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  • SainSmart DSO203 MINI Kit, 72MHz, 4-CH, STM32 Metal shell *NEWEST VERSION*
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SainSmart DSO203 MINI Kit, 72MHz, 4-CH, STM32 Metal shell *NEWEST VERSION*

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List Price: $200.00
Price: $163.00 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Specifications for this item
Brand Name SainSmart
UPC 811820020020

Overview The oscilloscope easily suffice common electro... Read full product description




Product Features

  • AD9288-40 dual A/D converter analogue channels from 36MS/s to 72MS/s
  • Signal Generator,Auto Measurement,Various Triggering Option
  • Two 72Mhz analog channels and two digital channels
  • Built-in 8M USB disk
  • Easy waveform storage,Firmware upgrade,User applications,Open source

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Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B006J4FZMO
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #24,551 in Industrial & Scientific (See Top 100 in Industrial & Scientific)
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Frequently Bought Together

SainSmart DSO203 MINI Kit, 72MHz, 4-CH, STM32 Metal shell *NEWEST VERSION* + Elenco Electronics TL-21 Minigrabber to Minigrabber 5 pc Test Lead Set
Price for both: $174.56

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Product Description

Overview

The oscilloscope easily suffice common electronic engineering tasks. It's based on ARM cortex M3 (STM32VCT6), providing 72Mhz analog bandwidth with integrated FPGA and high speed ADC. Internal 8MB USB disk could be used to store waveform, user application and upgrade firmware. This is the newest version with the software upgraded to lib 2.25 app2.6

This pocket oscilloscope is largely employed for programs inside following circumstances:

1. Repair popular electronic devices outside (Air conditioning or Industrial frequency inverter power supply, AC / DC switching electrical power supply or inverter, elevator and constructing fire safety products, industrial control circuit)
2. Hardware preservation or software program debugging RS232, RS485, I2C, CAN along with other communications interface circuits, LED show and keyboard scan driver circuit, brushless motor drive circuit
3. Audio devices and circuits, electronic toys and remote handle designs, car or truck repair electronic circuits
4. College after-school teaching practice and college student advancement of electronic modest manufacturing
5. Should sluggish signal adjustments observed applications (such as: relay and change contacts jitter, battery cost and discharge curves on the load transient response strength provide, temperature sensor attributes measurement)
6. The relevant provide electronic circuit (SCR voltage regulator, strength component correction, electronic vitality saving lamps, dysprosium lamp mercury lamp sodium lamp xenon lights drive circuit), As for other problems this sort of as: CPU clock, RAM entry, bus and USB or Ethernet signal measurement, high frequency plus the video circuitry plus the must use FFT for signal analysis and so on event.

Package Content

1 x DSO203
2 x Probes 1x/10x
1 x USB Cable
1 x bag for DSO203


Customer Reviews

The instructions could be better but the scope works great.
Mini Might
The four channel scope is perfect for technicians working on radio equipment or troubleshooting logic circuits.
maddhacker
So four hours of trying every possible technique to update the calibration were fruitless.
HD Rider

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By R. Vernon on September 8, 2012
Verified Purchase
This is the latest hardware and software rev of the DSO 203 as of 9/8/2012. It's WAYYY better than the V2.6. Nice screwed down battery compartment. Battery pre-installed. Feels better in your hands. Looking forward to the CHIP firmware. It's a decent micro-portable o-scope for doing things like ESR measurement (nice built in signal generator). Great for doing circuit tracing. I only had to build a small experiment box to get the octopus circuit up and running. You can buy MCX male to BNC/Coax/SMC pigtail cables to do all kinds of things including using your old attenuators. It's really not bad. Menu navigation takes about 10-20 minutes to learn. Don't get frustrated and just practice and you will get the hang of it in no time. Keep in mind the menu nav had to be really tight due to the lack of navigation buttons and screen real estate. I think a touch screen would be the only thing I would add. Being able to drag the trigger/ time-delta/ voltage-delta markers would have been nice.

OH, and go to EBAY to grab 3 MCX to micro clip pig tails for C,D and sig-gen out.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By HD Rider on February 27, 2013
Verified Purchase
First of all, I have to say as an electrical engineer and a tech geek, I was like a kid in a candy store waiting for this to arrive. And when it did, I was excited to get it up and running. The build quality is excellent and looked like this was going to fit into my portable lab equipment quite nicely. But then, I tried to calibrate it. The included instructions are horrible, so I went online to check the calibration procedure. I followed it to the letter at least a half a dozen times. But it would never change the results. I then checked other websites and confirmed that the calibration steps that I was using were correct. But every time I tried to save the calibration, the unit would just get stuck in a calibrate loop. I gave it to an engineering buddy and he tried to calibrate it and got the same results. No parameters would ever change and the voltage reading were off by about 20% on every scale. So four hours of trying every possible technique to update the calibration were fruitless. It's a huge disappointment, because everything else about the unit was great, and even fun to play with. But if the voltage readings aren't accurate, its just useless to me. So back she goes. My quest for a little o-scope continues........
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Chris Dragon on July 14, 2013
Oscilloscopes cost a lot. More than I would expect, but I guess it's because there's not a mass market for them. I've always wanted one but never used one, so I'm no expert, but this one seems like it has good features for the price (compared to other scopes I've investigated). After owning this scope for a year, I'm still not an expert, but I'm not sorry I purchased it.

I've had a few projects over the years where I wished I had an oscilloscope but I didn't, so I spent a lot of time guessing and trying different things until it worked. I think this scope is good enough it would have saved me a lot of time on those projects. I've already used it to fix an annoying crackling in my computer speakers (scope showed the tops of larger sine waves were clipped flat, which I realized was actually just the "regain volume" setting in my music player pushing the signal beyond its allowed voltage range). I also used it to find an AC power supply to run a normally battery-powered motion detector. Without the scope, I had been trying different power supplies and filtering capacitors and waiting to see if the detector would malfunction, which it always did, apparently because of voltage spikes of plus or minus 58mV that I can now see on the scope (but barely - the spikes are only 7 pixels or less at maximum zoom, but the Vmax value does increase by 58mV when compared to Vmax when the probe isn't connected). Note that at max zoom, the scope itself always reads a pixel up or down of background noise even with the probes disconnected, so if you need more accuracy than that, this isn't the scope for you. Each pixel represents 2mV at max zoom (every 25 pixels represents 50mV), which means the graph is showing about +4mV of fluctuation.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mark Twain on April 20, 2013
Verified Purchase
I had this for less than one day and decided it just wasn't appropriate for any realistic testing I would do with it. The calibration changes depending on if you're running on batteries or the charger, the connectors are non-standard as far as test equipment goes, and the controls are too hard to use when you're trying to get something done.

I ordered an OWON benchtop 'scope and have been very happy with it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steven J. Greenfield on January 15, 2014
This is NOT a 72MHz bandwidth scope. It is rated at 72Msps or 72 mega samples per second, but it is really two 36Msps ADC channels. That is shared between the active channels, so if you have all four channels running, it is down to only 18Msps.

I gave this only 1 star because it is NOT a "72MHz analog bandwidth" scope. As a 4.4MHz scope, I would give it 4 stars. I'd leave off the last star because of the rotten documentation, nonstandard connectors, crappy sine wave on the built-in function generator, and difficulty in figuring out how to update the firmware.

An analog signal like a sine wave requires -at- -least- 8 samples per cycle, which puts this at about 4.5MHz with all four channels going.

This is born out by the antialiasing filters on U17 and U18 on the two analog channels which have a -3dB cutoff of about 4.4MHz. That goes for -everyone's- DSO203.

It is important to know that channels 3 and 4 are digital only. I think they accept CMOS 5V logic levels. In addition, the wrong TVS protection diodes sourced for the two digital channels, limiting the bandwidth on them to about 1MHz max. For reasonable accuracy on a digital signal, that means they are only useful to about 100kHz. This is only on channels 3 and 4.

The documentation is on SainSmart's website and is pretty good. You'll need an unpacker that supports RAR files.

As a really small ~4MHz portable oscilloscope, this is not completely horrible. It has a built-in signal generator (10Hz to 8MHz) and it can fit in your laptop bag or in a briefcase. This is an open source design, so there are a lot of custom updates to the firmware out there. The internal function generator is used to adjust x10 probe compensation, the capacitors are under the battery.
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