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170 of 177 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally no more calls from my mother
I decided to order the Chrome Box after a long decision making process. My mother who is close to 80 was always calling me about a virus, forgotten password, virus software or firewall message, foo-king windows update etc. the list goes on and on!
My mother only uses the PC for email, Facebook, and her games like Farmville (Ah!) so I thought this would be a great fit...
Published 24 months ago by mr pickle

versus
116 of 130 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, with some issues.
I was getting ready to buy a new desktop when the chromebox came out, so this was a perfect opportunity to give it a try.

Overall it's a nice web browser. It boots fast, was easy to start using, and is great for doing anything on the web. The interface is pretty much like windows 7, but a little simpler.

I was having a grand old time playing with it,...
Published on June 5, 2012 by J. Guidry


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170 of 177 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally no more calls from my mother, July 17, 2012
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
I decided to order the Chrome Box after a long decision making process. My mother who is close to 80 was always calling me about a virus, forgotten password, virus software or firewall message, foo-king windows update etc. the list goes on and on!
My mother only uses the PC for email, Facebook, and her games like Farmville (Ah!) so I thought this would be a great fit for her needs. Shortly after unpacking the Chrome Box, plugging in her old USB mouse, keyboard then old monitor it was up and running (after an initial update that took about ten minutes).
I had her create a Gmail account and she was quickly on her way. This really does boot up between 5 and 7 seconds ... amazing! She was able to play all of her games on Facebook, Farmville and Bejeweled (Ah! Again), and all her other sites. After seeing some of the reviews I was concerned about some sites not working. Went to CNN and had her click on several videos and repeated this on the Yahoo news site, video ran better then on my expensive machines.

My mom now lives happily inside the Chrome browser and I have a lot more free time! no more phone calls, snicker snicker:)
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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very happy with zero administration computer, August 3, 2012
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
I just purchased my 4th chromebox today for our business. I also have 2 chromebooks (since June 2011) for a total of 6 Chrome OS devices. I am a business owner and a Google Apps for business customer. Also, understand that we are not just Apps users, we are fully engaged/entrenched. We use Google Apps to it's fullest including using Google Drive like a file server and Google Cloud Print for printing services and Google Voice/Chat. For a guy like me, these are dream machines. These are used in a business environment. I am the owner of a small business with 14 employees. When I say these are dream machines, I mean they are dreamy for me as the owner/IT guy/bathroom cleaner guy/light switch operator guy, etc. I always hated IT issues and the last computer on the network, the one the person puts their hands on, is always the one that consumed the majority of my time. We use(d) Windows, Mac, Ubuntu, and now Chrome OS. My employees now fight over the Chrome OS devices. The absolute simplicity of the is truly remarkable. As the IT guy, I don't even have to remove it from the box. It arrives from Amazon, and I hand it to the person and tell them to login with their gmail credentials. That's it. Done. They log in the first time and there is their browser, opened with their tabs, bookmarks, password credential, auto-fill settings, printers, etc. My job is done.

This is kind of a side note of elation. With our accounting, CRM, and ERP software all provided as a service in a browser, Google Drive allowed me to shut down our last server (except for SIP-VOIP and Scanner/Document). We are server-less (except the afforementioned). Now all I have to maintain is a DHCP server. I hate to sound giddy, but, really I am. This is the future.
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116 of 130 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, with some issues., June 5, 2012
By 
J. Guidry (San Diego, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
I was getting ready to buy a new desktop when the chromebox came out, so this was a perfect opportunity to give it a try.

Overall it's a nice web browser. It boots fast, was easy to start using, and is great for doing anything on the web. The interface is pretty much like windows 7, but a little simpler.

I was having a grand old time playing with it, but a number of issues came up of basic things that just didn't work.

The main issue so far is that it doesn't support USB audio. I have three USB audio devices that didn't work. (integrated microphone/webcam in monitor, wired and wireless visa USB dongle headsets) What this means, in layman's terms, is that you would not be able to video chat without buying new equipment - you'd need to buy a headset with a single speaker/mic jack, like the old cell phone head sets used to have. Then you'd have to unplug your speakers and plug in your headset each time you wanted to chat.

When the Chromebox is powered off, but plugged in, it sends a huge buzz through the speaker cable that is unliveable. This doesn't happen when the computer is asleep; just powered off

After that, there's just a long list of little things... things like forward/back buttons on the mouse not working.

Overall, this is a nice little thing to play with, if you like new electronic toys. But, I wouldn't buy it for Mom just yet.
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42 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm liking it, October 20, 2012
By 
D. M. Carson (Los Angeles, California) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
For the past few months, I'd been looking for a new home computer to replace my aging MacBook Pro. As I began to consider my options and take an inventory of how me and my wife were using our home computer, I began to realize that a Chromebox might be a good option for us. I bought one (with an i5 processor) off ebay for $300 a couple of weeks ago (as opposed to the $329 retail models that come with a Celeron processor), and now that I've had it up and running for a few days I can give a report. I think for a lot of people, it might be a good alternative to a Windows or Mac PC.

In considering whether to get a Chromebox, I read a lot of commentary about them, most of it negative. The main argument against them makes a lot of sense: why would you buy a computer that only runs the Chrome browser and nothing else, when for more or less the same price you could buy a PC that will also run the Chrome browser, but in addition has the potential to do a million and one other things as well? If you really like Chrome so much, just buy a cheap PC and download the Chrome browser.

I think it's a good argument, but it was ultimately unpersuasive to me.

Let me start by describing what me and my wife actually use our home computer for. When I started to think about the idea of a web-only computer, I realized that we are actually Google's target customers: we spend nearly all of our computer time in the cloud. Surfing the net is of course the main activity, but after that it's pretty much email, Facebook, Youtube, uploading and sharing photos, and Pandora, in more or less that order. The only major sort of higher-level activity that I (aspired to) do is access my corporate server through a remote desktop application. One of the things that drove me to upgrade my home computer was that my Power PC-era MacBook was no longer able to access my corporate server remotely because my OS was too old for the current remote desktop applications. I have used Mac's proprietary desktop software to edit photos and record music over the years, so that's was maybe the one area of hesitation.

So to review the other options, starting with Windows PC's, after decades of using them at work, I've always been basically of the opinion that I would never lay down my own hard earned money to buy one for myself. I've just always found Windows PC's to be buggy, clunky, noisy, slow, apt to crash, etc., and this is based on thousands of hours of use. They also come bundled new with a lot of weird software that you can't fully use unless you pay for it, corporate stickers all over the place. Yuck.

Now, I hear Windows 7 has solved a lot of that, but even then, Microsoft is not gearing up to release Windows 8, and I'll tell you right now, I have no interest in a touch screen desktop. That's just idiocy, IMHO, although knowing my record on stuff like that, everyone will have one in five years or so (along with back problems). So, did I really want to invest in a soon to be obsolete Windows system, when they are in the process of "upgrading" everyone to a new system that I have no interest in using? Just starting the process of thinking about that is enough to make me revert to my default position which is, "no Windows PC's in my house".

The other thing is that yes, I could probably buy a cheap Windows desktop for something close to $300, but to actually utilize any of that additional non-Chrome browser functionality would require me to start purchasing software. MS Office alone can run to $500. Furthermore, if you look at the Chromebox's [URL="(...)"]benchmarks[/URL] (especially the i5, but even the Celeron-based one), you would almost need to buy an i7 Windows PC to significantly match the speed of the Chrome browser running on the i5 Chromebox, and i5 Windows PC to beat the Celeron, in both cases spending way more than $300. There are also not too many Windows desktops that are going to look good in a living room, where I currently have my desk set up.

Next there's Mac OS. I've had a succession of Mac's as my home computers continuously for the past 25 years, and they are good computers, no question. But I don't like how Apple tries to route everything through iTunes, increasing the complexity and difficulty of accessing your files in the process (even limiting your access to your files in some ways), and I don't want to be locked into iTunes for all of my media. I'd also prefer to stay out of Apple's "walled garden" as much as possible, because it just means spending more $$ on everything, especially hardware.

Speaking of $$, to get a basic iMac with minimal third party software and an Apple Care contract, etc., runs close to $2000. My dad just laid down $4K for a MacBook Pro. Those figures are definitely in a different category entirely from a $300 Chromebox with no need to buy any software. And the thing is that I did pay $2000 for my MacBook Pro and software several years ago, and then the optical drive broke, and then the OS went out of date and my processor didn't accommodate the new OS, and etc., etc. Mac OS is a great operating system, but the plain physical realities of computing still apply, and no matter how much you spend, it will become obsolete in a matter of time. Given that my main computing is done at work, the idea of having an expensive machine sitting idle on my desk all day, losing value just through the passage of time, is not appealing. Mac Mini is a little cheaper, but still twice the cost of the Chromebox.

Then there's Linux. Perusing the various forums that talk about Linux, the problem seems to be that there are all kinds of versions out there, and the various open source software that you find may or may not be compatible with the particular version that you're running. And even if it's compatible today, it may not be tomorrow when both sides of the equation are updated. More fundamentally, however, I'm not tech-savvy (facing a command prompt would stop me dead in my tracks in whatever I was trying to do), and I hear that you end up needing to tweak around on Linux a lot to make it work right, no matter the version.

So . . . my Chromebox. The first thing is that it's a nice looking, small form factor. It's very small, about the size of a wireless router, and it looks great in my living room, where I have my desk set up. It's got plenty of in's and out's, with six USB's (two on the front and four in the back), a DVI, two Display Ports, and an audio jack. I flipped it on and it recognized my display immediately, updated itself to the latest Chrome OS and browser in a couple of minutes and asked for my Gmail password. I put that in, and in a couple of more seconds, and I was on a desktop with one-click access to the Chrome browser, Gmail, whatever doc's I had on Google drive, and Youtube. Nice.

Surfing around the web was of course a pleasure. Very fast. Lightning fast. Downloading Youtube clips, complex web pages, whatever. I would expect that surfing the web on a Chromebox would be great and it absolutely is. Definitely the best I've experienced for myself on any system.

The best thing, though, about the Chromebox so far, however, is the Chrome Web Store. I really don't know how the business model for it is going to ultimately work, but right now, there are thousands of Chrome extensions and applications that are available for free. Because they are not even downloading to your desktop, adding and deleting them from your browser takes seconds. This I think is the most revolutionary part of the Chromebox experience. Whereas on a traditional desktop, adding new functionality means buying potentially expensive software, hoping it's compatible, spending time downloading or uploading it onto your hard drive, hoping that it works as intended, encountering significant hassles many times if it doesn't work, and you need to delete it, and get a refund, hoping you don't overload your hard drive with too much weight, hoping if you downloaded it, that it didn't come with virus, or some other weird program that infects other parts of your system, figuring out what updates you need and which ones you can (or should) ignore, sometimes having to pay for updates, etc., etc., on the Chromebox, if you want a new functionality, search for it in the Web Store, add it to your browser in seconds, and if it doesn't work right or you just don't like it, delete it in even less time. It's similar to Android, except even with Android you still have to download the applications onto your phone.

The other advantage is that all of the extensions and applications that I load into my Chrome browser at home will travel with me wherever I happen to log in to Chrome. So if I need to do something on my work computer, if I log in to the Chrome browser, I will have the same functionality there. If I log in on my dad's MacBook while visiting home, it will be there.

To illustrate how well this works, when I informed my corporate IT that I was planning to access the server remotely using the Chromebox, they asked me to bring it in so they could configure it properly. Generally remote access requires that software be installed on both computers. When I brought it in, he started tweaking around, switched it into developer mode, started using command prompts, etc., and I suggested just checking for an HTML5 remote desktop extension in the Chrome Web Store. Lo and behold, there was a third party one there. We switched the Chromebox back out of developer mode and restored everything and then just added the HTML5 RDP extension, which took five seconds. It took another 30 seconds to fill in the required fields (domain, password, etc.) and voila!, I was on the server with a perfectly functioning remote desktop.

IMHO, if Google was smart, they would buy out the best one of the third party HTML5 remote desktop extensions in their Web store and make it a standard part of the browser. A properly functioning remote access capability improves the usefulness of a web-only computer exponentially, for those who have work computers with the full MS Office suite, etc. Google's own Chrome remote desktop application requires that it be installed on both computers, something that my IT department and I suspect many others was not willing to do at this point. But whatever, as I said, it took less than a minute total to configure my Chromebox to allow me to access my corporate server remotely, and it works beautifully.

Another nice feature is that the starting point on the Chromebox is a log-in screen allowing for I assume an unlimited number of users. Once you log-in under your Gmail account, then all of your browser configurations, email accounts, passwords, etc., all set up automatically. When my wife logs in, it's then completely under her settings and configurations. The configurations could be so different, it's like we have two totally different computers. There's also a guest log-in if someone wants to browse, but in doing so, they wouldn't have any idea what you've been doing with your computer. Very nice.

I also really like the idea of automatic and frequent updates. I've always been very confused about updates on a home computer. Is it really something I need to spend time dealing with? Is it going to improve my performance, or degrade it? Is it really some third-party trying to install a virus or malware or phish me? Is my computer even compatible with it? It's a pain and hassle, and the upshot is that I was never fully updated on my MacBook. I like that Google is just going to keep my computer continually up to date in all aspects without my even thinking about. Yes, they may install something that will snoop on me or whatever, but I just can't worry about that right now. I need my computer to be working, and I don't need to be spending my time and even sometimes money keeping up with nothing other than the passage of time.

The unit is very quiet. The only time the fan has come on was when I was uploading loads of photos. Otherwise, the processor seems to be able to handle the duties without getting too hot. The audio coming out of the 3.5 mm jack sounds good so far. I've heard there are issues with getting audio out of the DisplayPort outputs, but I haven't tried that yet, so I don't know. I think it's software-related though, so hopefully Google has it under control.

There is a basic file system in the OS itself to allow you to see files on the various drives inside and outside of the computer. I like it better than freakin' iTunes. It's very simple, but the files are there, easy to access, properly identified. What else do you need? I spent a couple of hours today uploading months of photos from my camera to Shutterfly, and it worked great.

If anyone is interested in buying one, the one recommendation I would make is to NOT buy the Samsung Chromebox keyboard and mouse. The mouse is nice, but the keyboard is inferior to a decent standard Windows keyboard (and it doesn't come in wireless). The Chrome-specific functionality would still be there on a Windows keyboard, it's just that the F keys won't be labelled correctly. You could either memorize the functions, or maybe get little stickers and put them on as reminders until you did. The Chrome-specific keys are basic anyways -- back, forward, full screen, brightness, volume, etc. If I had to do it again, I would buy a nice wireless Windows keyboard and mouse combo, especially one where they both can use just one USB port, in order to save them for other purposes.

A lot of reviewers have mentioned, and I would probably agree, that it would've been nice if Samsung had included a USB 3.0 port or two, since with only 16GB onboard, it seems inevitable that at some point you may want to have a big external drive connected to it. I also can't speak to any differences between my unit and the Celeron Chromebox, though I suspect that it's not a big deal. It would have to be much, much slower for it to not still be a very fast slick system.

So, there you have it. There's at least one family out there for whom the Chromebox seems to be a viable alternative to a Windows or Mac desktop computer.
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118 of 135 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Update: Returned due to Speaker Hum, May 31, 2012
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
Updated: Returned the item after trying to eliminate the audio hum with a ground loop isolated filter. This eliminated the problem 60%....but still annoying and a defect in electrical design.

Someone else has also pointed this out in a more recent review.

===============

After experimenting with the Chrome OS and Chromebooks for a bit, I began to assess my computing needs; at my home and mobile.

At home I find myself only internet surfing, reading online magazines and emailing. As an IT person, I have built many PC's, Hackintosh's, etc., all with the latest and greatest specs...but again....at home found myself only surfing the internet or reading email. What a waste of dollars and computing power. For mobile use, and to do the heavy lifting of productivity applications including word processing, photos, games, etc., I have a MacBook Air....which is perfect.

I started to think along the lines of simple internet access for my office at home, and shifted toward Chrome. The Chromebox is the perfect solution to anyone looking for basic online computing for a home desk....someplace you just want to go to, surf a bit, and not have excessive hardware or horsepower. It is absolutely perfect in this role. The Chromebox is silent, fast, has great graphics and appears to be built well.....and best off....there is no guilt in having spent much money for features and horsepower you will never use...(that is unless you like buying excessive horsepower to make up for other deficiencies! ha!)

I would like to point out one issue. When my unit is powered off, the speakers (Bose Companion 20's) sound a loud hum. It is a ground-loop issue. While is easily resolved by using a ground-loop isolater in line to the speakers from Radio Shack....it is inexcusable that this defect in electrical design, exists. A second resolve is to simply keep the unit powered on....and there is no hum.
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great internet PC, June 2, 2012
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
If you want an ultra simple, cheap desktop for Internet use, you'll like the Chromebox. It's probably the easiest computer ever to set up--I had mine unpacked and running in something like 2 minutes: plug in keyboard, mouse, and monitor, and turn it on. The only configuration you need is to enter the Wifi password of your home internet, and then you're done. I'm looking forward to not worrying about viruses, backups, manual software upgrades anymore :-)

The box is quite snappy when browsing with Chrome, it's definitely not an underpowered low-end device.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fast, Easy, Green, but Limited Readability Adjustments, June 17, 2012
By 
Alan (Hyattsville, MD USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
I am an experienced computer programmer and have used a number of different computers and operating systems. My overall impression of the Google Samsung Chromebox is that it's one of the best ways to get on the internet. It is fast, easy, and makes it easy to conserve energy.

How I've used it:
--Checked my e-mail (said happy birthday to my brother)
--Got directions to a local playhouse to see Fiddler on the Roof
--Checked the balance on my bank account
--Watched videos of political commentary
--Allowed my daughter to listen to lectures for her online university course
--Ordered things from online stores such as Amazon and others
--Got weather reports
--Read Wikipedia articles on American History

I'm trying to make the point that although this is "just the internet," getting on the internet is the main reason I use any computer anyway. People may wonder why anyone would spend "all that money" just to get on the internet. You buy a Chromebox not just to get on the internet, but always to be able to get on the internet.

Because Google protects and maintains your operating system continually and for free, you have no virus worries, and you know your system will always work no matter who has been using it. No more humiliating phone calls to tech-savvy family members to drive over and untangle the mess that somebody made.

It boots up in less than 10 seconds. I can turn it on, log in, check my e-mail, and turn it off in less than 60 seconds. A lot of people choose to set their computer on hibernate or sleep so they don't have to wait for the computer to boot-up later. You can leave the Chromebox turned off because it will only take a few seconds to boot up the next time you use it. In this way, the Chromebox makes it easy to conserve energy.

Pros:
--Fast boot-up time
--No virus worries
--Has icons for links to Chrome web browser, G-mail, Google Docs, YouTube, and a main menu.
--The main menu contains quick links to Google services such as Google+, Calendar, Hangouts, Music, Games, and Tips and Tricks.
--Ability to log in as guest
--Ability to download files onto your separately purchased USB flash drive
--Has a built-in speaker
--Plays MP3 files from flash drives

Cons:
--No ability to install JAVA! This means some gaming websites do not work. Other gaming websites, such as Yahoo Games, Club Penguin, etc. DO work, though. It depends on the site and the game.
--No ability to install Silverlight
--No ability to install any software as you know it. You have the ability to download something and upload it to an online storage space, but you cannot actually install it on the Chromebox.
--No desktop programs such as Microsoft Word, but Google Docs is available.
--Although you can enlarge text within the web browser, I have not found a way to enlarge it in other places yet.
--The scroll bars for the web browser are very pale and difficult to see-- makes manually scrolling difficult.
--I could not find an option to adjust the screen resolution (I am using an Acer 23 in monitor, which is pretty big, but didn't help)

Although I might have had my doubts about purchasing an internet-only computer, I have to say that Google has done a fantastic job making a reliable, easy-to-use internet experience. I just wish there were more options for screen readability.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very fast performance, July 4, 2012
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
I very much like my new chromebox, and have used it for almost all of my internet surfing and email since I received it, the only exception being to print things (which is not often). The boot up time is only a few seconds, and the updates occur without me noticing. Also, the chromebox is very quite, and the internal fan comes on only rarely, typically during periods of high graphic activity, but even then the sound is very quiet. Total power draw is also very low, around 10 watts. I appreciate the extent to which the hardware has been redesigned from the ground up, with no legacy hardware or software to support, which adds to the speed and security. Like the chromebooks, there is a trusted platform module chip in the chromebox that adds to the security of the overall system.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for Public Use PCs, May 30, 2012
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
Chrome OS and its associated hardware is really a new category of internet device that being a surfing appliance. It really is as simple to use as a toaster that you simply use and forget about till the next usage. Previous attempts at this were called thin clients for the enterprise user but this is the first one for the average consumer sponsored by Google. Any comment comparing its limitations to your normal MS or MAC PC is simply missing the point of this device which is usability and a hassle free appliance experience. This is what a PC would have been for the consumer if MS had not invented DOS and its subsequent Windows OS.

When you want an OS that excels in the two key areas of security and Web interaction yet you don't want the public to modify it or hack it to the detriment of other uses Chrome OS is certainly an option to consider. Two user areas that come to mind are libraries and schools where users throw anything they can think of to hack their PCs. This in turn causes the constant need to spend money on refreshing and fixing these PCs in two economic areas that can least afford to fund that support. A third area that needs to keep PC support to a minimum is small businesses. There are also several Linux OSs that meet this same criteria but they do not have the backing that Google has and continues to improve this product. If this purchased without the fee based management console you have only one option to present to the user that of a guest which presents a vanilla chrome browser. Coming is a kiosk mode that allows the owner to customize the chrome browser for the user.

I believe that the continued Google support will depend on how many of the above users realize the benefits of the OS and migrate to it over time. It was unfortunate for Chrome OS that the tablet wave crested when it was first released but it would not suprise me that Google merges Android and Chrome OS in some future release.

As for consumers if you have a use of a PC that mirrors the above users then given the support in depth Google offers it is now a viable option to be your primary PC. Time will tell for Chrome OS but given the brand of Google behind it I think anyone who buys one and has the proper match to its functions will be pleasantly surprised over time...........
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Overall positive, but mixed feelings, July 9, 2012
By 
Miftah Khan (Hillsborough, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Samsung Series 3 Chromebox (Personal Computers)
Positives
- Super easy to set up. Literally took a couple minutes.
- Super easy to maintain and administer. I'm tech support in my family, and this makes my job a whole lot easier. No more worrying about viruses and computer slowdowns.
- Supports camera photo uploads and external USB drives
- User interface is simple and easy to use for non-technical types
- Super fast system. Quick boot time, quick shutdown, and no lagginess.

Negatives:
- No Skype support. Google Hangouts is support, but see the second issue below.
- If you use a USB webcam for video conferencing, you're out of luck. There's no support for USB audio and no ETA for making this available. What this means is that people can see you, but not hear you. This is ridiculous considering how much Google advertises their Hangouts feature.
- The File Manager is very barebones, and it's not as user friendly or functional as Windows Explorer on PC or the Finder on Mac.

[EDIT July 23, 2012] Upgrading from 3 stars to 4 stars since Google has added USB webcam support and Google Drive file manager support in the latest beta release.

One more thing I'd like to add... A number of people have complained about a speaker hum. I haven't experienced this at all with my unit. It's super quiet and cool.
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