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Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML and CSS in One Hour a Day: Includes New HTML5 Coverage (6th Edition) Paperback – September 3, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0672330964 ISBN-10: 0672330962 Edition: 6th

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HTML5 and CSS3 Web Publishing in One Hour a Day, Sams Teach Yourself (7th Edition)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Sams Publishing; 6 edition (September 3, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0672330962
  • ISBN-13: 978-0672330964
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 7 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #457,365 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML and CSS in One Hour a Day, Sixth Edition is the latest edition of the worldwide bestseller. The entire book has been thoroughly revised and refined to include new detailed coverage of HTML5, the next major revision of the core language of the World Wide Web, HTML. Work on the HTML5 specification is still ongoing, but parts of HTML5 are already being implemented in new versions of Microsoft Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Safari and Opera.

About the Author

Laura Lemay is the world's most popular author on HTML and web development topics. In addition to the best-selling Teach Yourself Web Publishing books, and she is also co-author of Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days and Teach Yourself Perl in 21 Days. Rafe Colburn is a programmer and author working in North Carolina. He is the author of Special Edition Using SQL and Sams Teach Yourself CGI in 24 Hours and co-author of Sams Teach Yourself Perl in 21 Days.

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Customer Reviews

This is a good book on CSS and HTML.
AverageReviewer
Although, for many this will be the perfect book, for me and most others, its just too complicated to follow.
Scott
I have worked through about half of the book now and I found it to be very easy to read and well organized.
Nor'easter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Yu-Jin Chia TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 31, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As its title suggests, this is an introductory text. It makes a decent beginner's reference as well, but assumes little to no knowledge of web technologies and is clearly geared toward non-professionals. That said, it is a very well done introduction to Web 2.0, including some discussion of HTML5, and has a good breadth of coverage.

Similar to other Sam's books (most of which are great for beginners) the text is divided up into chapters that take about an hour to finish. It starts with very simple stuff such as the basic HTML/CSS tags and progresses to advanced topics like AJAX and scripting. If you've been awake during the last ten or so years, you can safely skip the introduction. Most of the common HTML 4.x tags are covered in depth, including some that have fallen into disuse. Notes are made regarding what will be supported in HTML5, but most of the discussion is limited to compatibility. This isn't a book on HTML5 or CSS3, which makes sense as of now since neither of those are widely supported yet. Aside from some brief discussion of the <video> tag, you probably won't learn much about the new standard itself.

Each chapter is built around a short exercise with code snippets and explanation. It is done in a step-by-step manner that's very easy to understand.* Additional reading and exercises are noted at the end, if you care to learn more. Aside from HTML, topics range from page layouts to basic scripting (JS/PHP), embedding movies, and content handling. It even touches on some frameworks like JQuery and swfobject. The authors generally shy away from browser-specific optimizations and syntax, which is probably a good thing as some of these can cause serious issues. They also discuss some legacy features that you might see (e.g.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Walker VINE VOICE on January 25, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Laura Lemay has been writing "Teach Yourself" titles on web development topics for more than 15 years now, several of which I have read, enjoyed, and learned from. Having finished this updated edition of her "Web Publishing", I am happy to recommend it to HTML novices, but not without criticism and caveats.

THE GOOD: The first two parts of the book constitute a solid HTML primer written in a friendly, "only as technical as is necessary" style, moving into more complex web programming topics in later chapters. Best practices and compliance with the emerging HTML5 standard are emphasized throughout the short self-study lessons. Further, the closing sections of the book provide sound "real world" advice on topics like hosting, marketing, and publishing platforms.

THE IFFY: I felt that CSS was introduced rather clumsily, as if the authors took their old HTML 3.2 lessons and swapped in CSS code for the deprecated visual markup tags. Will confused newcomers persevere until Lesson 13 when the big picture is finally explained?

THE NOT-SO-GOOD: Visiting my local bookstore confirmed that the minor (but fairly frequent) syntax and spelling errors were not confined to my review copy. Less forgivable is the reference to Appendix B, "HTML Quick Reference", on page 150. Appendix B does not exist.

BOTTOM LINE: On page 538, the authors state that "visitors aren't going to have much patience if your web page is poorly organized or full of spelling errors." Again on page 543, "Spelling errors and bad grammar reflect badly on you, on your work, and on the content you're describing. It may be irritating enough that your visitors won't bother to delve any deeper... even if the subject you're writing about is fascinating." Applying these stated standards to the book, I would encourage Ms. Lemay and Mr. Colburn to demand an apology from their publisher.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By MyBeesWax TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 7, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Having been a Web developer a while back, I wanted a reference book that serves as a refresher on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) -- and this book fits the bill perfectly. However, for someone who has no prior knowledge of HTML and CSS, this book comes up a little short. While it may be quite comprehensive in the topics it covers, it lacks a certain cohesiveness that would allow a beginner to use it as a practical guide for real world Web publishing. First, let's talk organization.

- Organization
This book has made a heroic effort to be comprehensive by attempting to cover everything from basic topics (e.g. tables, forms) to intermediate topics (e.g. embedding videos, absolute vs relative position, layers) to more advanced topics (e.g. Javascript [arrays, data types, loops, etc.], relational databases, server-side programming). That's all well and good, but it sometimes goes into so much of the nitty-gritty details that a beginner can easily lose sight of the complete picture. I feel it would be much better if the book had given a birds-eye view to get a beginner up to speed with the overall framework of a Web page before it went into the details.

- Practicality
The book barely touches on some important topics such as WYSIWYG editors (WYSIWYG is the acronym for "What You See Is What You Get" - pronounced wis-see-wig). *Real world* Web publishing use WYSIWYG editors (such as Adobe Dreamweaver) and other tools to expedite the development of Web sites. Hand-coding Web pages from scratch is almost never done.
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