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Salonen: "Out Of Nowhere" - Violin Concerto; Nyx [+digital booklet]

Salonen: "Out Of Nowhere" - Violin Concerto; Nyx [+digital booklet]

October 16, 2012

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Digital Booklet: Salonen: "Out Of Nowhere" - Violin Concerto; Nyx
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 16, 2012
  • Release Date: October 16, 2012
  • Label: DG
  • Copyright: (C) 2012 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:16
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B009MP4VB8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #55,953 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
The recorded sound is clear, well-balanced and full-bodied.
Y.P.
These works are wearing very well through the first half-dozen listenings, for this lifetime classical fan.
BebopGrandpop
It is modern music with a very strong feeling it is bring to me as I listen to it.
Russell C. Peterson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Y.P. on October 24, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Has the era of violin concerto as a dominating genre finally arrived? Beethoven has 5 piano concertos, but only one violin concerto. Mozart? 27+ versus 5. The piano was a dominating instrument for solo and concerto genres, but that time has long gone. Modern composers seem to prefer violin's flexibility over piano's polyphonic capacity. Evidence? Since 2004, 4 out of 9 winners of the prestigious Grawmeyer Award for Music Composition are for violin concertos (by Unsuk Chin, George Tsontakis, Brett Dean (see also Comment below for details), and Esa-Pekka Salonen), with an additional double concerto for violin and viola (György Kurtág: ...Concertante...). If we look further back, John Adams's violin concerto was also an award winner in 1995. -- How many piano concerto to have won this award? None!

Esa-Pekka Salonen has never been a revolutionary figure. He doesn't set his eyes on pushing the boundaries, in terms of forms, styles etc., despite the composer stating otherwise. (My impression anyway.) Some might complain about his "middle of the road" philosophy, but I don't agree. Salonen, like J.S.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Leif Thorsted on October 24, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Finally, three years after the premier, the Solonen Violin Concerto is at last recorded! Once again, Salonen moves music forward while honoring both the past and the present. Bartok is boldly present here. Stravinsky and John Williams are referenced as well. Toru Takemitsu and John Adams flow through the orchestral soundscape. The performance by Leila Josefowicz (for whom this piece was written) is outstanding. Her playing, as well as that of the orchestra, is better than it was at the premier.
That being said, this concerto and NYX for orchestra are Salonen's least interesting works since his pre-L.A. Variations compositions. Compared to L.A. Variations, Wing On Wing (including Insomnia and Foreign Bodies), and the Piano Concerto, this composition is thin and minimal and restrained and bare. Even the trademark Salonen blooms are purposely understated. The blooms present in the L.A. Variations, Wing on Wing and Piano Concerto albums are big and thoroughly satisfying. There is a also a comparative lack of energy here. The violin and orchestra sound as if they are not wanting to demand too much of our attention. Both tread lightly throughout, with only occasional loud outbursts. Sleek, elusive felines slinking through the darkness. Salonen has been travelling all over the world, landing and flying, living up in the air, for several years. Perhaps the works on this album are a reflection of such an existence. I will still enjoy these works often. Not nearly as often however, as his greatest works.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 25, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Having been present at the premiere of this extraordinary new work for violin and orchestra by Esa-Pekka Salonen and like the rest of the audience being swept away not only by the incredible orchestral palette and intricate orchestration but also by the sheer virtuosity of the solo work by Leila Josefowicz, there probably is no finer response in words than those of LA Times critic Mark Swed: they deserve to be quoted here. `Esa-Pekka Salonen's violin concerto is pure, euphoric poetry with a singular sound and voice. He writes in his notes that the score is a portrait of his young soloist, Leila Josefowicz, who gives an astonishingly virtuosic and visceral performance from memory. He also calls the work a private narrative, a summary of his experiences as a musician and human being at "the watershed age of 50." The concerto lasts 31 minutes and is in four unusual movements. The first is called "Mirage." The fluid violin solos have enough scale passages and arpeggios to make Philip Glass happy, something that would have horrified a young Salonen and may well still horrify some of his European colleagues. The soloist saws away, but the orchestral texture is exceptionally sparse at first - a single chord in the celesta, a note on the harp, a ping of percussion. Josefowicz is a force of nature who gradually sweeps up the orchestra along with her. Winds and percussion amplify her brilliant lines. The strings do sometimes as well, but more often back her up with glowing chords. The interplay is dynamic, but it is also sonic. Salonen knows exactly what rings and how in the hall. Harmony is his concern in this movement, and his chords are recognizably his, but they are also, at least to mind, the signature of the hall.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A stunning album!!! I love Josefowicz. Her skill is a-plus. I also love Salonen as a composer and director.
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