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59 of 68 people found the following review helpful
Capacity: 240 GBVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I now own this Extreme II SSD.

I also own a 240 GB SanDisk Extreme SSD where Windows 8 was installed. This is the original Extreme not an Extreme II.

I copied the original Extreme(full Win 8 backup) to this new Extreme II drive and did a comparison. I would struggle, in real world testing, to be able to tell you what the difference in speed does for me between these two drives.

That's going SanDisk Extreme SSD to SSD. If you are still running on a platter based hard drive, the speed boost seen either in the Extreme II, or the now less expensive Extreme, is absolutely one of the best choices you can make in order to make your PC (that's Mac or Windows based PC) perform at a level you can't see with a platter drive.

What I recommend is to buy an SSD for the OS and apps. Use a platter based drive, 1 TB+, for all of your media and files. I also highly recommend a physical USB3 backup drive to backup your data as well.

So what's the difference on paper between the Extreme and the Extreme II? Random reads and writes are roughly 40% faster on the Extreme II. Random reads are only 7% faster. Sequential reads and writes are about on par, with the Extreme (original) eking out about 10 MB per second better than the Extreme II. If I had a choice though, the Random Read/Write, being both a lot, and a little, better on the Extreme II, and if there was price parity, I would go with the Extreme II. You do more random reads/writes than sequential, generally speaking. You aren't likely to really notice the difference in practice moving from one to the other, unless you do a lot of hard drive intense operations.

If you are a gamer, just go with the Extreme II now. You may not notice the differences in the real world, but when it comes to performance, if you are a gamer I will always recommend the best you can afford, and right now, the Extreme II in my mind is one of the best options available.

So in the end, if you already have an Extreme SSD (or similar performer from other manufacturers), you probably can avoid the upgrade. If you don't already have a performance focused SSD, or have a platter based hard drive only, I highly recommend the Extreme II (or even the original Extreme).
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2013
I recently got a brand new laptop (Lenovo ThinkPad T431s) that comes with a Toshiba 7200rpm HDD so I decided to get an SSD to speed things up because I got tired of waiting for applications to load. So I decided to go with a SanDisk Extreme II 240 GB and man, SSD's will make any computer feel like it's from the future. The ThinkPad T431s is already fast because it comes with 4GB of ram and a core i5-3337U but swapping the HDD with an SSD made it 100x faster. I feel like HDDs really hold back a computer's performance. The SanDisk Extreme II 240GB literally blew me away by the performance that it has. My Windows 7 disk experience score went from 5.4 to 7.9 which is the highest it can go on Windows 7.

I do a lot of backups and transfer large files with my laptop and it used to take forever when I had my HDD but now everything is blazing fast. I know that this product literally came onto the market just a few days ago but it seems it's receiving very good reviews and so far I'm very impressed! When I was on the HDD, I would get around ~5hrs of battery life but now I'm getting around 6-7hrs. I travel a lot so battery life is very important to me and being able to have an extra 1-2hrs is awesome. This SSD is quite an improvement from my Toshiba HDD that I had before in my laptop but I'm really impressed by how lightweight this new drive is and how fast it.

It also generates almost no heat and is obviously silent to the ear. I couldn't stand the weird noises that my Toshiba HDD would make during the night. The access and read speed are as advertised and I did a benchmark with CrystialDiskMark, the results are below. I use my laptop for video editing/web development so I use programs like Adobe After Effects, Dreamweaver and Photoshop quite a lot. My work-files are usually quite large (2GB+) and it used to take forever to load them when I was using my Toshiba HDD but now it takes less than a second to open them with the SanDisk Extreme II 240GB.

The installation process is very simple. You just have to make sure to enable AHCI in the BIOS (not IDE) so the SSD can work like it should. Also, make sure you flash the latest bios for your motherboard first before you install this drive. I was getting half the advertised read/write speeds but once I flashed the latest BIOS for my motherboard, it was all good. Another important thing to do after installation is to install the latest SATA drivers and chipset because it makes a huge difference. I got 100MB+ in read and write after installing the latest SATA drivers.

I never get to see the entire Windows boot animation with this SSD which shows how fast this thing is. Windows 7 starts in ~6 seconds and shuts down in less than that. Everything opens immediately and applications load super fast and run great. I have disabled indexing, prefetch, defrag and hibernation because they are not needed when using an SSD. I have even gone ahead and completely disabled page file because most people recommend it to disable it since SSDs are already fast enough and benefit from it. I would recommend you keep page file if you are on a HDD but not on a SSD. You also save a ton of free space if you disable page file which is great.

These are the speeds that I got when benchmarking it with CrystalDiskMark:

---------------Read ------- Write

Sequence: 531.26MB/sec --- 493.21MB/sec
512K: 281.48MB/sec ------- 453.32MB/sec
4K: 33.19MB/sec -----------161.21MB/sec
4K QD32: 376.21MB/sec -----321.33MB/sec

As you can see from the result above, the speed that this SSD delivers is right up there with the big dogs.

Pros:

+ Longer battery life in a laptop.
+ Sturdy
+ Great Packaging
+ Blazing Fast
+ Cheaper than the competition
+ Fast boot times/applications

Cons:

- None

Overall, I highly I highly recommend upgrading to a SanDisk Extreme II 240GB if you are still on a HDD. If you are using a HDD on your laptop and want to make your computer feel like brand new then upgrade to an SSD. The SanDisk Extreme II 240GB made my laptop feel like it was from the future with the blazing fast speed. I also got an extra 1-2hrs just from upgrading to an SSD. The quick boot and super fast load of applications is amazing. The SanDisk Extreme II 240 GB is also a tiny bit cheaper than the competition.

My Main Rig:

Case: Corsair 900D
GPU: EVGA GTX Titan
CPU: Intel Core i7 4770K @ 4.6Ghz
PSU: EVGA SuperNOVA 1000W
Ram: Kingston 16GB of RAM
SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB
MB: ASUS Sabertooth Z87
OS: Windows 7 64bit
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on July 21, 2013
I have used many SSD's over the years and I can easily say I am the most pleased with this one. It is fast, lightweight and extremely reliable. In order to fully utilize the benefits of this SSD in either Windows or Linux, I would recommend the following:

Windows:

- TRIM is enabled by default, so you don't have to turn it on.
- Disable System Restore. This wastes writes on the device and shortens its lifespan.
- Disable your pagefile. When using an SSD this quick it is not needed and it also wastes writes. Just make sure you have at least 4GB of RAM in your system if you do this.
- Turn off timestamps on NTFS. This is unnecessary and can reduce the life of your SSD.

Linux:

- Turn on TRIM. You can do this by adding discards to your /etc/fstab. You may also want to add noatime as well.
- Add a persistent RAM Disk assuming you have adequate amounts of RAM.
- Use a low latency I/O scheduler (e.g. deadline).

With these options enabled, you will get the most out of your SSD and wonder why you waited so long to get rid of you old spinning hard drive.

Note: If you want to make an exact copy of your existing hard drive to your new SSD:

- Grab and external USB drive carrier that will accept your old hard drive.
- Download a Gparted Live boot disk.
- Take your old hard drive and place it into the external USB drive carrier.
- Install your new SanDisk SSD.
- Boot your system into the Gparted Live Boot Disk.
- Run Gparted and note the drive ID for both your new drive and old.
- Open a terminal and run: dd if=/dev/sdX of=/dev/sdZ (where sdX is your OLD drive and sdZ is your new hard drive. The actual ID's will most likely be /dev/sda and /dev/sdb).
- Wait until the copy operation is complete and shut down the system and remove the external USB drive carrier with your old drive in it.
- Ensure your new drive is still in your system and boot.
- Enjoy your new drive with all of your original data on it!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
I edit HD video, Terabytes of it. Upwards of 1000 clips per project. I've been relying on a great but slower raid box which i have some green drives in. It's reliable as heck, but i've been desiring a smaller, faster drive, which i could keep my current projects on as a scratch,

Importance for editing video
-Editing is tons of IOPS/read/write operations. Comparing my old drive vs this one you can instantly see the differences: When opening the project with 1000 files, how fast does it open? in adobe premiere it shows you the countdown of all the files it's re-connecting to when you open. Old drive: over a minute. Sandisk: a few seconds.
-Playback and clicking between different points in time. Old drive: some lag, some hiccups. New drive: instantaneous, almost all the time.

Other SSDs?
-I was dead set on the 960gb M500 for awhile, it's a great bang for the buck, but my friend turned me on to the deal this one had for $369, and noted in reviews, the M500 was a chunk slower in certain operations than this sandisk.
-The samsung evo pro is probably the equal competitor, similar performance, similar price, but this drive on sale edged it out for me.

What's to like
-Got it for under 78 cents per gb. not as great as the 50 cent per gigabyte deals, but this is much better than average SSD
-Capacity is good if you're editing compressed footage, can fit a feature film plus a lot more from C100 24mbit files. If you're editing RAW files, probably should RAID multiple of these
-Silent
-High IOPS. This is just as important as read/write, espectially for video editing, which is tons of referencing.
-High read/write

What could be better
-Well, cheaper, but i'm actually not complaining, i paid for a high quality dive and i got it.

Workflow
My raid is now the archive/backup, new projects get a folder on there, and a folder on the sandisk. During the edit i'll save frequent copies to the backup drive, but everything is done on the sandisk. Once the edit is done, move the final project file over to the backup drive and delete it off the sandisk.

Overall
It's great, especially for my purposes in editing. You cannot overlook the other things that will affect the performance of your computer, but getting this drive will ensure that the hard drive is no longer bottle-necking your system in any way. I've only got a sata-2 controller, so it's limited to 280mb/sec in/out, but i'm actually not in a rush to get a sata 3 controller, because it's already good as it is, i'm not seeing any bottle neck, it's just lovely.
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The manufacturer commented on the review below
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 2014
For the past few months I (and many others) have been dealing with an issue using this SSD in a MacBook Pro. The symptom is that when the computer is put to sleep and then awoken, the SSD will cause a 30 second (approx.) delay before you can do anything. It has been confirmed (by many) there is an incompatibility between the firmware on this SSD and Mac OSX. Other drives, like the Samsung, OWC, Crucial, they all work fine - but this drive by SanDisk does not. To the best of my knowledge SanDisk is not attempting to repair this problem. I have heard of a few folks having the same issue with Windows 7/8 on a PC, but not near as many. Here is a thread on the Apple forums if you want to look it up for yourself. In any case, avoid this drive if you are going to use it in a MacBook Pro (or potentially any model of Mac). [...]
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The manufacturer commented on this review (What's this?)
Hi BRYAN PARKE,

My name is Allen from SanDisk support. I would like to inform you that we have received a small number of similar reports are currently investigating this issue. However we do not know if or when we will have a fix. I would suggest you try turning off sleeping the HDD in system preferences as this may be related to sleeping the drive. Our engineering team is currently investigating the issue.
For further information, please contact SanDisk support at 1-866-SANDISK or submit a support request at www.sandisk.com/ask .

Thank you,
SanDisk Support.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 24, 2013
This was a great purchase. I'd been mulling over the pros and cons of different manufacturers for some time now and was agonizing over Samsung v. Crucial v. SanDisk v. .... Well, you can get stuck in that pattern forever. I went with the SanDisk partly because of positive past experience with the product (I have other SanDisk SSDs in laptops that have been working well FOREVER) and partly because the read/write numbers were pretty solid for the price.

I was not disappointed in the least. Integrated into a new Z87 MSI motherboard with no trouble, operating system (Win 7 64-bit) installed without a hitch, and man does it scream. Reduced manipulation of a massive Federal Government spreadsheet by about 500%!! By that, I mean that a file that used to take 5 1/2 minutes just to OPEN took only about 30 seconds to open with this baby! What a screamer. Other tasks were difficult to measure, but the speed in every facet of my business computing is noticeable, if not always measurable. Very happy with the product. Big UPS!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 8, 2013
I'm no stranger to flash memory-- like everyone else I own an iPhone and an iPad as well as an Air and a work machine that contains a hybrid drive, but I figured (for reasons I can't really fathom now) that on my main desktop-- a machine tuned primarily for performance computing, no less, that I could hold out for reasons of price and convenience and just ignore SSDs until my next build years from now. However, after my main HDD began to exhibit symptoms of imminent failure I decided that enough was enough and it was time to upgrade to an SSD.

I read the reviews and purchased this one because it was the latest and greatest and most reviews from publications were positive, despite lukewarm interest from individual comments at enthusiast sites.

I can't comment on it's speed vs. other brands and models of SSDs I don't own, so I suggest you do what I did and do your research. From a practical point of view, this thing screams compared to my old 7800RPM HDD. Everything from boot up to the launching of apps is a hundred-fold faster and I'm absolutely happy with my purchase.

One thing to note is that this does not come with mounting screws or any cabling, so even if you have the correct SSD mount for your PC, you'll need 4 tiny little screws of a size not noted in the instructions or on the packaging in order to securely mount it to a fixture, although I imagine that tape may work in a pinch even though I don't really recommend it. You'll also need a SATA 3 cable and in some cases you may have to buy a molex to SATA power dongle if you don't have a free SATA power connector on your mains.

I can't comment on the reliability of this SSD (I don't suppose anyone can, at this point) but all the reviews I read point to a stable, reliable component that will almost surely outlast this PC and potentially my entire lifetime assuming I continue to use my PC the way I do. Barring mechanical defects, this bit is definitely going to last a lot longer than any of my HDDs have, and that, my friends, makes it all the more worth it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I bought the Extreme II 120GB SSD for use with my Ninja2 digital recorder (that happens to be paired with a Nikon D800). So the application is DSLR video. The Extreme II comes with nothing but the drive and a thin spacer. Thus, you need an enclosure to use this unit. No worries, because the Ninja2 comes with a caddy. In 2 minutes, I had the Extreme II in the Caddy and was testing it out for recording video. It works flawlessly. Stored all the footage I wanted it to. Then played back into my MacBook Pro with no problems. I've used on many jobs with excellent results. The speeds seem to be compatible with my computer and applications, including Final Cut Pro X. I did not do any "bench" tests, and don't really care to. It works very well. More than that, is beyond the effort to find out. So for DSLR video, I can recommend this drive. Will be buying a few more to have on hand during long video shoots.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 26, 2013
This Sandisk SSD really does the job for anyone who is looking to upgrade their laptop.
In my case, I had ordered a Lenovo Thinkpad T430 and it came with a HGST 500Gb internal hard drive.
I knew this wouldn't satisfy me and the SSD sold by Lenovo was much more expensive!
As soon as I got my laptop, I took out the internal drive and replaced it with this SSD.

Just to let you know, it is blazing fast!
There have been no problems with it so far and I'm really happy with the product.

There was an instance where the Windows logo was skipped halfway because it was too slow for this drive! Now THAT is something.

NOTE* - This is a 7mm drive! Make sure you check what kind of drive is in your laptop before you buy this product. I believe some laptops use a 9mm internal hard drive and in that case, you're going to need a spacer.

Overall: An excellent SSD for the price!
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The manufacturer commented on the review below
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on March 18, 2014
I bought this to upgrade a 2009 MBP 5,4. It should have worked fine with the SATA controller in my machine. However, the NVIDIA MCP79 SATA chipset has problems negotiating speed with many SATA II & III drives. After installing this drive the MBP was extremely slow, 5 minute boot time, 20-40 seconds to respond to mouse clicks, and minutes to open even the simplest application. There are no firmware updates for either the NVIDIA MCP79 or Sandisk Extreme II that will allow this drive to work properly. Other solutions, such as downgrading the MBP firmware to 1.6, changing the SATA cable, and doing a PRAM reset, do not work.

Sandisk has released a firmware update for the Sandisk Extreme that corrects the problems caused by the NVIDIA MCP Chipset. However, they have not done this for the Extreme II, nor do they state this incompatibility somewhere you would see it before you new exactly what problems to google. Therefore, for making a workaround for the Extreme but not the Extreme II and for not clearly listing a known incompatibility with a common laptop model I give this Sandisk drive 1 star even though it is rightfully the fault of Apple for choosing a sub par SATA controller for their 2009 models.
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The manufacturer commented on this review (What's this?)
Hi FatherOTwo,

My name is Rocky from SanDisk support. The issue that you are facing has been identified wherein the SSD drive has a negotiated speed when used in a Mac Book Pro with NVIDIA MCP79 SATA Chipset. This issue is specific to the Mac Book Pro with NVIDIA MCP79 SATA Chipset and I would advise you to contact SanDisk support at 1-866-SANDISK or submit a support request at www.sandisk.com/support for a resolution.

Thank you,
SanDisk Support.

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