Saladin and the Fall of Jerusalem (Illustrated) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$13.39
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by D&L eTail
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Tight binding with crisp, clean and unmarked pages. Light shelf/reading wear on front and back covers.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Saladin and the Fall of Jerusalem Hardcover – August, 2002


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$11.25 $2.16

Ancient History Books
Browse books on the Roman empire, Greek mythology, and more. Learn more

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stanley Lane-Poole was an eminent historian of the history of the Middle East. His works include The Moors in Spain and The Art of the Saracens Cairo. David Nicolle is an acknowledged expert on the military history of the Middle Ages.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Greenhill Books (August 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1853675032
  • ISBN-13: 978-1853675034
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,335,521 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Joe TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 29, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Recently, I saw the 2005 film THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN, a sword and shield epic centered upon the 1187 recapture of Jerusalem from the Christians by Sultan Yusuf Ibn Najni al-Din Ayyub Ibn Shadlhi Abu'l-Muzaffar Salah al-Din al-Malik al-Nasir, aka "Saladin". The hero of the film was not Saladin (Ghassan Massoud), but rather Balian (Orlando Bloom), who, as the film opens, is sweating over a hot forge as a sword maker in some dump of a rural French town in the early 1180s. Then, along comes Godfrey (Liam Neeson), a knight and minor noble back from Palestine, who reveals himself as Balian's previously unknown father. Godfrey persuades Balian to take up a sword in defense of the Holy Land. On the return trip, Godfrey dies, but not before knighting his son. Balian subsequently inherits his father's castle of Ibelin within the Kingdom of Jerusalem, becomes chummy with King Baldwin IV and his sister Sibylla (Eva Green), finds himself defending the Holy City almost single-handed against Saladin's horde after the Christian army's disastrous defeat at Hitton, and ultimately returns to France, where he ostensibly lives happily ever after with Sibylla, who now holds the title Queen of Jerusalem. Uh-huh. So, I picked up SALADIN AND THE FALL OF JERUSALEM to find out the real story.

Penned in 1898 by Stanley Lane-Poole, this volume is a competent and informative bio of the great Muslim leader, who was respected and praised even by his Crusader foes. Admittedly, the first several chapters dealing with "Saladin's world", and which describe the Muslim politics of the region and the events of the First Crusade prior to Saladin's birth and rise to power, make for educational, but less than riveting, reading.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Stanley Lane-Poole's Saladin And The Fall Of Jerusalem was first published in 1898, but even after a hundred years it remains one of the best overall accounts of the life of the man known to the West as Saladin, arguably the most prominent figure of the time of the Crusades. Though the book covers the entire period of Saladin's life, the ultimate focus is, as the title indicates, the Fall of Jerusalem, not only because it was the prize sought by both sides in the Crusades but because, as Lane-Poole quotes from a contemporary chronicler of the events:

"If the taking of Jerusalem were the only fact known about Saladin, it were enough to prove him the most chivalrous and great-hearted conqueror of his own, and perhaps of any, age."

For unlike the slaughter of the inhabitants carried out when the First Crusaders took Jerusalem in 1099 that literally filled the streets with blood, the re-occupation of the city by Saladin in 1187 was carried out without any acts of vengeance or retaliatory massacre. It was a remarkable act of mercy, but not the only one for which Saladin was known, and it earned him the respect and admiration of even his sworn enemies.

Lane-Poole's personal admiration for Saladin (his full name and title was Sultan Yusuf Ibn Najni al-Din Ayyub Ibn Shadlhi Abu'l-Muzaffar Salah al-Din al-Malik al-Nasir), while evident in his account of the man's life, does not impinge on his historian's professionalism. His research is well-documented and all sources are fully acknowledged, and he makes note of any occasions where his sources disagree on certain facts, and any instances where he engages in speculation in the absence of known facts.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. R. Muldoon on February 25, 2014
Format: Hardcover
It is so ridiculous to comment about the "so-called savagery of the First Crusade when they took Jerusalem. What do you think happened when the Muslims took Constantinople 400 years later? One would think conguering armies would have morally advanced in those 400 years. Yet Memhet's army slaughtered thousands of Byzantines, raped thousands of boys and women and the remaining population not slaughtered were deported to be slaves the rest of their lives. Anyone who is an apologist for the Muslim jihad need not look very far or very hard to see that no one group in the Middle East had a monoploy on savagery.Read "1453".
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again