Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 
$29.98 + $3.99 shipping
In Stock. Sold by dmkrr

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Sell Us Your Item
For up to a $2.85 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Samurai Trilogy Box Set (The Criterion Collection) (1967)

Toshir˘ Mifune , Mariko Okada , Hiroshi Inagaki  |  Unrated |  DVD
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (107 customer reviews)

List Price: $69.95
Price: $29.98
You Save: $39.97 (57%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by dmkrr.

Other Formats & Versions

Amazon Price New from Used from
Blu-ray 2-Disc Version $38.98  
DVD 3-Disc Version $38.99  
  3-Disc Version $29.98  
Deal of the Day: Up to 55% off "Pacific Rim Collector's Edition" and "Predator Bundle"
Today only, save up to 55% on the ""Pacific Rim Collector's Edition and the "Predator Bundle." The offer to own these bundles ends July 30, 2014, 11:59 pm PST. Shop now

Frequently Bought Together

Samurai Trilogy Box Set (The Criterion Collection) + Seven Samurai (The Criterion Collection) + Yojimbo & Sanjuro: Two Films By Akira Kurosawa (The Criterion Collection)
Price for all three: $107.96

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Actors: Toshir˘ Mifune, Mariko Okada, K˘ji Tsuruta, Kaoru Yachigusa, Michiko Saga
  • Directors: Hiroshi Inagaki
  • Writers: Hiroshi Inagaki, Eiji Yoshikawa, Hideji H˘j˘, Tokuhei Wakao
  • Producers: Kazuo Takimura
  • Format: Box set, Color, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: Japanese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Criterion
  • DVD Release Date: May 18, 2004
  • Run Time: 300 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (107 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0001UZZT0
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #154,137 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Samurai Trilogy Box Set (The Criterion Collection)" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto
Toshirô Mifune defines the quintessential samurai in Hiroshi Inagaki's 1954 Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto, the first feature in a trilogy based on the epic novel by Eiji Yoshikawa. As in Kurosawa's classic Seven Samurai, which appeared the same year, Mifune plays a brash and ambitious peasant who desires fame and power as a swordsman. His dreams of glory in war sour when his army is routed and he becomes hunted by the authorities, but the "tough love" attentions of a kindly but severe monk help him develop from a hot-tempered outlaw to a thoughtful swordsman. Inagaki's somber color epic is very different from the energetic action of Kurosawa's films. The sword fights and battles are practically theatrical in their presentation, staged in long takes that emphasize form and movement over flash and flamboyance. Mifune brings a sad, almost tragic quality to the samurai warrior Musashi Miyamoto, whose dedication proscribes him to a lonely life on the road. Though the film stands well on its own, its stature takes on greater significance as the first act of Inagaki's stately, contemplative epic of the professional and spiritual development of Musashi.

Samurai II: Duel at Ichijoji Temple
Picking up where Samurai I left off, Toshirô Mifune's samurai in training Musashi Miyamoto is a wandering swordsman who hones his skills in a succession of duels. When he defeats a succession of students from a local school of martial arts, he becomes marked for death by the school elders and is attacked in a series of cowardly ambushes. Romantic threads from the first film become further complicated when the virginal Otsu (Kaoru Yachigusa) and the sad courtesan Akemi (Mariko Okada) meet and discover their rivalry and Musashi earns himself an archenemy, an ambitious young swordsman named Sasaki Kojiro (Koji Tsuruta) who vows to defeat Musashi to make his name as the finest fencer in all of Japan. Inagaki ably manages the rather complicated plot with unexpected ease (subtitles are employed to help English viewers make a few narrative jumps) while he charts Musashi's education in compassion and humility and his internal struggle with his conflicted love for Otsu. The direction is still as distant and unostentatious as in the first film, while the color and settings become richer and more pronounced: studio-bound locations take on the quality and delicacy of paintings. The dramatic centerpiece of the trilogy, an epic pre-dawn battle where 40 swordsmen ambush Musashi, uses darkness and landscape to great dramatic effect as figures seep in and out of the picture

Samurai III: Duel at Ganryu Island
Toshirô Mifune is confidence supreme and humility incarnate as the mature samurai master Musashi Miyamoto in the final film of Inagaki's sprawling trilogy. Now a legendary swordsman whose latest quest is to save an isolated village from rampaging brigands (shades of Seven Samurai), he remains haunted by the memory of Otsu (Kaoru Yachigusa). Meanwhile the ruthless and increasingly jealous Kojiro Sasaki (Koji Tsuruta) plots his battle royal with Musashi to prove who is the finest fencer in Japan. Inagaki weaves the web of subplots into a series of grand confrontations, among them the most exciting battles of the trilogy: Musashi's skirmish with the army of cutthroats while the village erupts in a fiery inferno around him, and the sunset duel between Musashi and Kojiro on an isolated beach, the two warriors taking on mythic dimensions silhouetted against the sun setting over the surf. Inagaki's delicate use of color throughout the series becomes most pronounced in this final sequence, where the glow of orange and red adds dramatic flourish to the twilight battle. Inagaki's reserved, restrained style and Mifune's melancholy performance--his granite face and stocky stance the very essence of somber wisdom and sad assurance--bring a gravity and seriousness to the drama that ultimately illuminates the personal cost of Musashi's supreme skill as his story ends on an elegiac but hopeful note. --Sean Axmaker

Product Description

Based on the novel that has been called Japan's Gone With the Wind, Hiroshi Inagaki's acclaimed Samurai Trilogy is a sweeping saga of the legendary 17th-century samurai Musashi Miyamoto (portrayed by Toshiro Mifune) set against the turmoil of a devastating civil war. Now available for the first time together in a specially priced gift pack, the films follow Musashi's odyssey from unruly youth to enlightened warrior in an epic tale of combat, valor, and self-discovery.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
60 of 62 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
The content has been summarized by others. For the person who has not seen these films, the summary cannot convey the content of these 3 films.

In short, the story of perhaps the greatest master of Japanese sword skill ever, a historical/almost mythical figure from 1600 feudal Japan.

The 3 movies tell of his evolution from a young hot head with exceptional ability, to a master of both his martial art and of life from a Japanese Shinto perspective.

These films are full of Japanese culture and mentality.

The actors are spell binding.

The fight sceens are believable and of the highest standard. (No, the actors cannot walk up walls!!! and fly through the air!!!).

The story for me, was and is deeply moving.

Do not misunderstand, my insight and identification does not parallel that of the main character, but it is a story which has become part of me.

I do not know if this will appeal to every one.

It is in Japanese with subtitles.

Some parts of the film become slow.

Nonetheless, for me, this is a masterpiece and one of my all time favorites.

It is timeless.
Was this review helpful to you?
33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blu-ray: AMAZING transfer and picture June 24, 2012
By Rider
Format:Blu-ray
Blu-ray picture is simply amazing, especially considering this film is almost 60 yrs old. Many scenes are so crystal-clear and detailed you truly feel like you're actually there as an observer instead of watching a film. Detail is razor-sharp; you can see intricate fabric textures and very fine face details in closeup shots. In carefully-lit interior scenes, color is rich but not over-saturated; outdoor scenes are good but not quite as vibrant. Insert says "These new high-definition digital transfers were created on a Spirit Datacine from 35mm low-contrast prints struck from the original camera negatives." Also color fluctuations, scratches, splices, jitter, flicker, etc. were corrected.

Highly recommended - definitely a big step up from the DVD version.
Was this review helpful to you?
98 of 109 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Regarding the films and the DVD transfer November 13, 2004
Format:DVD
While I don't think these films are quite up to the level of the other great Japanese samurai films of the 1950s (such as Sansho the Bailiff & Seven Samurai), the really great things about the Samurai Trilogy for me were in the marvelous use of natural surroundings, the attractive Japanese leading ladies, and above all being able to see Toshiro Mifune starring in color.

Regarding the DVD transfer, let me first say that I am a frugal guy who does not think that any DVD, however good the transfer, is ever worth 30 bucks. That said, I don't know what all the fuss is about over the image quality on these disks. The film was not released in widescreen so the full-screen image is correct. The only scenes which are perhaps too dark are in the end of the second film, because it was filmed that way originally! The VHS is even darker as far as I could tell. I have 20/40 vision, yet I had absolutely no problem reading the subtitles ever in any of the three films. The image quality in general is not Jeanne d'Arc but it certainly never came close to impairing my ability to enjoy the films. Finally, there are no special features beyond theatrical trailers on any of the DVDs, but the three-pack is also priced cheaper than any other Criterion issues (less than $20/disc) so why complain!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much Improved over previous iterations June 26, 2012
By zeb
Format:Blu-ray|Verified Purchase
The main thing missing is the much anticipated commentary track. I got so used to Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, and others that I got spoiled with. I know this is not a Kurosawa masterpiece but it's still a masterpiece on its own. Wish they had a commentary track with Stephen Prince. Anyways...for each of the 3 films, William Wilson, gives the historical info on the real Musashi Miyamoto and how it relates to the film where many parts are fictitious for entertainment purposes and you'll find them in the "supplements" section.

They put the 2 bluray discs on one spindle which is divided top and bottom and the booklet on the left side on a single bluray case. I have a slight gripe about this set up. First, the films can't be sold separately because 2 movies are on 1 50gb bluray dual layer and the 3rd movie is on the 2nd bluray 25gb single layer. So, wanting a collector's item goes right out the door due to not having individualized packaging just like Yojimbo and Sanjuro.

The films are in it's original 1.33:1 aspect ratio at 1080p HD and amazon's listing at 1.77:1 is incorrect. When viewing on your widescreen TV, you'll see 2 black bars to the sides just like Seven Samurai. The picture quality is definitely leaps and bounds superior to that of the 2004 criterion DVD release. The colors are vibrant and the contrast is maxed out. Almost feels like I'm watching something new entirely. Some might be turned off by the heavy grain quality but keep in mind this film is old. In todays standards with recent films, the grainy quality would be unacceptable. Audio has been improved as well with a noticeable higher Mhz monaural. If you're watching on a 120Hz or 240Hz refresh rate TV, go ahead and turn them off, it gets distracting with the blurriness of movements.

Recommended.
Was this review helpful to you?
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the great Toshiro Mifune June 4, 2005
Format:DVD
I do not wish to compare these films to the works of Kurosawa as others have done (of course they aren't as modern or innovative) but to assess their impact as a trilogy and as a great realized vision of a historical figures' spiritual development. Their are not too many trilogies that hold together this well - maybe 'Star Wars' gives us this sort of vision as well. Toshiro Mifune, of course steals the show, and is very convincing in this kind of role. The cinematography is quite nice (especially in the first and last film) and we get to see a lot of beautiful natural images throughout the film - I am reminded of the Japanese love for nature that has been written so much about (read D.T. Suzuki's 'Zen and Japanese Culture' as another fine example). Overall, I am satisfied with this purchase. I think it has the power to inspire.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Like Samurai? You'll want this . . .
Like Samuri movies and don't mind subtitles? Then you miss seeing this series and if you see it you're going to probably want to see it again sometime. Read more
Published 8 days ago by R. L. Hume
5.0 out of 5 stars Samurai trilogy box set
Toshiro Mifune portrays the young and upcoming samurai warrior Miyamoto Musashi in each DVD. It chronicles his wayward up bringing and eventual master swordsmanship culminating... Read more
Published 10 days ago by Michael Richardson
4.0 out of 5 stars Not the best Musashi films but very good
Toshiro Mifune gives a solid performance in his role as Musashi. The movie roughly follows Yoshikawa's novel. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Charlie Cycle
5.0 out of 5 stars Of course bad ass
Mifune is a badass. Try watching all three in a row. Samurai trilogy marathon, if you are bad ass enough to handle all three!
Published 1 month ago by jon raby
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect!!!
I originally saw this trilogy on The Independent Film Channel (IFC) and loved it. I realized it was originally produced in the 1950's but the IFC presentation was good color and... Read more
Published 2 months ago by G. Warnock
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Movie
This trilogy has been a favorite of mine since I was very young, the life story of perhaps the most loved Samuria in history. Musashi Miamoto. Thank you Daniel of Nebraska.
Published 2 months ago by Daniel of Nebraska
5.0 out of 5 stars samurai series
i am very happy with this product. there is a little story booklet that comes with this. this set actually works. Read more
Published 2 months ago by ronnie007
5.0 out of 5 stars awesome quality
First, I knew nothing about these movies. I had become a Toshiro Mifune fan though. From the minute I was blown away by the awesome picture and other qualities.
Published 2 months ago by C. Hammer
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding picture quality
Being a huge fan of Toshiro Mifune and these 3 films I have owned them all in variios guises (VHS, DVD) for years and was slightly hesitant in purchasing yet again as the previous... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Samuraimike
3.0 out of 5 stars Cultures Are You This Is For You
You find it to be interesting if you like japanese movies especially culture related you may find this a hard run as the movie are subtitles but if you read or speak Japanese you... Read more
Published 4 months ago by Amazon Customer
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category

dmkrr Privacy Statement dmkrr Shipping Information dmkrr Returns & Exchanges