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Same River, Different Water: A Veteran's Journey from Vietnam to Viet Nam Paperback – May 4, 2012


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Paperback, May 4, 2012
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 190 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (May 4, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1467906921
  • ISBN-13: 978-1467906920
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,098,983 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Douglas Young spent his youth fighting a war in Vietnam. Educated at Florida Southern College, Young accepted a commission as an infantry officer, serving two different tours of duty; the first in 1966-677 with the 199th Light Infantry Brigade, the second in 1969-70 with the 1st Cavalry Division. After meeting the love of his life at the 24th Evacuation Hospital in Vietnam, Doug married the former Lieutenant Cynthia Mason in 1971. Never one to stay settled, Young started his post-army life as a police officer in Atlanta, Georgia, including a four-year stint as a homicide detective. An accomplished pistol shooter, Young moved on to teach firearms at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center near Brunswick, Georgia. Loving the challenge of starting something new, he and Cindy moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he worked at a training academy for the U. S. Department of Energy. He found time to earn his Master’s degree in Teaching and Learning Technologies at the University of New Mexico, and then moved to a new job as a distance learning coordinator for a consortium of colleges and universities in Texas. Once again, the call of the new and different moved him to accept a position at the University of Texas Pan American in south Texas, retiring in 2004 as the Director of the Center for Distance Learning. Young retired earlier than most people, but only so he could continue with his passion. A return trip to Viet Nam in 2002 sparked a latent interest. A dream was born and the two moved to Viet Nam where they taught English at the University of Hue in 2005-06. Wanting to see the young minds they had taught get the best education possible, Cindy and Doug have assisted Vietnamese students in coming to the United States for graduate work. An ardent photographer, Doug works as a freelance sports and features photojournalist for the Progress Times newspaper in Mission, Texas. Cindy and Doug are practicing, believing Christians who worship in the Episcopalian tradition at St. Peter and St. Paul church, also in Mission, Texas.

Customer Reviews

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I felt myself tearing up as I read the book.
DrTom
A must read for anyone that has any interest at all in the subject.
Kenneth G. Bopp
A must read for all veterans of the Vietnam War...it is uplifting.
Leigh Fairbank

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth G. Bopp on May 12, 2012
Verified Purchase
I received my copy two days ago. It took me that long to read it as, at times the print became very blurry and I had to rest and wipe my eyes. One of the most insightful books about veterans, Doug and Cindy, and the country from both views. Both from the Vietnam War and Viet Nam after the war. Sifting through the stories of war time brought back a lot of memories for me. Bitter sweet I must say. Hence the tears. The realizations that eventually came to Doug, and Cindy, as they taught and interacted with the Viet Namese is very uplifting. Do They Hate Us? Did You Find the Battlegrounds Where You Fought? Did You Meet Any VC or NVA? Is the Country Pretty Much Destroyed? Many questions have been answered by Doug. As I said, a most insightful look at the veteran, (both Doug and Cindy are vets) and the country. Goes to the top of my pile of books about the war, both academic and biographical, and I have quite a collection. Kudos for one of the best written and most informative books about the Vietnam War and Viet Nam. A must read for anyone that has any interest at all in the subject.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By DrTom on May 10, 2012
Same River Different Water is a very special book. I received my copy yesterday and could not put it down. My wife was reading it at 5:30 this morning because I wouldn't put it down last night.

My wife and I are friends with Doug and Cindy Young. I'm a Vietnam veteran having served 19 months with the 108th artillery supporting the 101st Airborne. Doug re-introduced me to the beautiful country on my first trip back in 2005.

The thing I love about Doug's book is it's a very personal look at the people and culture of Vietnam that most people do not get to see. Any of us can travel or study a country, but it is almost impossible to really get to know the country in a few weeks or a month. Doug's pictures and writing take the reader inside Viet Nam for a very personal look at a beautiful people and country. I felt myself tearing up as I read the book. Viet Nam has become a place I love and Doug describes this feeling of love so clearly.

Doug is an excellent photographer. His photos help illustrate his story and the beauty of the amazing country. The photos also help describe a warm and friendly people that love westerners.

This book is far different than a veteran's view or a travel guide. It's a look inside a country's soul and a veteran's soul at the same time.

Thomas E. Murray, Ph. D.
University of Central Florida
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By hanoibelle on May 29, 2012
Verified Purchase
I lived in Hanoi for 7 years. 'Same River, Different Water' would have been a tremendous orientation tool for understanding the mystery and beauty that is Vietnam. Even now, the book is full of 'ahas!' and sweet memories and fabulous pictures. Doug's prose is rivaled only by his photography. This book is a gem.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jay Phillips on October 17, 2012
"Welcome Home" is how we Vietnam Veterans greet each other - and Same River, Different Water: A Veteran's Journey from Vietnam to Viet Nam, as the subtitle implies, is one veteran's return, both physically and spiritually, to the land where he once fought a war and now finds peace. Most American veterans of the war in Vietnam have only the memories of a usually hostile, occasionally terrifying, and almost always mystifying and backward land. But gone, along with almost all of the thatch huts and massive bomb craters, are also all feelings of animosity toward Americans. If only every ex-GI could read this book and find out how far Viet Nam has moved beyond not only the war, but even most memories of those troubled times, he or she would relish a visit to that wondrous land.

Doug Young is clearly in love with Viet Nam and its people and that feeling is reflected as much in the splendid photographs he provides as in the telling of his story. There are many insights here about life in Viet Nam today, as well as a deep well of information about how westerners may adapt to this alien climate and environment. While there is much here that will inform those who once patrolled the "boonies" of Vietnam of how different indeed today's country is from the one of their experience, there is also an absolute wealth of content for non-veterans who simply want to have a westerner's view of what it is like to visit and to live in Viet Nam today.

Hopefully, this won't be this author's last work on this topic, as his reflective writing leaves one full of wonderful insights - and wanting more!
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