Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Sell Us Your Item
For up to a $2.41 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Salt Of This Sea (2010)

Suheir Hammad , Saleh Bakri , Annemarie Jacir  |  Unrated |  DVD
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)

List Price: $29.95
Price: $18.74 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $11.21 (37%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Thursday, Oct. 23? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Salt Of This Sea + 5 Broken Cameras + Occupation 101 - Voices of the Silenced Majority
Price for all three: $50.87

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Suheir Hammad, Saleh Bakri, Riyad Ideis
  • Directors: Annemarie Jacir
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Anamorphic, Color, NTSC, Surround Sound, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Lorber Films
  • DVD Release Date: June 7, 2011
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004VF66VC
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,868 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

An urgent and devastating portrait of life in Palestine, Salt of This Sea is essential viewing. Sixty years after her grandparents exile from Jaffa, Soraya (Suheir Hammad) leaves Brooklyn to live in her homeland. Discovering that her family's bank account was frozen after the Arab- Israeli way, she decides to leave Brooklyn for her homeland, determined to reclaim her birthright, through whatever means necessary. With the help of her disillusioned lover Emad (Saleh Bakri) and his filmmaker pal Marwan (Riyad Ideis), they plan on one big heist to settle the historical debt. Driving through the countryside like an Arab (and pacifist) Bonnie and Clyde, Soraya and Emad discover their roots while rejecting their status as exiles. Hammad and Bakri attack their roles with feral intensity, electrifying the screen. The first fiction feature of Palestinian-American director Annemarie Jacir, and the first feature film from Palestine by a female director, it is an intimate, urgent and rousing piece of political filmmaking.

Review

An engrossing look at a haunted landscape. --The New York Times

Brilliant, emotional... Intense and Fresh... One of the best films I ve seen in years. --Michael Moore, Director - Bowling For Columbine

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
(7)
4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
This was a wonderful movie to watch, the arabic spoken is crisp and clear and the sub-titles are very accurate. This movie shows the humiliation and brutality that is an every day reality in the occupied territories.

I traveled to the West Bank for myself and can bear witness to the facts presented in this movie. If you are a human being that cares about justice in the world, this is a movie you cannot pass up.

Salam, Shalom, Peace.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
An American woman from Brooklyn (grandparents Palestinian and evacuated (ousted is more precise) to a Lebanese refugee camp in 1948, parents born in Lebanon and emigrated to the US) comes to Israel to retrace her family's roots. She seeks the 315 Palestinian pounds her grandfather left behind in the bank. The money is long gone. The family house belongs to an Israeli woman. The house is still tiled with the tiles her grandfather laid down. She strikes up a friendship with two men in Ramallah, one of whom has not left Ramallah for 17 years. And has never seen the sea. We see her arrival at the airport and the humiliations she experiences. We see the roadblocks and the searches. The three commit a crime and escape to inner-Israel, Jewish Israel, where Arabs must have ID cards. It is an exhilarating road trip for awhile. A day at the sea, going to her grandfather's house and being invited to stay by the Israel woman who now owns it, and surprise surprise--these few days do not end well. Camping in ruins of an old Arab town which is now a national park, and this, too, does not end well.

This is the first Palestinian film by a woman. The "little murders" that occur at the hands of the occupiers are filtered through a woman's sensibility.

There is no other way: there must be a two state solution. This is not the message of the film. This is my opinion.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Illuminating October 30, 2011
Format:DVD
Anyone who has gone through an oppressive search by the TSA knows how humiliating and disempowering it can be. But, as we see in the opening scene of Salt of this Sea, it's nothing compared to the routine degradation inflicted on Palestinians by Israeli security forces.

Brooklyn-born Palestinian Soraya (Suheir Hammad) has always longed to take a roots journey back to her grandparents' homeland, from which they were forcibly exiled in 1948. But her experience turns dark from these very first moments after touchdown at the airport, when she is repeatedly interrogated and searched for no reason other than her surname. Things go from bad to worse when a British-controlled bank in the West Bank city of Ramallah refuses her request for her grandfather's long-vanished money.

She and her disillusioned lover Emad (Saleh Bakri) and his filmmaker friend Marwan (Riyad Ideis) respond to the rampant injustices by committing a crime and going on the lam in Israel, where they end up at her grandfather's old home, now owned by an idealistic young Jewish woman who has no clue as to the history embedded in the beautiful tiles on the kitchen floor.

Through the starkly discrepant treatment our protagonists receive on the streets and at military checkpoints, depending on whether or not the men are sporting yarmulkes, award-winning director Annemarie Jacir powerfully illustrates the day-to-day injustices experienced by Palestinians in Israel.

The excellent acting and cinematography allow us to forgive the somewhat incredible stubbornness of our rebellious protagonist, who insists on maintaining her honesty and political principles in spite of grave risks to both herself and her newfound friends.

Overall, this is an important film that gives witness to the experiences of a displaced minority whose perspectives are rarely seen on film. I highly recommend it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Salt of this Sea.........tastes like tears. November 2, 2011
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Fundamentally this is an epic poem on film of decades-long yearning for return to one's ancestral home...to touch the soil, breathe the air of her grandfather's stolen homeland....which Brooklyn raised Suheir Hammad, Palestinian poet /lovely actress infused with her own family's experience, perhaps. She embodies the righteous grief, alienation and longing that most Diaspora Palestinians carry throughout their lives but in this artful fiction, she not only returns but lives out the unexpressed unfulfilled need to find (and regain) her ancestral home, now occupied, as is the land itself. Through this journey 'of return' for this protagonist... walls which exist are overcome one way or another....as in any dream there is a sense of the surreal...to overcome tribulation and to succeed....this is a universal homecoming....for all who have ever coped with an unrealized yearning to go "HOME".
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category