Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by bookfinders
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-library book in good condition with typical stamps and markings. Pages are clean and the binding is tight. *NOTE* Stock photo may not represent the actual book for sale.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Salvage Hardcover – March 17, 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.97 $0.01
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 307 pages
  • Publisher: MacAdam/Cage (March 17, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596922834
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596922839
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 6.1 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,619,132 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Kotapish offers in her unnerving debut a frustrating tale of a woman's struggle to keep her past from overtaking her present. The nameless narrator leads readers through the mazes of her memory, from a childhood spent talking to the ghost of her dead sister, Nancy, through her adult trauma of watching someone get run over by a subway car, and finally to Virginia, where she lives in a ramshackle house. Her cruel mother, Lois, whose sanity is also constantly called into question, becomes the axis on which the narrator's story spins in disjointed bits. The more the narrator reveals, the less reliable she becomes, calling into question whether Nancy is indeed the ghost of her dead sister or simply the personification of repressed grief and resentment. Within this aching knot of remembrance, Kotapish frequently lets her language and attention meander, stringing random thought together in unseemly pastiches that verbosely wind their way to dead ends. The novel has an overly indulgent feel, though some may appreciate the empowering ending. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

""Salvage "is a crazy, lush, tender story of two broken people...This is the kind of book you finish, tell everyone you know about it, and then realize you are ruined for anything else for awhile. Sweet misery."-- Shelf Awareness .,."breathtakingly original...Spikily funny and darkly imaginative, Salvage is an unsettling look into a troubled psyche."-- "DAME Magazine" .,."evocative and fluid...an extended exploration of the ongoing repercussions of the mother-daughter relationship in women's lives, even far beyond childhood...a revelation."-- BookReporter.com "Kotapish artfully juxtaposes with complexity and honesty the ironies of self-reliance and loneliness, of freedom and happiness, and of being independent and female."-- The Brooklyn Rail .,."witty...[Kotapish's] ferocious sense of humor--often unexpected and laugh-out-loud funny--and her consistently clever turns of phrase mark her as a writer to watch."-- Booklist "Out of Jane Kotapish's deeply poetic prose emerges a range of complex emotions and relationships that linger in the reader's thoughts...The power of the novel lies in Kotapish's unique exploration of how we come to terms with difficult childhood events and the profound impact they have on our lives."-- The Feminist Review

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
In Salvage, I fell in love with Kotapish's stylish, lyrical phrasing and imagery.
Sharon Elin
It is a literary work about the human psyche, filial love, and the inseparable weaving of the two that forms the kernel in every one of us.
Brian Seagrave
It was almost creepy at times (and this is a good thing) to be let in to the internal world of this very off-balance person.
Ronald Lavine

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brian Seagrave on May 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Reading Salvage, by JF Kotapish, is a bit like spending a rainy Sunday afternoon at the art museum, contemplating impressionist paintings, rather than going to the movies. At the museum, standing close enough to the painting to make the drowsy guard snap to attention, the picture looks blurry, like when you slightly cross your eyes or let them drift in a day trance, but up close the tiny pieces of workmanship that the painter used to tell his story are sharply in focus, such as brushstrokes and ever so slight changes of color. Standing back, from across the silent, paneled room, the painting is whole and clear, a beautiful analog to life.

The workmanship of Salvage -- the tangible, vivid and poetic descriptions of place and people, the crafty banter between friends, the processes of the subconscious hidden beneath the visual surface we observe of ourselves and the people around us -- is a delight for the critical reader. While the bizarre seminal event that stirs the subconscious of the main character -- not an accident, an incident -- jars the reader like a shove from behind, the tale in Salvage is largely not moved forward by plot but rather by the healing of the main character. If you secretly video-taped the bi-monthly psychoanalysis consulting sessions of a patient with traumatic stress disorder, then edited them down to just the patient's revelations, epiphanies, and milestones of mental health, that would be Salvage. It is a literary work about the human psyche, filial love, and the inseparable weaving of the two that forms the kernel in every one of us.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sharon Elin on April 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Some authors are magicians with words, casting spells that leave readers almost lovesick. In Salvage, I fell in love with Kotapish's stylish, lyrical phrasing and imagery. Take, for example, this description of roses on a fence: "... the roses have completed a magnificent bloom and linger like drunk women at the end of a party, voluptuous past repair, faded, sick with their own perfume." The book's plot weaves like a stage whisper throughout the novel -- the character's first-person musings and point of view reveal much more than any action, and the main theme of the novel emerges as a loose, lyrical, haunting thread that reticulates her emotional quest: the redemption of a dysfunctional mother-daughter relationship. The unnamed main character moves to Virginia to recover from witnessing a tragic accident in New York, rekindling her relationship with her often emotionally vacant parent. We see everyone and everything through this main character's eyes and emotions, with fragmented, unclear revelations of what actually happened or what is going on; for example, she frequently converses with the spirit of a stillborn sister in a closet, a puzzling derangement that reveals the extent of the character's fragile mental state. In contrast, she enjoys happy rapport with a neighbor, Edith, who is the "normal" antithesis to her own injured persona. The main character explores herself and her mother through a ruthless, probing lens, yet her descriptions remain richly sensitive, expressive, endearing, and enlightened. "Time brings a terrible revealing light to the murk. In the happy ignorance of the moment, things are what they are... Shame arrives later, a rude guest stomping in during dessert with no explanation, dripping weather onto the carpet." This is Jane Kotapish's first novel, and as an entranced reader, I consider myself a new fan.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Other on May 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover
For starters, I should say that this is my first review and that I am in no way qualified to review anything. This is just my 2 cents worth on a book I really enjoyed.

In Salvage, Jane Kotapish did a good job of taking me beyond any stereotypes I might try to assign to her book. It really got down to a human scale where I could relate to the characters. I could also relate to the story as a whole, and I think the book handles a person's internal reality versus society's mass external reality in an interesting way......Basically, a person's perception of the world collides with reality. Or in this case, is almost overwhelmed by it. All of the characters represent this theme in unique ways but together they make the book very cohesive.

So I have made it clear that I am a fan of the book, though I am a little biased for two reasons - One, as I hinted above, there is a metaphysical vein that runs through this book and I am sucker for that. But this book doesn't get too syrupy. The story is grounded in reality and there are times when the characters actions actually make you uncomfortable. The story never seems contrived, and I'd say that if you have ever had something happen in your life, which you didn't know how to cope with, then I think you will find the story very compelling.

The second reason I am biased is that I met Jane once many years ago. It was a brief conversation but it made an impression on me because she was so comfortable with herself and seemed so sure about what she was going to do with her life. We got on the topic of Joyce and she said then that she was interested in writing. Many of my friends at that time wanted to be writers, painters, musicians or something of the sort, but she is the only person I know of who actually went out and did it.

Pushing those two reasons aside, the book is simply a good read and I highly recommend it. I am now officially a fan of her work and I am looking forward to her next book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search