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Sailor s Creek: Major General G. W. Custis Lee, Captured with Controversy Perfect Paperback – August 1, 2008

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Perfect Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Schroeder Publications: Civil War; 1st edition (August 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1889246409
  • ISBN-13: 978-1889246406
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,015,626 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By James W. Durney TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 29, 2008
Format: Perfect Paperback
Battles are millions of individual actions that take place under incredible stress, while no one is trying to take detailed notes. The reports filed after the battle attempt to bring order to a chaotic event, justify actions, blame others and take credit. Until we stop writing reports or establish a perfect world this is true. The American Civil War produced more than a fair share of questions that the battle reports do little to answer. In the years after the war, veterans fought to establish the answer to these questions in the press and letters. The best known of these battles, General Warren's removal by General Sheridan or Fitz John Potter's court martial, can rate as much as a paragraph in a good history. Which was the first regiment atop Missionary Ridge or into the line at Cemetery Ridge, may not rate a footnote. The men who were there fought out these questions along with hundreds of others in the years following the war. These men were, for the most part, still active with good memories in possession of the majority of their facilities. Answering these questions could make a major difference in the lives of the men involved. Honor, medals, pensions and reputations were at risk. Being found wrong could involve loss of prestige, position, medals, pensions and exposure as a fraud. In the closed world of 19th century America, this was less attractive than it would be today. Many lived in the community of their birth and enjoyed a large measure of community support.
The author discovered that his great great grandfather was involved in one of these questions. During the battle of Sailor's Creek, he may or may not have captured CSA Major General G. W. Custis Lee. Harris S. Hawthorn of the 121st New York received credit for capturing Lee. David D.
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Format: Perfect Paperback
The Army long ago presented the nation's most hallowed award, the Medal of Honor, to a Civil War soldier from New York for capturing Confederate General Robert E. Lee's eldest son. But sometimes history calls for a bit of revision.

Now, 146 years after the capture, the Army has agreed to take another look at whether it made a mistake and whether a young private from the Berkshires deserved the honor instead. Regiment accounts provide reason to think Private David D. White, of Cheshire, nabbed Lee during a barbaric battle in the wilds of Virginia in the war's waning days.

The Army's unusual reconsideration is a victory for White's descendants, particularly his great-great-grandson, Frank E. White Jr., who has worked for decades to set the record straight. He recently enlisted the aid of Massachusetts lawmakers in the effort.

In reviewing the case, the Army also casts a light on a key battle that is largely unknown, except among historians and Civil War buffs who note its frenzied viciousness, even in the context of a war known for its brutality.

At one junction in the Battle of Sailor's Creek in the waning days of the war, White and his Massachusetts brethren fought a desperate hand-to-hand assault against the rebels near the banks of a swollen Virginia creek, slashing with bayonets, clubbing one another with muskets, and biting one another's throats as they grappled on the muddy ground.

The battle was a stunning victory for the Yankees; the South called it "Black Thursday.'' Yet it became a footnote, eclipsed by the Confederate surrender days later at Appomattox.

Not so for Frank White. He wrote a 2008 book, "Sailor's Creek: Major General G.W.
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Format: Perfect Paperback
Great book about a wonderfully bright man out shadowed by his fathers legacy.
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