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Saint Iggy Hardcover – September 1, 2006


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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Starred Review. Grade 9 Up–Iggy Corso, 16, doesnt do drugs, even though he was born addicted to crack. He lives in a city housing project, in an apartment filled with furniture that his stoned and drunken father collects from the street. Iggys mother is an addict who has been AWOL for a month. The cool thing about the teen is that, despite his parents and his environment, he doesnt feel sorry for himself. A freshman who has failed two grades and been suspended eight times, he takes things for what they are, until he gets suspended again, pending a hearing. His principal says to him, Youve had a lot to overcome...but....We can all...do something that contributes.... After listening to this, Iggy realizes that his only chance for the future is to get back into school. The principals statement haunts him throughout the book. He enlists help from his so-called mentor/friend, Mo (who was suspended from pre-law school after being caught smoking pot), but his association with this disaffected youth from a wealthy family creates a whole new set of problems. Thick pencil lines run down the inner margins of the pages; Iggys life is like these lines, on the edge, reaching out, searching for somewhere to go. The story is told in widely spaced paragraphs, making it a good choice for reluctant readers. Like Troy Billings in Goings Fat Kid Rules the World (Putnam, 2003), Iggy Corso is unforgettable.–Shannon Seglin, Chantilly Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

When he is suspended from high school for an altercation with a teacher, Iggy feels completely misunderstood. As he waits for the hearing that will decide whether he will be expelled, he vows to change everyone's perception of him by following his principal's advice: "Do something that contributes to the world." Expecting no support from his drug-addicted mother and "stoned off his ass" father, Iggy turns to a former tutor and friend, Mo, a college dropout interested in pot and Eastern religions. Then Mo's own drug habit escalates. With Iggy tagging along, Mo heads to his wealthy parents' apartment for money, and in Mo's mother, Iggy finds the parental care he craves. Readers will want to talk about the shocking ending and its religious imagery, which raises questions about martyrdom, class politics, and the many ways that children can slip away from help. Going, the author of the Printz Honor Book Fat Kid Rules the World (2003), grounds her story in grim, realistic urban details, and she creates a memorable character in Iggy, whose first-person voice is earnest, angry, sarcastic, and filled with small insights that reveal how people care for and mistreat each other. Teens will connect with Iggy's powerful sense that although he notices everything, he is not truly seen and accepted himself. Gillian Engberg
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Harcourt Children's Books (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0152057951
  • ISBN-13: 978-0152057954
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,291,623 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

K.L. Going is the award-winning author of books for children and teens. Her first novel, Fat Kid Rules the World was a Michael Printz Honor Book, listed with YALSA's Best Books for Young Adults and their Best Books for the Past Decade. Her books have been Booksense picks, Scholastic Book Club choices, Junior Library Guild selections, NY Public Library Best Books for the Teenage, and winners of state book awards. Her work has been published in Korea, Italy, Japan, Germany, and the UK, and Fat Kid Rules the World is now a major motion picture!

K.L. began her career working at one of the oldest literary agencies in New York City. She used this inner knowledge of publishing to write Writing and Selling the Young Adult Novel -- a how-to book for aspiring writers, published by Writer's Digest. She has also written short stories for several anthologies and currently has multiple picture books under contract. She lives in Glen Spey, NY where she both writes and runs a business critiquing manuscripts. She's also an adoring mom.

To visit KL on-line go to www.klgoing.com, www.facebook.com/KLGoing, or find her on Twitter!

Customer Reviews

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See all 9 customer reviews
That seems like such an easy thing to do until he tries it.
Teen Reads
The contrast of Iggy's dark urban world against Mo's posh lifestyle provides the story with an ideal backdrop for a grim hero like this to emerge.
Amazon Customer
I am an English teacher who has been looking for YA books to read in the classroom.
Teacher

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Teen Reads on January 4, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Randy "Igmund" Corso is a third-year freshman with a colorful track record at school. When you have a record like he does, teachers can lie about you, and no one believes you, especially not the court system that's supposed to decide if you're expelled from school or not. With the way everyone treats him, you'd think he's a bad kid, but he's not. He attends class, sometimes. He doesn't use drugs, even though he was born addicted. He does his best to stay away from his father's drug dealer Freddie, who is always knocking on their door looking for money.

With his dad most likely passed out drunk or high at home and his mom "visiting someone" somewhere, Iggy doesn't have anyone to tell when he gets indefinitely suspended from high school for an offense he didn't commit. Even the social worker can't get through because the phone has been disconnected.

With a few days until the hearing, Iggy turns to his friend Montell, a law school dropout from the rich side of town who is investing his time in pot and philosophy. Iggy needs a plan to straighten out his life, but that's more difficult done than said for a 16-year-old with no skills or money who has just been kicked out of school. His makeshift plan is to:

1) make a plan

2) get out of the projects

3) do something with my life

4) change everyone's mind about me

5) get back into school

During the week before Christmas, Iggy drags himself around the city looking for answers and enlightenment. He keeps thinking about his principal, who told him to "do something that contributes to the world." That seems like such an easy thing to do until he tries it.

How exactly can one kid do something to contribute? What if he's never had any examples to follow?
Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo on August 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Iggy Corso isn't a bad kid. He's not that bright, and he often does and says things long before thinking through the consequences of his actions, but he isn't inherently bad. Iggy is the product of his upbringing, which includes an alcoholic father, a junkie mother, and life in the projects. His school file is crammed with notations regarding his run-ins with security, teachers, and the principal. But this time, Iggy's been expelled from high school pending a hearing with the Superintendent, and there's no one around for him to tell--no one around, in fact, to even care.

Iggy, though, has a plan. He'll contribute to the world, will somehow make a difference in these few short days before Christmas and his school hearing, and convince everyone--from his parents to Principal Olmos--that they were wrong about him. The first part of Iggy's plan involves getting out of the Projects, so he goes to the only other place he knows, which is the dump where his friend Mo lives. Mo was kicked out of college, where he was studying pre-law, for smoking pot, and now he lives in an apartment with a broken window and ratty furniture, alternately stoned and renouncing all material hings. But Iggy needs Mo's help to get him back into school, so he follows him along when Mo decides to get a line of credit on some pot.

Iggy doesn't do drugs. Everything thinks he does, because of his home life, but being born addicted to crack did more to Iggy than just slow down his brain. He's seen firsthand how it affects his family, especially his mother, who has been gone for months now "visiting" someone. He's seen Freddie, his father's dealer, break his father's fingers when his dad didn't have the money to pay for his drugs.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 17, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Randy "Igmund" Corso is a third-year freshman with a colorful track record at school. When you have a record like he does, teachers can lie about you, and no one believes you, especially not the court system that's supposed to decide if you're expelled from school or not. With the way everyone treats him, you'd think he's a bad kid, but he's not. He attends class, sometimes. He doesn't use drugs, even though he was born addicted. He does his best to stay away from his father's drug dealer Freddie, who is always knocking on their door looking for money.

With his dad most likely passed out drunk or high at home and his mom "visiting someone" somewhere, Iggy doesn't have anyone to tell when he gets indefinitely suspended from high school for an offense he didn't commit. Even the social worker can't get through because the phone has been disconnected.

With a few days until the hearing, Iggy turns to his friend Montell, a law school dropout from the rich side of town who is investing his time in pot and philosophy. Iggy needs a plan to straighten out his life, but that's more difficult done than said for a 16-year-old with no skills or money who has just been kicked out of school. His makeshift plan is to:

1) make a plan
2) get out of the projects
3) do something with my life
4) change everyone's mind about me
5) get back into school

During the week before Christmas, Iggy drags himself around the city looking for answers and enlightenment. He keeps thinking about his principal, who told him to "do something that contributes to the world." That seems like such an easy thing to do until he tries it.

How exactly can one kid do something to contribute? What if he's never had any examples to follow?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

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