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Same Old Man


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Audio CD, May 27, 2008
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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Old Days 4:04$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Love You Again 4:13$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  3. On With You 3:53$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Hurt My Baby 4:34$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  5. What Love Can Do 4:13$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Ride My Pony 3:40$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Cherry Red 4:10$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Our Time 4:09$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Two Hearts 4:19$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen10. Same Old Man 4:04$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen11. Let's Give This Love A Try 4:11$1.29  Buy MP3 

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Biography

Forty years into his recording career, John Hiatt has chosen to title his 22nd studio album, Terms of My Surrender. Surrender? Is that as in Cheap Trick? Or Appomattox? Hiatt laughs, tentatively, at the choice.

“It’s my Appomattox,” he says, wryly. “Really I don’t know where it came from, that idea of trying to arrange the terms of my surrender. I ... Read more in Amazon's John Hiatt Store

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 27, 2008)
  • Original Release Date: 2008
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: New West Records
  • ASIN: B0013YTSDM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #63,003 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

New West Records will release John Hiatt s new full length album Same Old Man, his first album since 2005 s critically acclaimed Master of Disaster. Same Old Man was recorded at Highway 61 Recordings and produced by John Hiatt. Appearing on the album are Kenneth Blevins on drums, Patrick O Hearn on bass and Luther Dickinson on guitar, mandolin and national resonator. John s daughter, Lilly Hiatt, sings harmony on the songs Love You Again and What Love Can Do.
John Hiatt s career has spanned more than 30 years and his songs have been covered by everyone from Bonnie Raitt, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton and BB King to Iggy Pop, Three Dog Night and The Neville Brothers.

Review

John Hiatt
Same Old Man (New West)
John Hiatt's conversational lyrics sound off-the-cuff, which means they likely resulted from many hours of labour. The work was worth it, because Same Old Man ranks with the best music of Hiatt's 34-year recording career.
He sings about love in the opening round and love on the ropes, about food and paper cuts and doppelganger caterwauling. Same Old Man is sweet but not sentimental, tuneful, honest and very, very funny.
On his first release since 2005's fine Master of Disaster, Hiatt produced and engineered himself, and he puts his voice front and centre. As always, Hiatt sings like someone straining to complete the final set of the night at the local roadhouse. The raw vocals are a perfect match for such songs as Hurt My Baby, where pain is palpable as Hiatt delivers the chorus.
He's supported by bass, drums and Luther Dickinson, who plays guitar and mandolin and provides an ideal counterpoint to the vocals by making every note count. Hiatt's daughter, Lilly, contributes lovely harmony on two songs.
Dad delivers his droll lyrics as if they're throwaways, which makes them even better. I'm a long shot, baby, he sings. But they do come in. In fact, Same Old Man laps the field.
CHECK THIS OUT: On the hilarious opener Old Days, Hiatt reminisces about his early touring career and crossing paths with John Lee Hooker, Gatemouth Brown and other bluesmen. He concludes the memories aren't that sweet because I played practically free. --Associated Press

Same Old Man, John Hiatt (New West)

John Hiatt's career is long and checkered. After his first break of having Three Dog Night cover his song Sure As I'm Sitting Here, Hiatt emerged as a singer-songwriter with a particularly quirky edge.

When punk/new wave hit, he was heralded by some as an American Elvis Costello, but ignored by most. It wasn't until his 1987 album Bring the Familythat Hiatt finally got the recognition he deserved. Since that time, many other artists have had hits with his songs and Hiatt has become one of the cornerstones of Americana music.

Hiatt's latest album, Same Old Man, is about looking back. On the bouncy opening track, Old Days, Hiatt recounts his adventures opening for blues and jazz legends - sharing a room with Sonny Terry, Mose Allison commenting on his songs and John Lee Hooker sitting his two dates on the stage while Hiatt was playing his set: And that's called 'Evenin' son. I'm the headliner!

Hiatt's nostalgia is not mournful. Throughout other tracks Hiatt looks back at the best moments of a romance that has endured and looks ahead.

Hiatt has rarely released a bad collection of songs, but Same Old Man is one of the best of his career. Self-produced, the album is friendly and casual. North Mississippi Allstars' Luther Dickinson adds guitar chops. Hiatt's daughter Lilly Hiatt, adds harmony vocals on two of the best tracks and John's squirrely vocals sound better and happier than ever. Songwise, Hiatt may not be breaking new ground, but he never seems to strain for a good line. If he resorts to aphorisms, it simply sounds like natural conversation.

Sometimes being the same old man is a good thing. --Knoxville News Sentinel

When the book is finally closed on John Hiatt's fabulous career, it will only make sense for someone to etch the words Songwriter Supreme on the cover.
Hiatt has been just that for more than three decades, crafting masterpieces like 1987's Bring The Family, but more often just being the picture of consistency.

His easy-going, autobiographical writing style surfaces frequently here, starting with the twangy album opener Old Days, which recounts some of his early years on the road, including memories of stars like Sonny Terry and John Lee Hooker, the latter whom Hiatt vividly recalls as walking into a club in Washington with a woman on each arm.

This is primarily an acoustic-flavored recording, with Hiatt assisted by drummer Kenneth Blevins, bassist Patrick O'Hearn and multi-instrumentalist Luther Dickinson. Hiatt's daughter Lilly Hiatt provides sublime high harmonies on Love You Again, and the elegant What Love Can Do.

The man himself is a slight bit raspier than usual, notably on the Dylan-esque On With You, but not to worry, he's still singing with passion and clarity.

Hiatt's gift for crafting near perfect melodies is nearly unmatched and he delivers a dandy in Cherry Red, as well as on the shuffling Ride My Pony.But it is indeed the title track that provides some of the most vivid imagery and one that seems destined to be a classic.
Against Dickinson's mandolin, Hiatt sings of a long-time marriage that has endured plenty of trials and tribulations. He's particularly poignant when he sings, I'm still the same old man that you married way back when/(a) few less brain cells, a lot less hair/honey tell me do you still care?

As he states clearly, his love still stands and his loyalty endures. The same could be said for his relationship with his fans, for he's earned that loyalty 20 times over during his career. Hiatt may never be an American Idol but he remains an American treasure.

The album is also being released as a limited edition 180 gram vinyl record for all you vinyl junkies out there. --Springfield Republican

Customer Reviews

Then he tries too hard to lighten things up with What Love Can Do, (still, like any Hiatt song, it has some good lines as well).
P. Snyder
When he does start to sing a little bit, you can't help but notice that the lyrics on this title track aren't as good as the other songs on this album.
Mark
Still, one of my favorite songs on this CD is "Cherry Red," which rolls out like the Cherry Red Corvette Hiatt compares his love to.
R. Kyle

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Mark #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 13, 2008
Format: MP3 Music
This new album by John Hiatt is a very compelling work of soulful introspective ballads delivered in his signature rough voice. Overall I like the album very much. There are a few disappointments for me, mainly the title track. That aside, I like most else that is here.

It's awesome that Amazon is selling the MP3 version before the official release of the CD version. That gave me a chance to get all these songs at a great price and not have to wait for the CD to be released for shipment. Thanks Amazon!

John Hiatt has to be compared to Tom Waits because of his voice and his song-writing style. Yet he often reaches for "Dylanesque" themes and complexities. Some of his songs remind me of Willie Nelson because of his writing style and under-stated delivery. His voice has that gutteral feel of Joe Cocker or perhaps an elder Johnny Cash with more roughness. This is not music for the masses but rather music for those who are willing to really work to appreciate a great song-writer despite cosmetic flaws. In fact, the roughness of John Hiatt actually adds a lot of character to the music. Like I said, not for everybody, but for those who do get over the hesitation well worth the price of admission.

John does have a very cult-like following, once again very similar to Bob Dylan and Tom Waits. Sometimes it seems that his fans believe he does no wrong. Well here some mistakes seem to have been made.

The title track "Same Old Man" sounds like a roughly sung pop song instead of the powerful song-writing we get with John's best stuff. It starts flat with him almost speaking the lyrics. When he does start to sing a little bit, you can't help but notice that the lyrics on this title track aren't as good as the other songs on this album.
Read more ›
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jim Wink on May 27, 2008
Format: Audio CD
John Hiatt

"Same Old Man" (New West)

John Hiatt's conversational lyrics sound off-the-cuff, which means they likely resulted from many hours of labour. The work was worth it, because "Same Old Man" ranks with the best music of Hiatt's 34-year recording career.

He sings about love in the opening round and love on the ropes, about food and paper cuts and "doppelganger caterwauling." "Same Old Man" is sweet but not sentimental, tuneful, honest and very, very funny.

On his first release since 2005's fine "Master of Disaster," Hiatt produced and engineered himself, and he puts his voice front and centre. As always, Hiatt sings like someone straining to complete the final set of the night at the local roadhouse. The raw vocals are a perfect match for such songs as "Hurt My Baby," where pain is palpable as Hiatt delivers the chorus.

He's supported by bass, drums and Luther Dickinson, who plays guitar and mandolin and provides an ideal counterpoint to the vocals by making every note count. Hiatt's daughter, Lilly, contributes lovely harmony on two songs.

Dad delivers his droll lyrics as if they're throwaways, which makes them even better. "I'm a long shot, baby," he sings. "But they do come in." In fact, "Same Old Man" laps the field.

CHECK THIS OUT: On the hilarious opener "Old Days," Hiatt reminisces about his early touring career and crossing paths with John Lee Hooker, Gatemouth Brown and other bluesmen. He concludes the memories aren't that sweet because "I played practically free."
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By P. Snyder on July 21, 2008
Format: Audio CD
John Hiatt goes for what he tried on Crossing Muddy Waters eight years ago -- mostly acoustic guitar with some mandloin and slide thrown in, but with more bass and percussion this time, a kind of laid back country blues. It's what he's best at, along with his widely acknowledged lyrical skill, which he uses to great affect here. The first four tracks are stellar, alternately funny and touching, with Hurt My Baby providing an emotional wallop. Then he tries too hard to lighten things up with What Love Can Do, (still, like any Hiatt song, it has some good lines as well). Ride My Pony is a more affective stab at optimism -- toe-tapping, deceptively simple, brilliant. The rest of Same Old Man is hit and miss, as Hiatt songs go; some of it harkens to earlier tracks. But the songwriting, particularly on the title track, shows Hiatt has mellowed nicely, is as insightful as ever, and can always be counted on for a clever turn of phrase.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jef Fazekas on July 31, 2008
Format: Audio CD
John Hiatt reminds me of a pair of well-worn slippers...comfy, yet supportive, reliable and dependable. On his new release, the wonderful SAME OLD MAN, Hiatt suggests that a long term love can also often be seen the same way....comfortable and secure, yet often taken for granted. One needs to tend the garden, so to speak, in order for everything to continue to grow, no matter how in bloom it may all seem. On SAME OLD MAN, a concept album of sorts, Hiatt sings about the effort, care and struggles that goes into such an endeavor. Opening up the disc is the rollicking "Old Days." Full of pluses and minuses ("Old days are comin' back to me/I don't know what was so great about 'em/I played practically free/But I had nothing to live up to/And everywhere to be"), the past can both haunt and mystify us. With his trademark growl and sardonic wit, Hiatt tosses off this relaxed shuffle with ease and joyous abandon. Throw in hysterical lyrics ("On a date with John Lee Hooker/At a joint up in Washington/He came in with a gorgeous woman on each arm/As I was singing my song/Walked 'em right up and sat 'em on the edge of the stage/As I went singing along/And that's called 'Evenin' son, I'm the headliner'"), and you have one of Hiatt's best songs to date. A total winner! "Love You Again" is a gorgeous ballad that just opens up like a musical rosebud as it unfolds. A simple arrangement, a powerful lead vocal and killer harmonies from daughter Lilly all come together in a way that is both stylish and heartfelt. Add some sensitive lyrics ~ "I'd forgotten how to be patient/I'd forgotten how to caress/I'd forgotten how to ask for help/And how to struggle for my best" ~ and you have another Hiatt classic! Things just continue on this strong note with the slinky, sly "On With You.Read more ›
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John Hiatt at his best.
I agree too!!! My dad bought a John Hiatt tape for me when I was just entering 7th grade. I think it changed me and my outlook completely. The great think about John is he doesn't even fit into my regular music style, but you can't deny his lyrics and voice are pure magic!!!
Jul 8, 2008 by A. Spearman |  See all 3 posts
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