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Same Knight Different Channel (H) Hardcover – May 1, 2003

8 customer reviews

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From Booklist

Isenhour, an award-winning television journalist, was a seldom-used guard on Bob Knight's first Army basketball (1965-66). His premise is that the Knight we know today--controversial, temperamental, successful--was forged by his tenure at West Point when he became the Cadets' head coach at the ridiculously young age of 25. The raw material was there: a fierce competitor in high school and college, Knight was the kid skidding around the court diving after loose balls. When Army coach Tates Locke resigned to take another position, he recommended that his young assistant succeed him. Knight's inherent competitiveness flourished at West Point during the Vietnam era. He developed a style--stifling defense, patient offense--that maximized the skills of players who were not big and not heavily recruited. Filled with great anecdotes from former players and Isenhour's self-deprecating replays of his time--yesterday and today--with Knight, this is a compelling look at the early career of a man who will soon become the winningest college coach in history. Wes Lukowsky
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"A compelling look at the early career of a man who will soon become the winningest college coach in history." -Booklist --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Potomac Books; 1 edition (May 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1574885561
  • ISBN-13: 978-1574885569
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,106,256 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Bob on May 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Just like the back cover says, this isn't a love song to Bob Knight, and it's not a cheap shot to the chops. This is a fair and accurate portrayal of the fiery Coach by a player underneath him when Knight first started out.
The fact that this player will criticize Knight speaks volumes about his integrity -- and the fact that he defends him speaks volumes about his fairness. He looks at the situation without pigeonholing things into what he calls a "Bob Knight moment" that most media paint things as.
He talks about Knight's early years in coaching. He goes into more detail on Knight's firing -- and more evenhandedly than I've ever seen -- and talks about Knight at Texas Tech too. The level of access he got is astounding, and the personal touch makes the book golden.
Such a quick read too. The author had a great, conversational writing style that makes it a fun read.
Definitely five stars, the best Bob Knight book out there and the fairest one ever.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Randy Moore on June 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I have read alot of books on Knight, this book was great, Isenhour being a player for Knight in the early years gave the book an inside angle that no other author could, Isenhour tells it like it is, the good the bad and the ugly. It is a great read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Hamilton on December 23, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book gives an objective account of coach Knight at the beginning of his remarkable and continuing career. Isenhour's book is based on firsthand accounts and grounded in actual experiences and not best guesses. Knight is an extraordinry role model in perseverance and integrity despite the constant barrage of media critics. Coach Knight is a remarkable coach, demanding what more parents should demand -- academic excellence and personal excellence.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 11, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I've heard of Coach Bob Knight, but I am not a basketball fan. I got a strong recommendation of this book from a friend and I can't say that I'm disappointed that I read it.
Isenhour (or "Ike," as Knight apparently called him) writes in an extremely lucid, conversational style. Facts, historical quotes, and dates come off as something remembered over a cold beer rather than information recorded and then regurgitated for the purpose of writing a book. Honestly, I could care less about the history of basketball, but this is a very interesting book, and it kept me reading to the end.
If I had to pick something to complain about, it would be the fact that for much of the book, Isenhour seems to be extremely preoccupied by the culture of West Point itself. Of course having read (and then re-read) some of his astounding accounts of this institution, had I been raked over those coals, I'd probably be preoccupied with it, too. Don't get me wrong, the material is fascinating, it's just not about Bob Knight. Still, I'll accept the emphasis given to The Point since it offers the reader one of many explanations as to how Bob Knight came to be the way he is.
Note that I said "explanations" and not "excuses."
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