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Sailing to Paradise: The Discovery of the Americas by 7000 B. C. Hardcover – August 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (August 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684812975
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684812977
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7.5 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,492,768 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 5, 1998
Format: Hardcover
It surprises me that it is necessary to argue whether or not Columbus discovered the Americas. But whatever you call it, Columbus transformed the world by what he did. Even so, Sailing to Paradise presents a case for not even the odd visit before Columbus but of a substantial intercourse between the two hemispheres during the Bronze Age. Very much like Ignatius Donnelly's Atlantis for today (although one to be taken seriously), this book compiles all the evidence of pre-Columbian contact.
The thesis is this: tin and copper, needed in to make bronze, only existed in sufficient quantities in America. (The source is otherwise a mystery.) Trade was carried out and the metals (and religions) transported to the Middle East by the sea people, Atlas people or Phoenicians, and distributed. (It gets very complex.) Even megalithic stones, like Stonehenge, were built for navigation to America. When iron surpassed bronze, trade ended and so did commerce, except in small numbers. It also presents evidence of significant interaction between America and India.
Presents many solid foundations for the approach to understanding history, but although sometimes convincing in its arguments, it often inserts any scrap to prove a point, firm or flimsy, and often requires leaps of faith on short evidence. Interprets almost all stories (myths, Bibles, hearsay) as relating to his thesis. At one turn saying that one thing can be taken literally, but that another must be substantially re-interpreted in order to fit it well into the picture of the Bronze-Age world he describes. Yet the only real incredible thing to accept is that every mystery is explained by this one idea.
Still it is thought-provoking and self critical enough to be taken for serious consideration.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By D. Lovering on October 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Bailey's 'Sailing to Paradise' is both interesting and informative, largely due to its role as a compendium of related facts and source-document references unavailable anywhere else (at least under a single cover). Where the author sticks to actual background and archaeological evidence, the premise of the work is sound.

Unfortunately, like many first-time authors of a genre Bailey doesn't end there.

His theories about America being the root of the ancient Atlantis mythology appear again and again, held together with vestiges of inferences drawn from the most tenuous of associations. Later in the work these are cited as 'grounds' for making further assumptions, until the edifice of half-supported innuendo, conjecture, personal interpretation and single-source citations becomes a house of cards - ready to topple at even the slightest push. I found for example a number of linguistic and epigraphical premises (the author's) which were not only contrary to accepted canon, but entirely outside the author's own realm of professional expertise.

While the book is seriously flawed as an integral work of academic research, it remains interesting and useful. Unlike the speculative works of Erich von Däniken and other pseudo-science writers, Bailey takes pains to cite real authorities, correctly attributes photographs, maps, and other reference materials, and provides a unifying historical context which is (for the most part) cohesive and plausible.

Within these narrow confines 'Sailing to Paradise' makes an interesting read. With aggressive editing and serious academic oversight it might well have been a seminal work of great importance. As it is the reader is left with the unenviable task of mining the book's gems from a considerable amount of largely irrelevant dross. What one takes away from it is therefore largely dependent on how much sweat-equity is invested.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 29, 1999
Format: Hardcover
It is a fact that North and South America are crawling with evidence that there were visitors from Europe and Asia centuries before Columbus. Skeletons, artifacts and inscriptions abound. Denied by mainstream archaeology, but refuted by analysis of DNA, bone structure and common sense. (See the April 26, 1999 issue of Newsweek -- it is the cover story.) If you like this book, you will like Gloria Farley's "In Plain Sight."
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