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Sanctifying Misandry: Goddess Ideology and the Fall of Man Hardcover – January, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 407 pages
  • Publisher: Mcgill Queens Univ Pr (January 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0773536159
  • ISBN-13: 978-0773536159
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.2 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,292,445 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Katherine K. Young is James McGill Professor of religious studies at McGill University. Paul Nathanson is a researcher in religious studies at McGill University. They are co-authors of Spreading Misandry: The Teaching of Contempt for Men in Popular Cultur

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27 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Hu(man) on April 11, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The authors argue that ideological feminism and misandry, disguised as "engaged scholarship" and carried out by "political activists masquerading as scholars," are the driving forces of an influential group of writers who have attempted to show the existence of a goddess-based religion that preceded Western monotheism and who are attempting to revive it. The book is "about the attitude toward religion of goddess ideologues." Young and Nathanson expose the essentially political agenda of the principal authors who make such claims, citing the faulty scholarship of several "case studies," including Gerda Lerner, Marija Gimbutas, Mary Daly, Cynthia Eller and Marilyn French. The authors also discuss the misinformation conveyed in several well-known, influential documentaries on goddess religion (Goddess, Veil and The Burning Times). Worship of Goddess (sophiantry), which is meant to replace the worship of God in monotheism, is revealed as a form of self-worship of the individual writers whose work is analyzed. Ideological feminists are identified as belonging to postmodernism (itself deemed a "civil religion"), which denies the possibility of historical objectivity and justifies the fanciful rewriting of history, for example, by goddess "thealogians." (The neologism "thealogian" is common among the writers discussed.) The "basic premise of feminist ideology, including goddess ideology," write Young and Nathanson, is" that human history is nothing less than a conspiracy of men against women." Its goal is a new world order--a gynotopia--in which females dominate males, thus reversing the presumed imposition of domination of women by men that is said to have followed a primordial period of goddess religion.Read more ›
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Byron on January 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I've just finished this latest installment in Paul Nathanson and Katherine K. Young's 'Misandry' Trilogy [this is a stop-gap diversion before 'Transcending Misandry', the big finale, is finished]. I've docked it one star because it can't quite live up to the standards of their previous work, & I don't think it makes its case quite as impeccably as those two astounding books. But then, religion is a much wider, & infinitely more subjective field than an analysis of man-hate in the media or the law, & those two previous books are two of the most important books ever written.

Having said all of that, this is still essential reading I would recommend to anyone, as there is nothing else like this out there tackling this most vitally important issue.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Five Points Higher on August 21, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a worthy additon to the authors' 'Misandry' series of books. It debunks one of the more recent manifestations of feminist-revisionist history, that is, that there was once some sort of utopia under a 'great goddess' who was worshipped until men, with their supposed inherently warlike ways, up and ruined everything. The book also convincingly refutes the notion that women are inherently more 'in touch' with nature than are men; it turns out that the idea of a 'mother earth' is a false notion that can be traced to a misinterpretation/distortion of a casual remark made by an American Indian chief about how he wanted to sit down!

Sanctifying Misandry is a somewhat less dense read than was Legalizing Misandry, but it's a little more dense than Nathanson and Young's first book, Spreading Misandry. I am looking forward with enthusiasm to the planned final book in the series, 'Transcending Misandry'.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ansis on June 7, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This tome offers a balance to power structures and languages with which to discuss the intertwined messages from society and the media.
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