Saint Joan 1957 NR CC

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An all-star cast brings the dramatic story of Joan of Arc to the big screen. A French teenage girl is inspired by divine intervention to lead the King's armies to victory.

Starring:
Richard Widmark, Richard Todd
Runtime:
1 hour 51 minutes

Saint Joan

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Product Details

Genres Drama, International
Director Otto Preminger
Starring Richard Widmark, Richard Todd
Supporting actors Anton Walbrook, John Gielgud, Felix Aylmer, Archie Duncan, Harry Andrews, Margot Grahame, Barry Jones, Francis De Wolff, Finlay Currie, Victor Maddern, Bernard Miles, David Oxley, Patrick Barr, Sydney Bromley, Kenneth Haigh, David Langton, Jean Seberg, Thomas Gallagher
Studio Otto Preminger Films
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

The Warner Archive DVD is as usual an excellent edition and well worth it.
V. Risoli
The version of Otto Preminger's SAINT JOAN pictured on this product page is not from Starz/Anchor Bay.
Annie Van Auken
No masterpiece, but time has been kind to the film, and to Seberg's contribution.
R. Gorey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By R. Gorey on June 19, 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Otto Preminger's stagy retelling of the Joan of Arc history/legend was pilloried on its release, and Jean Seberg's performance roasted (no pun intended). Seen today, the film is a stylized, often uneven, but worthwhile experience. Seberg is rough around the edges, but contrary to popular myth, isn't the shameful embarrassment critics made her out to be. Much worse is Richard Widmark's Dauphin, a cringe-worthy contribution to an otherwise stately, literate, and entertaining adaptation of the George Bernard Shaw play. The movie feels much like a television production from the same era: the crispness of the black and white images and the curiously flat nature of the settings and costumes mark it as something less than the typical fifties wide-screen epic, and something more than the typical "Playhouse 90" offerings of the period. Fans of Seberg will want to see the film: this edition is from the "Warner Archive" DVD releases, and as such is given the bare-bones treatment: no commentaries, no "making of" features, and a print that appears cropped from the original (Cinemascope?) version seen in theaters. I've had some playable issues with other Warner Archive editions: this DVD played well on three players, without skipping or stopping. No masterpiece, but time has been kind to the film, and to Seberg's contribution. Interesting to compare this version to the silent, Dreyer version, and the oddball Technicolor Victor Fleming film (1948), with a too-old Ingrid Bergman. Joan's story is filled with contradictions, betrayals, and turnabouts, and this film version recreates most of them in a compelling, stylized, and sometimes clumsy way. Should you buy the DVD? Well, not if you've been holding out for a special edition with commentaries and documentaries, but the print is clean, and this may be the only way to see Preminger's film for a while.
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26 of 33 people found the following review helpful By "moroccomole" on September 25, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Director Otto Preminger's stab at the George Bernard Shaw play was pilloried for the miscasting of Jean Seberg in the title role, but she's hardly the sole reason why this well-intentioned film version doesn't work. Richard Widmark gives one of his silliest screen performances as the Dauphin, and many of the smaller roles are quite hammily portrayed as well.
Still, this VHS version does include a very well-made behind-the-scenes featurette (for once, you don't have to have a DVD player to enjoy this sort of extra). SAINT JOAN is still worth seeing, if only to appreciate how much more confident an actress Seberg would become in BONJOUR TRISTESSE (also directed by Preminger) and, of course, in Godard's BREATHLESS.
(And if you're a fan of this movie or of Seberg in general, don't miss Mark Rappaport's amazing un-documentary FROM THE JOURNALS OF JEAN SEBERG.)
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By V. Risoli on February 9, 2011
Format: DVD
Otto Preminger's "Saint Joan" was based upon George Bernard Shaw's play and adapted by Graham Greene and is indeed flawed but must be remembered for the highlights it does hold. His discovery after a much publicized search for a leading lady and the finding of Jean Seberg who is a stellar Joan. Others in the cast, John Gielgud, Richard Todd, Anton Walbrook, Harry Andrews and Richard Widmark (the critical lambasting he received is less that it doesn't work as he is integral to Otto's movie version) are fine. The times the movie seems inept (except for the costumes which look uncomfortable), the movie makes up for in genuinely rich vision. Otto keeps his love for Shaw's play in earnest. The fact that poor Jean Seberg was nearly seriously burnt when the initial igniting of the fires during her scene of being burned at the stake is again evidence of the hard work and impressive debut she gave. The music by Mischa Spoliansky is complementary and Saul Bass's titles are again a work of genius. But Otto the showman, (producer and director) (as a director Otto was always efficient, usually bringing in his pictures nearly under budget) provides another classic to a career of consistently fine films. It is my favorite depiction of St. Joan's story. (Mark Twain's "Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc" is another although unfilmed). I wish Otto were alive and working still. The Warner Archive DVD is as usual an excellent edition and well worth it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Simon on February 8, 2011
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
When Jean Seberg starred in Saint Joan, her first movie, the critics gave her thoroughly negative reviews. Being that this was her first movie and that Otto Preminger was a very demanding and harsh director to work with, I would have thought that the critics and the public would have been more sympathetic. I decided to view this movie with curiosity and some trepidation. I was pleasantly surprised. I believe Ms. Seberg did a very good job, considering she had no experience in movies. The fault I found with this picture was the script. I found it to be rather silly and immature, considering the subject matter.

I would recommend this movie to any Jean Seberg fan.
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14 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Scamp Lumm on March 29, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Saint Joan premiered in London on May 26, 1924. Written by Irish playwright, George Bernard Shaw, Saint Joan was adapted to film by Graham Greene. Otto Preminger directed and produced this film in 1957. Saint Joan was actress Jean Seberg's first movie; she was 17 years old then probably the same age as Jeanne D'arc herself when her unpaid career began in the French military.
Joan of Arc died in Rouen, France in Normandy on May 30, 1431. She was burned at the stake.
This movie is one of my all time favorite Christian flicks. I'm no movie critic; I just love good stories and look more for content/value than anything else. This movie is incredible, makes me want to reread Dickens's Tale of Two Cities. I prefer this version of Joan of Arc over any others out there. Bernard Shaw's play by itself is a classic. It's a story that left me pondering over the involvement of various churches and governments in war, particularly, in this tale, the Catholic church and English government. The impoverished, over-taxed French peasant class rallied round Joan at the siege of Orleans, her ill-clad compatriots scrambling over walls and ditches to fight the English. Makes me wonder why the church or state sometimes creates the conditions, e.g. oppression and poverty, which lead to war in the first place. It's definitely something to think about this Easter season, not to mention in an election year.
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