Samuel Ramey sings Opera Arias

June 26, 1989 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 3, 2003
  • Release Date: June 26, 1989
  • Label: Warner Classics
  • Copyright: (C) 1989 EMI Records Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:02:55
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000TDDHPS
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #47,307 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Bravo, Mr. Ramey!
Martin W. Eldred
Folks who like this album might check out a couple of recitals on Teldec, one of French items and one devoted to Rossini.
Stanley Crowe
Samuel Ramey has a marvelous voice and has the musicianship to use it well.
Alan Beggerow

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Martin W. Eldred on August 12, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I am usually suspicious of singers that are currently on the media's "hot list" since they are often more hype than true talent. Samuel Ramey, however, is wonderful proof that a truly great singer can also be a media darling. Famous for his "devil" roles and his bare chest, Ramey is also simply one of the best male singers of our era (in any range). This is a great recording from a great singer and one that highlights some fantastic, but lesser known opera arias. As a fellow bass, I appreciate hearing some of "our" music, but I also enjoy the break from the usual opera record of the same old tenor or sporano arias. Basses usually get the short shrift in the opera world, especially in the recording industry, which is such a pity since the arias on this recording deserve to be revered as much as any more famous tenor collection. This is simply great music and Ramey is a marvelous interpreter of these songs. Ramey has gone a long way to show that we basses do more than play what I call, "dads, bads, and priests", but also contribute some exceptionally great music to a night at the opera. Bravo, Mr. Ramey!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Parks on October 27, 1998
Format: Audio CD
There is a reason that Sam Ramey is an opera star. This cd gives you a glimpse as to why. He can flat out sing.Few Bassos in Opera History have displayed his virtuosity of style and technique.From Mozart, to Rossini, to Gounod, to Verdi, Maestro Ramey can cover the emotional and musical depths that are presented to him.If you want gorgeous sound as well, he has it in spades!! Sam has "set the bar" very high indeed for those who would follow!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Miss Jane on February 10, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I won't mince words, and I will spare you a highly technical commentary: this recording is simply beautiful; Ramey's singing is, as always, magical. If you enjoy opera and are looking to try something other than the much more mainstream "Three Tenors" variety CD, this will be one you'll treasure. The other one to get is Ramey's recording of Rossini arias. Magnificent!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By V. Chau on April 27, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This recording shows Samuel Ramey in excellent form. He sings superbly in each aria. The Verdi arias tend to lack the last bit of emotional abandon, but Ramey sings them very well. A few arias allow us to hear his voice's excellent agility. Ramey has excellent Italian and French diction. The "Calunnia" aria is right up his alley. A particularly nice surprise was the short selection from "La Damnation de Faust". Samuel Ramey can sing and it is no wonder why he became a major operatic superstar.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Lovitt HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on August 3, 2014
Format: Audio CD
Samuel Ramey, the greatest coloratura bass of the 20th Century sings eleven selections by Verdi, Rossini, Berlioz, Meyerbeer, and Donizetti in this 1989 EMI recording, with Jacques Delacôte conducting the Münchner Rundfunkorchester .

Many competent operatic basses could have sung some of the selections on this CD, such as "La callunia" from Rossini's "Il barbiere di Siviglia" although without Ramey's elegance and velvety tone. However, two of the most devilish roles in this collection belong to Sam, alone: Bertram from Meyerbeer's "Robert le Diable" and Mephistopheles from Berlioz' "La Damnation de Faust." You may have heard Sam reprise these roles on his 2002 CD, "A Date with the Devil" but you really need to listen to him here in "Opera Arias," in his dark and glorious prime. Bertram (a devil in human form) is an especially complex role, and Sam sings two of his arias. In the first, "Encore un de gagné" he gloats over his conquest of a naive minstrel whom he has tempted with gold. In the second, "Voici donc les débris" he tempts his own son, Robert in the ruins of an ancient convent.

A much more tender mood prevails in the selection from Verdi's "Simon Boccanegra" where Sam mourns for his deceased daughter in "A te l'estremo addio...Il lacerato spirito." "Elle ne m'aime pas" from Verdi's "Don Carlos" is even sadder. Beautiful Verdi sung by a superlative bass.

Don't confuse this CD with the Philips version of "Samuel Ramey: Operatic Arias." The Phillips recording has Sam on its cover dressed (undressed, actually) as the world's sexiest Attila the Hun.
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Format: Audio CD
The USA has its share of great sopranos and baritones (Ponselle, Price, Tibbett, Warren, Hampson), but it has come up a bit short on basses and mezzos. Right now we have Susan Graham in the latter category -- but has there been a great American bass? There certainly have been very good ones -- Jerome Hines, Ezio Flagello, Paul Plishka, John McCurdy, and James Morris -- but I think Samuel Ramey is special. Partly its the sheer quality of his voice at his peak, and partly its the breadth of the repertoire. Here is a man who can handle florid Rossini stuff, was an exemplary Mozartian, could do Donizetti, Verdi, Puccini, and the verismo operas, and who took on Mussorgsky as well. There are a couple of "crossover" recordings (especially the Rodgers and Hammerstein album) that give an idea of his voice's power, beauty, and security. The disc under review was an early recital disc, basically introducing the singer to the world around 1989. There has never been a better account of Silva's aria from "Ernani" (with a stirring cabaletta) and the arias from "Don Carlo," "Nabucco," and "Simon Boccanegra" are very fine too. Off the beaten track a bit are interesting items from Meyerbeer's "Robert Le Diable" and Rossini's "Le Comte Ory." Folks who like this album might check out a couple of recitals on Teldec, one of French items and one devoted to Rossini. The material on them is less familiar, but the performances are just as rewarding. Generally, I don't like "rating" things -- but I break my rule for Ramey, the pride, I hope, of Colby, Kansas -- though when I drove past the Colby exit on the interstate, there was no big "Birthplace of Sam Ramey" sign! Get it up there, Colby!
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