Sainthood

March 15, 2011 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
3:06
30
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2:42
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3:24
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4
2:45
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2:11
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3:22
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2:04
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2:31
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9
2:41
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2:38
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11
3:06
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12
3:21
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13
2:57

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 23, 2009
  • Release Date: October 23, 2009
  • Label: Vapor/Sire
  • Copyright: 2009 Sire Records. Marketed by Reprise Records, A Warner Music Group Company.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 36:48
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002T3FZJW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,080 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

And there are really great songs.
J. Knapp
I'm super partial to Tegan and Sara because I already love them , but after hearing this album my love just got deeper.
Tiffani
Fantastic lyrics, great sounding music and beautiful vocals.
Grace Hayek

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 47 people found the following review helpful By M. Case on November 5, 2009
Format: Audio CD
I wanted to love this, I really did. I honestly feel that this is going to be one of those albums that will be fiercely debated among fans, and there may be a great divide.

I've been a longtime fan of Tegan and Sara since I first heard their album "If It Was You." I've dutifully collected their albums since 2003, and have loved the majority of their music. There has been great departures from album to album, as if they're leapfrogging sonically through various sounds and musical styles. I can respect this, as I'd hate for a band to get pigeonholed as a one-note...however, this album-while still brilliantly written with a poignant concept- is a musical disconnect for me. Their earlier albums had a warmth to the music that has slowly dwindled away with "The Con." While I still liked their last album (in a catchy, synth-pop way), "Sainthood" feels a little like those pop-punk studio recorded bands where the acoustic music is shined up and mechanized with digital samples and loops. I have no qualms with using layers of synthetic samples/loops/beats, but this feels like it doesn't fully devote itself to one side or the other. On top of that, I've never heard Tegan and Sara sound so divided. To me, it sounds as if they've given up trying to intertwine with one another and instead of collaborating as a unit, it's as if two split pieces are being held together for the sake of a studio album.

The album is fine. I don't regret buying it. Musically, I just don't feel the visceral passion that was apparent in their previous work. I'm sad to say that while their writing has become richer and more beautiful, I'm also feeling more alienated from the actual music and melodies they picked to accompany the lyrics.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Rudolph Klapper on October 27, 2009
Format: Audio CD
With 2007's deceptively layered breakout record The Con, Tegan and Sara Quin, along with uber-indie producer Chris Walla, reveled in the darker recesses of indie pop, merging unconventional song structures and atypically diverse instrumentation with the kind of incisive, realistic lovelorn tales the two long ago perfected. Few would have expected the record to chart as well as it did, and it's probably no coincidence that this, their sixth record, capitalizes on this. It's perhaps the band's most accessible to date, but these identical twins are hardly the likeliest candidates to be mainstream sellouts. Rather, Sainthood is a full-bodied, meticulously crafted rock record, one that stands firmly on its bedrock foundation of guitar, drums, and bass and lets the duo's way with words and distinctive personalities shape the album into yet another uniquely Tegan and Sara album.

The two have always grounded their work in an essentially rock/pop mix, but never as blatantly as on Sainthood. Forgoing the quirky sonic soundscapes and expanded textures that characterized The Con, Walla beefs up the guitars and turns the amps up to 11, resulting in a thoroughly muscular record. From the jagged chords that open "Arrow" to the shiny keyboards and charging drum rhythm on closer "Someday," Walla and the twins pulls no punches, concocting a potent blend of post-punk and polished pop-rock that rarely lets off the gas pedal. It's perhaps Tegan and Sara's most direct record to date, one that shines the spotlight squarely on what has always been the two's strongest asset: their lyrics.

Tegan continues to play the role of designated hitmaker, penning catchy gems like propulsive first single "Hell" and the chiming alternative gem "The Cure.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jamie on March 15, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Many of the albums I absolutely love took me a few listens to really appreciate. Sometimes an album doesn't have that overwhelming feel that makes you go "Wow... what was that!?" Sometimes you listen to an album and you are ready to dismiss it because you don't instantly connect with it, but then you figure, "hey I spent money on this I guess I'll give it another chance." That's me with this album. My first time through I was so disappointed that it wasn't The Con part II I just about gave up on it. Then I listened to it a few more times and I realized something. This album really is just like every other T&S album: it's a departure from what they have previously done, though reminiscent of the past. Once I pushed The Con out of my head and listened to this album, in as much of a void as I could, I fell in love with it.

The Con overwhelmed me, it was an absolute force to be reckoned with. You hear a song like "Floorplan" and you have to decide if you like it or not. Sainthood is much more unassuming. Its consistency, melodies, and subtle intricacies wore me down and won me over. Again, if you are trying to draw comparisons between this album and The Con you will feel like somehow T&S abandoned their "sound." But if you are able to listen to Sainthood for what it is, you might be surprised how it's much closer to a heavier So Jealous. Both albums are much more straight ahead Pop.

I've seen many reviewers complain about the repetition on this album. I just thought I would point out that this is nothing new for T&S (especially Sara's songs and this is the first album she contributed more than Tegan). Look up the lyrics to Walking With a Ghost (no they didn't miss a verse).
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