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Mr Sampath-The Printer of Malgudi, The Financial Expert, Waiting for the Mahatma Kindle Edition

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Length: 618 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“The novelist I most admire in the English language.” –Graham Greene

“Few writers since Dickens can match the effect of colorful teeming that Narayan’s fictional city of Malgudi conveys.” –John Updike

“The hardest of all things for a novelist to communicate is the extraordinary ordinariness of most human happiness…Jane Austen, Soseki, Chekhov: a few bring it off. Narayan is one of them.” –The Spectator

“The experience of reading one of his novels is…comparable to one’s first reaction to the great Russian novels: the fresh realization of the common humanity of all peoples, underlain by a simultaneous sense of strangeness–like one’s own reflection seen in green twilight.” –New York Herald Tribune Book Review

“Narayan is a writer of Gogol’s stature, with the same gift for creating a provincial atmosphere in a time of change…One is convincingly involved in this alien world without ever being aware of the technical devices
Narayan so brilliantly employs.” –The New Yorker


From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

R K Narayan's writing spans the greatest period of change in modern Indian history, from the days of the Raj - Swami and Friends (1935), The Bachelor of Arts (1937) and The English Teacher (1945) - to recent years of political unrest - The Painter of Signs (1976), A Tiger for Malgudi (1983), and Talkative Man (1987). He has published numerous collections of short stories, including Malgudi Days (1982), and Under the Banyan Tree (1985), and several works of non-fiction.

Product Details

  • File Size: 925 KB
  • Print Length: 618 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1400044774
  • Publisher: Everyman's Library (July 22, 2009)
  • Publication Date: July 22, 2009
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002IPZJU6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #400,108 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vincent Poirier on January 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The three novels gathered in this omnibus edition make an excellent introduction to the works of Indian writer R.K. Narayan. The novels all take place in the fictional Indian city of Malgudi. They each offer a mix of wisdom, comedy, pathos, tragedy, romance, and action.

"Mr. Sampath" is a coming-of-age novel but one with a particular Indian twist. The main character Srinivas is sensitive but immature, but he isn't lost or even dissatisfied. He needs to be prodded unto the path towards manhood by his elder brother. Maturity is acceptance of one's lot but by participating actively in the world around us.
(Full review: http://www.amazon.com/review/RTLQDSWW758JX/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm )

"The Financial Expert" is a comic novel about an unsympathetic swindler who is nevertheless mature and wise in his own way. We might not like him but it's difficult not to empathize and understand him.
(Full review: http://www.amazon.com/review/R13JRCPQAS18D3/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm )

"Waiting for the Mahatma" is a modern historical novel of India achieving independence. Narayan wrote it soon after the events and Indian history serves as a backdrop to the story of a young couple in love; they in turn can be seen as symbolizing India and the Mahatma. Narayan paints an intimate portrait of India rather than an epic canvas.
(Full review: http://www.amazon.com/review/R2ZKYGNE4CQQBY/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm )

This is a gorgeous edition by the way. Cloth bound hardcover book printed on acid free paper and with a bookmark ribbon attached. It feels good to hold and smells nice.

Vincent Poirier, Tokyo

Links to separate editions of each novel:
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Three Novels by R. K. Narayan is comprised of three short novels, Mr. Sampath-
The Printer of Malgudi, The Financial Expert and Waiting for the Mahatma. All of the novels are set in the fictional Indian city of Malgudi.

Having recently read A House for Mr. Biswas, I was somewhat familiar with many of the cultural and lifestyle practices of the Indian people and this collection is very similar in style and content to that earlier noted work by V. S. Naipaul. Narayan is one of the most widely read and critically acclaimed Indian writer and this is, by all accounts a sampling from one of his most productive periods.

In Mr. Sampath- The Printer of Malgudi, we are presented with an industrious, young newspaper publisher who falls in with Mr. Sampath, the printer of his periodical. Through a series of circumstances and machinations, our young publisher is swept along in a whirlwind of characters and events that ultimately leads him to the pinnacle of success as a movie screenwriter before the obvious house of cards predictably comes crashing down.

In The Financial Expert, we are introduced to a sly, manipulative money lender who has eked out a modest living on the backs of his clients. Desirous of greater wealth and riches, the loan shark experiences a completely unexpected and inexplicable financial windfall which changes his life completely. In the background of this major career move is the relationship between he and his family, including an incorrigible and ne'er-do-well son.

The final novel in the collection, Waiting for the Mahatma, follows the story of a young man in Malgudi, living with his grandmother, who has come into his modest inheritance. He soon falls under the spell of a young woman who is a member of Gandhi's entourage.
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By R. Rockwell on November 13, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
.R K Narayan provides the most complete view of the Indian soul to the outsider, with his many novel all set in the town off Malgudi. Admired by Graham Greene , I am sure you will enjoy this collection of the novels by one of my favorite authors and an excellent introduction.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E.J. Kaye on February 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Fascinating writing that deals with people and situations that can only happen in India. I really enjoyed these novellas, and I think it provides a window into a culture that too few Americans get a chance to understand.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By anonymous2 on January 24, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Mr. Sampath - the Printer of Malgudi was a mess. The story was all over the place and, in the end, not that enjoyable. Moreover, the story was more about Srinivas than Sampath. Not a good read. The Financial Expert was somewhat better. The main character, Margayya, desperately wants to be rich, to be noticed and have others show him the respect normally given to people with position in society. He is, however, the sucker born every minute and wants wealth to come to him simply by paying homage to the Hindu Goddess of Wealth. RNK's transition from discussing business dealings to a discussion of his supposedly great love (somewhat hippocrytical) for his son is awkward. RKN spends too much time discussing the details of Margayya's brat son's poor school performance and how it will reflect on his own status in society. He then then spends a whole page discussing Margayya's attachment to his umbrella. To me, this means the author doesn't have anything to write about and is padding for pages. Margayya and his son Balu quarrel over grades and Balu runs away from home. As long as Margayya is making $$$, he doesn't give Balu much thought. When he receives news Balu was killed (later found not true) in an accident, he is more concerned about how he could make $ charging well-wishers to find out what the excitement was about in his house. Moreover, he did not want to travel to Madras to inquire of the details of his son's supposed death b/c he might lose out on some profitable business transcactions. Margayya is a despicable man who eventually does attain wealth (and eventually loses it) and then complains about the unwanted attention and stress that came with it. Some of the things I objected to probably reflect certain Indian cultural norms of the day.Read more ›
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