Prime Music
Buy Used
$13.92
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Disc(s) in good condition.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.10
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Salty Dog - Plus
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Salty Dog - Plus Extra tracks, Import, Original recording remastered


See all 22 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Instantly with Prime Music Album
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, Extra tracks, Import, March 30, 1999
$18.99 $13.92
Audio, Cassette, October 17, 1990
"Please retry"

Black Friday in Music Black Friday in Music


Amazon's Procol Harum Store

Music

Image of album by Procol Harum

Photos

Image of Procol Harum
Visit Amazon's Procol Harum Store
for 73 albums, photos, discussions, and more.


Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 30, 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Extra tracks, Import, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Westside UK
  • ASIN: B00000IN3G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #263,840 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. A Salty Dog
2. The Milk Of Human Kindness
3. Too Much Between Us
4. The Devil Came From Kansas
5. Boredom
6. Juicy John Pink
7. Wreck Of The Hesperus
8. All This And More
9. Crucifiction Lane
10. Pilgrim's Progress
11. Long Gone Geek
12. Bonus Cuts: All This And More (Take 1)
13. Bonus Cuts: The Milk Of Human Kindness (Take 1)
14. Bonus Cuts: Pilgrim's Progress (Take 1)
15. Bonus Cuts: McGreggor
16. Bonus Cuts: Still There'll Be More (Take 8)

Editorial Reviews

The original 1969 masterpiece plus 5 rare bonus cuts 'All This And More' (Take 1), 'The Milk of Human Kindness' (Take 1), 'Pilgrim's Progress' (Take 1), 'McGreggor' & 'Still There'll Be More' (Take 8). Digitally Remastered from best ever sources with comprehensive annotation an original artwork reproduced. 1999. Westside.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
57
4 star
8
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 66 customer reviews
I guarantee you will be stunned.
Richard Lee
As much as I like Gary Brooker's voice, it was both Matthew Fisher and Robin Trower who gave the Procol Harum sound a fresh new feel on this album.
Kurt Harding
The work as a whole displays a maturity and an insight that most bands NEVER achieve, much less on their third album.
G. Tirebiter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By G. Alexander on October 4, 2009
Format: Audio CD
With many others, I believe that this album is one of the great and musically lasting achievements of the late 1960's explosion of rock forays into other genres and, in this instance, is almost sui generis. The melodies are, in and of themselves, gorgeous, with nary a track having the same rhythm or even instrumentation as the one before or after it. I write less to persuade, however, but rather simply to praise the remastering job. I have a German remastered CD and a recent Japanese K2HD coding remaster, which both have excellent sound, but this remastering outdoes this them. Outside of expensive remasters by Steve Hoffman (first for DCC and now for Audio Fidelity) and a few instances by Mobile Fidelity, I have never heard a redbook (i.e. plain vanilla) CD sound both so warm and yet so sonically detailed. The tracks with the full orchestra and band together are a bit less impressive from a sonic perspective but that is due only to the limitations of the available tracks and "pinging" in the recording studio at the time, and I doubt that they can be further improved with any method. The care that Salvo took, in both the remastering as well as the packaging, is especially surprising and praiseworthy in this day of reduced iPod sound. My highest recommendation.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By David A. Bede on December 28, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Most people I know either love prog-rock or hate it - except for "A Salty Dog." One of the pioneers of their much maligned genre, Procol Harum proved early on that it was possible to bring classical stylings and elaborate arrangements into rock without sounding bombastic or pretentious. Few other bands have managed to do so, and even Procol themselves didn't always live up to their own standards after their third album. But however briefly, they proved it could be done.
The title track is still the show-stopper, with its gorgeous orchestration and haunting lyrics, but it's only the tip of the iceberg. The nautical theme recurs throughout the album, most prominently on "The Wreck of the Hesperus," which features the album's most frantic musical arrangement. Cleverly tucked about halfway into the original album's progression, it serves as an unexpected climax if you listen to the songs in order. Elsewhere, "Juicy John Pink" and "The Devil Came From Kansas" serve as reminders that progressive rock is still rock and are a lasting testament to Robin Trower's influence during his too-brief sojourn with the band. Toward the end, the minor-key "All This and More" and "Pilgrim's Progress" bring things full circle with their more characteristic keyboard-driven melodies and dark lyrics.
As usual, the "new" bonus tracks clutter the setting a bit, but on balance they're a nice addition. "Long Gone Geek," a long-lost B-side, is one of the hardest rockers they've ever recorded. "Still There'll Be More" is apparently the same take found on the "Home" album, but as one of the best songs on one of their lesser efforts, it's welcome on this CD as far as I'm concerned.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Morten Vindberg on July 6, 2009
Format: Audio CD
A Salty Dog was the last Procol Harum album to feature the original 5-piece line-up. Compared to the previous two, which were very much dominated by Gary Booker's songs and vocals ( not a negative thing at all ), more space is given to guitarist Robin Trower and organist Matthew Fisher.

Robin Trower debuts as leadsinger on his own "Crucifiction Lane" and he wrote "Juicy John Pink" - both songs show the roots of Procol Harum as a tight r&b band. Trower also co-wrote the acoustic "Too Much Between Us" with Brooker - beautifully sung by Brooker, by the way.

Matthew Fisher produced the album, and arranged the orchestra for three of the songs - most note-worthy the title track, which is one of the greatest songs ever written and recorded.

Compared to Brooker's Fisher's voice may appear somewhat thin, but he sings his two songs "Wreck of the Hesperus" and "Pilgrim's Progress" beautifully, and both songs fit in nicely on the album. "Pilgrim's Progress" bears big resemblance to the classic "A Whiter Shade of Pale".

The charming "Boredom" with its Carribean rhythms is a Brooker/Fisher collaboration, adding to the great variety in styles which characterize the album.

Apart from the unique "A Salty Dog", the album features another Brooker classic "All This and More" - classic Procol Harum sound. Inspiration from the Band's recently released "Music From Big Pink", shines through on "The Milk of Human Kindness". The Band was a big inspiration for Procol Harum. "The Devil Came From Kansas" is one of the few tracks I often consider skipping over - too heavy and noisy; seems somewhat out of place on the album.

Much better is the B-side "Long Gone Geek"; another heavy thing, which sounds inspired by The Small Faces or Humble Pie.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Robert Cossaboon on June 10, 2003
Format: Audio CD
this album should be listened to and taken in deeply, because there hasn't been something this singular made since rock music became formulaic and went corporate. Salty Dog is a wonderful musical mirror of its time: it's theme is the search and journey through life; it has Sgt. Pepper-like orchestrations on the title track and the totally awesome "Wreck of the Hesperus" (I've actually been on a ship in those kinds of waters and this song gives you that same kind of giddy rush!); there are pseudo-biblical references with "The Devil Came from Kansas", and the Bunyonesque "Crucifiction Lane"; there is the eccentric/exotic xylophone driven "Boredom"; and some fine Trower guitar on "Juicy John Pink" "Milk of Human Kindness" The Devil came From Kansas" and "The Wreck of the Hesperus". The last song, "Pilgrim's Progress" will just float you along and then waft you away like a forgotten dream. The bonus tracks, the usual outtakes and alternate performances, are for enthusiasts only who like to track songs in their creative processes and in no way detract from the enjoyment of this fine album.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?