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Sandman Vol. 10: The Wake (New Edition) (Sandman (Graphic Novels)) Paperback – November 13, 2012

4.8 out of 5 stars 85 customer reviews
Book 10 of 12 in the Sandman Series

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

This is the conclusion to the much talked about Sandman series. It may be best to start your Sandman acquaintance with earlier episodes, but The Wake stands as one of Neil Gaiman's strongest and most consistent Sandman volumes to date. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Praise for Sandman:

"The greatest epic in the history of comic books"—The Los Angeles Times Magazine 
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Product Details

  • Series: Sandman (Graphic Novels) (Book 10)
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo; New edition (November 13, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401237541
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401237547
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.3 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #24,654 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on August 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
The first three chapters in this graphic novel are the story of the funeral for the King of Dreams, mostly seen through the beady, little smart-assed eyes of the raven who was once Matthew Cable. Delirium manages to steal the show a bit in the first act, but there's plenty for everyone. Just about everyone puts in an appearance here, from the lovely, self-absorbed and funny Rose Walker, who adjusts to her `condtion' with the help of her estranged brother Jed; to the immortal Indian King talked about in World's End (who makes a Winnie the Pooh reference, so's you know it's good).
The convention of Morpheus' old lovers is nice. Good Queen Titania refuses to disclose any specifics about their rumored relationship, Larissa/Thessaly comes to tears speaking about Morpheus (wasn't she directly responsible for him getting killed in the first place, though?), and Calliope's speech about her gratefulness to Dream for the mercy-killing of their son, was strangely beautiful. Meager words, however, cannot possibly describe the eulogies of Morpheus' family and friends, nor the mystical funeral barge that Dream's final voyage is taken on. It IS the stuff dreams are made of.
But, celebrity guest stars aside, this is the story of the late Dream King's best friend and right-hand bird, Matthew, coming to grips with his boss' death, the option of ending his own life, and the new Dream on the throne. Dream/Daniel Hall has a busy time too. Fear over meeting the rest of his family, The Endless, over dinner, and his quiet moments with the palace guards, show that, despite however much of Morpheus there may be in him, this time, Dream is more human than ever. But, as Destruction's visit proves, Morpheus is still very much a part of Daniel.
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Format: Paperback
Throughout the course of his acclaimed comic book saga, Sandman, Neil Gaiman always worked at his own pace. Thus, it is no surprise that the falling action that follows The Kindly Ones, the grand finale of the series, should last six issues and be a story arc onto itself. No matter, though. Gaiman possesses an immaculate sense of precision and rarely did any part of his saga stretch on longer than it had to. With The Wake, Sandman's long epilogue, Gaiman continues to dazzle readers with his beautifully surreal people and places and his inspiring deliberations on life, death, family and the significance of storytelling.
Sandman features a family of Greek God-like entities called The Endless, each of which have some sort of responsibility in regulating the conscious experience of mortals. In The Wake, the remaining members of the clan, Destiny, Death, Desire, Despair and Delirium hold a wake and funeral for Dream (Sandman's protagonist more often than not), who died in The Kindly Ones. Almost every character that played a part in the series attends. Meanwhile, Daniel, the child who inherited the mantle of the Dream King, prepares to meet his new family. There is a certain grace, warmth and thoroughness with which Gaiman addresses death, mourning and the welcoming of a new family member that makes this tale sure to cause readers to reflect on his or her own experiences with the aforesaid. Michael Zulli is the most grand and majestic illustrator to ever grace the pages of Sandman and his style certainly works for the story. Truly, the memorial services for Dream make-up one of the best pieces of the Sandman saga.
That story only lasts for first three issues, though. The remaining three of this volume are single-issue stories.
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By A Customer on September 4, 1997
Format: Paperback
A fitting title to one of the best comic series ever printed. The reader who has followed the Sandman series finally wakes up from the incredible 5 year 'dream' saga. It is not as heavy to read as some of the other earlier collections since it is made up of short stories. This collection wraps up the loose bits and pieces to the Sandman series. The first part sees the wake for Morpheus and Daniel taking up the mantle as the new Dream. The rest are individual stories. We see Hob's reaction to the departure of his friend, a story of a traveller trapped in The Dreaming and finally concludes, appropriately, with Neil Gaiman's take on Shakespere's "The Tempest".
To really understand and appreciate this book, the reader would be have to have read at least "The Kindly Ones". As for me, I really liked this book and would have given it a 10 if I didn't have to wake up from this fantastic dream Gaiman has taken me, and countless others to.
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Format: Paperback
When I heard the rumor that Dream would die, I fought against it utterly...until I picked up and read (and nearly lost to several friends after lending it out) The Wake. I knew that Dream was truly dead...though not really...just a new incarnation. But what I didn't understand before reading is how Gaiman could possibly make me love our beloved and brooding Sandman more. But he did. The new Dream is not un-Dreamlike. He is thoughtful and somewhat brooding, like his pretocesor...but unlike the old Dream, he is more capable of compassion and feeling. He is as beautiful as the old Dream, but more a Dream for a new millennium. I do wish that the story didn't have to end so soon...but at least I have my dreams. And in them the story does go on. Thank you, Neil. I'll join you and Tori in hanging out with your Dream King any time.
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