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4.7 out of 5 stars
SanDisk Extreme PRO 32GB UHS-I/U3 SDHC Flash Memory Card with up to 95MB/s- SDSDXPA-032G-AFFP
Size: 32 GBPackage Type: Frustration-Free PackagingChange
Price:$32.95 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
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401 of 416 people found the following review helpful
on November 11, 2012
I have reached advertised speeds on a built-in card reader and a newer digital camera but there are a few things anyone should know when choosing a card.
Cards with 32GB or less are SDHC and should work with most devices released in the last few years. SDXC will cover cards with higher capacities, such as this card in 64GB. This is an important consideration to Linux users since SDXC uses exFAT which may not work with your OS. If you have an up-to-date Windows installation or a recent Mac release you will be fine without third party software, though a firmware update may be necessary for your card reader if it's pre-'09.
You will not achieve UHF speeds on a USB 2.0 bus - you will see a maximum 20-30MB/S depending on file size and other factors. On many host devices the speed gains are negligible during operation because of fast internal memory buffers - I can burst (9/s) an average of 15 shots in RAW+jpeg on my DSLR with a class 6 card, or 18 with this - so probably not worth the premium price for that gain alone. Video there is no difference since the class 6 can float the 20mbps required for 1080i on my camera. In other words, if you can get the extreme pro in 64GB for the same price as the extreme in 128GB, your money is probably better spent on the extreme, if not on a non-UHF card, which is to say class 6 or 10.
It may be noteworthy that this card is waterproof and x-ray proof, but does not specify that it is magnet proof as other brands' documentation does. That said, Sandisk has some of the most robust built-in error checking features in the 'biz and other brands don't really compete in quality if you do some research.
My advice is to make sure you can use the extra speed you're paying for - if you don't have a USB 3.0 card reader, a host device with USB 3.0 PC connection, or a built-in card reader on a laptop that's either newer or has a recent firmware update, you may be wasting a fair sum of money here. Also make sure your device says SDXC if you do go above 32GB. Many devices' documentation will explicitly say that it works up to 32GB. It'll just try to format the card over and over if you feed it an SDXC.
Hopefully some info here was helpful! Happy hunting
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226 of 233 people found the following review helpful
on September 9, 2013
My Nikon D7000 has two card slots. I had a Kingston SDHC 16GB in the second slot and the Extreme Pro 32 GB by Sandisk in the first slot. Unfortunately, I only owned ONE Extreme Pro because I could not justify spending that much on a card but I had a whole pocketful of those Kingston 16gb ones because they're only $11.00! In my mind I thought; "16 gb plus 16 gb is 32gb. Sandisk 32gb card is over $60bucks but two of these Kingston disks will total be one third that price." It's great reasoning for a person who wants to miss 1/3 of the important shots.

I have learned the error of my thinking. If you are a hobbyist photographer, shooting landscapes or family/friends you may not see a need for this disk depending on what you shoot. If you are a professional wedding photographer or a sports photographer; or any kind of photographer where you NEED to capture that one special shot then you NEED this card.

Here's my story: I had run out of space on my Sandisk 32GB while photographing the bride getting to the church. I put in a standard Kingston 16gb SDHC card to shoot the ceremony with. BIG MISTAKE!! I was preparing for the bridesmaids to march down the aisle so I had my camera set to take a quick succession of pictures (in case one had her eyes closed). My camera took so long to cycle that I missed completely the next bridesmaid. It turns out that the Kingston writes at around 4mb/s compared to the Sandisk at 95mb/s. That is a huge difference. Needless to say that I captured the bride getting fed cake, but missed her smearing it on his face. If you don't think that speed matters, wait until you have to tell the bride that you missed an important shot because the disk in your camera can't keep up with your camera. :(

I actually came to this site today to purchase another one; and while I was here decided to put in my thoughts on this disk. Don't be "that photographer" who is known for missing important shots like I did.
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133 of 141 people found the following review helpful
on March 26, 2012
I also own several SanDisk Extreme Memory Cards and the Extreme Pro wins 'hands down'! It is WAY faster than the Extreme card. I used this card in my D7000 and I don't have to stop taking pictures to wait for my memory card to catch up :)
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on October 12, 2012
I purchased this SanDisk Extreme Pro 16 GB SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 95MB/s SDSDXPA-016G-X46 for use with m y new Nikon D600 which supports UHS-1. The card is fast and allows me to shoot at high speed without worrying about the buffer slowing me down. I measured it using CrystalDiskMark 3.0.1 and measured 90.21 MB/s read and 81.06 MB/s write in sequential mode. I uploaded the screen capture of the test to the product photos.
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96 of 113 people found the following review helpful
TOP 50 REVIEWERon February 1, 2012
I have the Delkin Elite and this card, both UHS-I cards at 95MB/s. I also have the SanDisk Extreme Pro 45MB/s card

I'm using them on the Panasonic GH2 and Fujifilm X100.

On the GH2, the 95MB/s and 45MB/s cards are writing at almost the same speed. So it's probably a better choice to get the SanDisk 45MB/s card unless you can find the higher-spec cards at similar or better prices.

On the X100, both 95MB/s cards are faster than the 45MB/s card by small margin. The SanDisk 95MB/s card is slightly faster than the Delkin 95MB/s card by a tiny margin. So the fastest card for X100 is between the two 95MB/s. Which one to choose would be down to the price.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on December 11, 2013
I recently bought another SanDisk card that seemed off, black housing and only "MADE IN CHINA" stamped on the back, no SanDisk logo or serial number. I ran a speed test and on the card that was rated for up to 35MB/s it maxed out at 10MB/s read and write so I contacted Amazon and they made it right. That made me curious about this card that I had already had for over a year. So I tested it and being rated for 95MB/s I get 17.2 MB/s write and 19.2MB/s read.

Edit: SanDisk again confirms that my Extreme Pro card is genuine & tell me the slow read/write speeds are due to my card reader. I still advise you to avoid frustration free packaging as the SanDisk Ultra card I received was a counterfeit. Again, thanks to Amazon for allowing me to return it outside the standard time frame.
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful
If you recently picked up an A77 DSLT, these are the cards to get. Can do great fast dump of the camera buffer. Definitely faster than the 45MB/second UHS-I cards.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on October 1, 2013
While this card is advertised as 95 MBps, in real life, I find the performance is limited to ~ 65 MBps. Still, it's significantly faster than the Extreme (advertised at 45 MBps), which I found to be ~ 42 MBps in actual use. Being 50% faster though means shooting 50% faster when the buffer runs out and clearing the buffer in 33% less time.

About my testing: Using a Nikon D7100 (UHS-I capable) with a single Extreme Pro card, I set it to 12-bit lossy RAW files (with an average file size of 20.8MB) and held the shutter down for 20 seconds. During this time, the camera took 67 shots, which (when adjusting for a buffer size of 7, as indicated) means a transfer speed of 62.4 MBps. I did a similar test with 14-bit lossless files, and found I was able to capture 29 26.8MB shots in 10 seconds, which (adjusting for a buffer size of 5) indicates a transfer speed of 64.3 MBps.

(FYI for fellow D7100 users: adding a second card slows things down as the camera cannot write to the two slots simultaneously, but rather writes one. In order words, setting it to backup mode with two Extreme Pro cards leads to 38 20.8MB shots in 20 seconds (12-bit lossy), or an effective write speed of 32 MBps.)
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207 of 262 people found the following review helpful
on February 24, 2012
UPDATE: May 31, 2013 - I have recently moved from Windows 7 (what I was running when I wrote the original review and the previous update) to Windows 8 and have noticed that Nikon file uploads from this card are now substantially faster. I have not done in-depth testing but my Windows 8 uploads of my Nikon files now transfer at approximately 60MB/s sustained. MUCH better than the sustained 20ishMB/s for my D800E uploads under Windows 7 and still substantially faster than my D5100/D7000 uploads under Win7.

And lol, I don't want to get into any debates about how crappy Win8 is. Yes, out of the box it is downright unusable. But, for just $5 you can instantly purchase and download Stardock's Start8 product that will return the Start Button and Start MENU (as opposed to Win8's Start SCREEN) and you can disable most of the really bothersome corner actions and swipe actions from Start8. Then, Win8 is actually pretty tight! It's fast and has WAY better sleep/resume functionality than Win7. My Win8 computers wake up faster than my Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet! However, with Win8, scrollbar contrast is absolutely horrible in browsers and there is no setting or even RegEdit to remedy this. Stardock's WindowBlinds (essentially custom skins for the User Interface) for $10 MAY remedy this and I will be looking into this shortly... So, use the failure of out-of-the-box Win8 as an awesome opportunity to get really good touchscreen laptop or even desktop hardware at really discounted pricing then spend $5 for Start8 and you're all set! ;)

UPDATE (This update was written prior to my May 31, 2013 Update above): As I now have a Nikon D800E I thought I'd share my results for that particular camera (and presumably the D800 as well) as this card will be a likely choice for D800/E users. As mentioned in my original review below, there appears to be an issue with Nikon files and transfer speed being relatively slow with this card. This problem is worse with the D800E. I shoot either Uncompressed RAW + Large Basic JPEG or Lossless Compressed RAW + Large Basic JPEG and approximately 75% of the time my D800E files transfer at 18-22MB/second. This is no faster than transfers from a Transcend Class 6 card. The other 25% or so of the time I get transfer rates as high as 38MB/second. Better, but pretty poor performance from a claimed 95MB/second card. I have yet to sustain a 45MB/second transfer with my D800E files.

In all fairness, I have not shot with any other cards in my D800E and don't know if slower cards will transfer slower than this card does.

ORIGINAL REVIEW BELOW:

First, let's be clear about transfer speeds. And for the record, all speeds I mention in this review are my ACTUAL MEASURED speeds, not manufacturer-claimed or hypothetical limits. I'm talking my real world experience. I use a Transcend TS-RDF8K USB 3.0 card reader and I transferred to a benchmarked 514MB/s write, 551MB/s read Mushkin Chronos solid state drive. See 3rd to last paragraph for camera frame advance rate information and the last paragraph for USB 2.0, USB 3.0 and FireWire information.

My main concern with memory card speed is for computer uploads after a day or night of shooting... First, let me get the ATTO Disk Benchmark numbers out of the way. Doing the 1GB Total Length test, from 64K to 8192K samples, the read speed is consistently at 85MB/s for reads and 71MB/s to 77MB/s for writes. I never got even 86MB/s or more (aside from the initial data transfer rate spikes) once during my testing and feel SanDisk is lying about the card's ability to hit 95MB/s. It never even hit 86MB/s a single time. So, that's benchmarking. Now on to the real world.

I have some conflicting results with these cards (I have 3 of the SanDisk 16GB "95MB/s" cards; 1 for each of 3 cameras):

When transferring files from my Canon S100 card, I routinely hold 80-81MB/s uploads to my computer. Not bad at all! Especially being that they are real world numbers. However, they're supposed to be 95MB/s cards. The only time I ever see 95MB+/s is the MOMENT they start transferring data. Same as any other card, there is that initial spike and then the numbers drop fast. So, 80MB/s is a nice fast upload even though I paid for 95MB/s. I feel like I'm getting shorted by 16%. :(

When transferring from my Nikon D5100 card, after the initial spike I only sustain, *gulp*, about 40-45MB/s uploads. :( VERY disappointing! That's only 33-50% faster than the 30MB/s cards that cost WAY less and not even double the speed of the Transcend Class 6 or 10 cards (Transcend Class 6 is the same speed as their Class 10) that cost 1/4 what these cards do. I'd like to blame SanDisk for this but in all honesty, I think it is something with the Nikon files. I don't see how this is possible but when I put my Nikon files on the Canon S100's card, I get the same 40-45MB/s transfer speeds. Therefore, it's not an individual card's idiosyncrasy. It's probably something with those Nikon files. Makes no sense to me, but I can't figure any other reason. It's not the card, because they all benchmark within 1% of each other and handle Canon S100 files like the other cards and Nikon files like the other cards. If anyone can help me out with this Nikon slow speed issue, please comment here. Thanks. :)

Uploading Nikon files TO the card (write speed) from my computer, I get about 60MB/s. Strange that this is faster than the read speed...

REGARDING CAMERA FRAME ADVANCE RATE... I've reviewed the SanDisk 30MB/s (real life 30MB/s computer uploads with USB 3.0) card and Transcend Class 10 cards (real life 25MB/s computer uploads with USB 3.0) in the past and I found there to be literally only approximately a 0.1% SanDisk 30MB/s card frame advance rate advantage in both my Nikon D90 and D7000. Such a minuscule "advantage" could easily be attributable to my stopwatch button-pressing. I informally tested the "95MB/s" card in my D7000 in Continuous High advance shooting "Lossless Compressed" RAW files only, not RAW+JPEG. I got 9 frames (buffer capacity) at rated FPS of 6FPS and then jerky buffer-restricted advance at 1.5 frames per second. My Class 6 and 10 cards give me the same 9 frames in 1.5 seconds and then continue after the buffer is exhausted at 0.7FPS. In other words, the "95MB/s" card gets you an extra 0.8FPS after the buffer is exhausted. So, card speed means pretty much nothing when shooting RAW files. I don't know about Class 2 or 4 cards potentially slowing things down, but who cares about such slow cards that nobody has anyway? ;) However, though card speed does nothing for RAW FPS, what it may do is raise the JPEG quality and/or size that a camera can shoot in while maintaining maximum FPS (i.e. hypothetically 6FPS forever in Normal Medium JPEG with the "95MB/s" card vs. Normal Small JPEG with a typical Class 10 card). RAW frame advance rate is ALL about the camera's buffer and data output rate, NOT the memory card. PERIOD. It is a myth that card speed matters for RAW frame advance rate.

So, is it worth it? To me, yes. Even at only 40MB/s, these cards save me a lot of time when uploading several to many GB per transfer. At 80MB/s, fuhgeddaboudit, absolutely! If you get paid for photography, time is money and these cards save a lot of time and frustration waiting therefore are worth the money. If you shoot video, you'll save LOTS of time so these cards are totally worth it. So if I love the cards so much, why only 4 stars? Because if you only transfer 250MB per day, these cards will do nothing for you. They won't help your camera in any way and will only save you literally 6.9 seconds per day (250MB takes 10 seconds with a Transcend Class 6 or 10 card or takes 3.1 seconds with a true 80MB/s card like this SanDisk "95MB/s" card). I'm also upset that I usually only get 40-45MB/s uploads and many people are buying this card thinking it will give their DSLRs crazy fast frame advance rates and that is straight-up mythology since it won't even help at all and for them it will be totally wasted money.

A NOTE ON COMPUTER TRANSFER SPEED... If your computer is NOT FireWire and/or USB 3.0 equipped and/or you are using a USB 2.0 card reader on a USB 3.0/FireWire computer, you're NOT going to get better than a hair over 20MB/s transfer speeds regardless of card speed. Just a limitation of USB 2.0, not the card.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on December 27, 2011
Field tested this card at the zoo recently with the A77. With the 95mb/s Extreme Pro card, the limited buffer of the A77 becomes less of a nuisance. In the past with the Sony MS Duo Pro HG card, I may miss a few shots while the camera is writing but the high speed SD card means the buffer clears in a few seconds and the camera is ready for the next shot. I tend to fire a few quick shots in 8 fps mode or take multiple single shots with the wireless remote and I never missed a shot with this card. Strongly recommended for A77 owners.
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