheap Trick) and even sacked Giuffria frontman David Glen Eisley. I don't know if it was the band that pulled such impressive talent in, or if it was label boss Gene Simmons, but it's hard to argue with the results.

Sahara is about as perfect as a melodic hard rock album can be. Unlike the Giuffria albums (and to some extent the first HoL album), Greg Giuffria's keyboards aren't the main focus of Sahara. Instead, the album has a huge guitar rock sound, including melodic hooks to die for and some flat-out incredible solos. The vocals also take center stage, and not just because of the impressive array of backing vocalists (though that certainly helps). Singer James Christian really comes into his own here. He sounded like he was trying to stick close to David Glen Eisley's vocal style on the debut, but here he sounds like the strong, confident, unique vocalist that he is. The production is great, and the songwriting is impeccable. You listen to songs like the unforgettable ballad "Remember My Name" (killer solo on that one), all-out rocker "American Babylon" and the cover of Blind Faith's "Can't Find My Way Home" and wonder how in the world Sahara wasn't the biggest album of 1990.
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