Sarah Vaughan

February 29, 2000 | Format: MP3

$4.99
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 29, 2000
  • Release Date: February 29, 2000
  • Label: Verve Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2000 PolyGram Records Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 49:57
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000V6MSJO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,048 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 43 customer reviews
And the sound recording of the CD is so great that it brings out the beauty of Sassy's voice.
Alex
She's wonderful on "Lullaby of Birdland," scatting as well as Ella, and she excels on "September Song," almost defining the vocal ballad.
M. Allen Greenbaum
This is one of the all-time greats from one of the all-time greats, and ought to be in the top 10.
Rick Cornell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

94 of 94 people found the following review helpful By John Jones on March 23, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Sarah Vaughan's self-titled album featuring Clifford Brown has always been a landmark of her recording career; her warm, lush voice was in absolute top form and the musical backing was nothing short of stellar. And whereas most jazz vocalists of the 50's focused mainly on their own singing, this album explains why musicians considered Sarah one of their own; this isn't so much a singer's release as it is a project by a jazz combo that happens to feature a human voice as one of its counterparts. Generous solos are given throughout, and the album has an earthy, jam-session quality. "You're Not the Kind" and "Lullaby of Birdland" show Sarah at the height of her swinging abilities ("Birdland" even boasts what is arguably the best scat of her career) and "I'm Glad There is You," "April in Paris," and "Embraceable You" rank among the most moving and emotional ballads she's ever recorded.
Additionally, this release single-handedly justifies the remastering and reissuing process. This album has been available on CD for years and sounded just fine; the reissue, however, adds a texture to the music (especially noticeable on sax and drums) that is priceless. Amazingly, Sarah's voice sounds even more beautiful and the project as a whole no longer sounds like it was recorded decades ago. For artistic jazz standards of yesteryear and the sound technology of today, you can't find a better release than "Sarah Vaughan."
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40 of 40 people found the following review helpful By M. Allen Greenbaum HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on November 27, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Subtle Sarah
There's no one like the young Sarah Vaughan; on this album she has a beautifully smooth and supple voice (in addition to her famous "head tones"). She's not quite as operatic or showy (the long tremolos, for example) here as on some of her work. Despite the relative understatement, however, her tonal changes and swoops are dramatic.
She's wonderful on "Lullaby of Birdland," scatting as well as Ella, and she excels on "September Song," almost defining the vocal ballad. The great Clifford Brown has a sweet extended trumpet solo, rapid and soft at the same time. While I'm not a fan of jazz flute, Herbie Mann adds dimension to the album (and is used sparingly), and he stays away from pyrotechnics. "He's My Guy" has almost an R and B sound, with an excellent sax solo, and memorable work by Brown and Jones. But, ouch... there's a high-pitched flute solo that I could have done without. "Guy" is one of the faster songs on this album of ballads.
There's an excellent selection of standards here, from "I'm Glad There is You," to "April in Paris" and "Embraceable You," with subtle comping by Paul Quinichette (ts), Jimmy Jones (p), and Joe Benjamin (b). "I'm Glad There is You" is tender and romantic, and Sarah provides some tremendous vocals, shifting tones in mid-stream and adding tremolos to good effect. Her sentimental "April in Paris" is perhaps the best version I've heard- she elevates its emotional power without saccharine effects. "Embraceable You" is not quite as appealing; Brownie's trumpet would have increased the impact. While I can never get enough of Clifford Brown, there's enough here to satisfy, especially his full-ground, powerful, cuttingly smooth work on "Jim," "He's My Guy," and the aforementioned "September Song.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By David G. Lucas on September 10, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is another album ranking in my top-ten personal favorites, and damned if it doesn't feature Clifford Brown too, just like Helen Merrill's classic...he draws your heartstrings and accents these recordings naturally, perfectly. Beautiful songs, beautiful lady, nobody has more gorgeous phrasing or heart-lifting vocals than Sarah. Can you live without this album in regular rotation? I can't.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Ronald S. Cohen on December 20, 1999
Format: Audio CD
One of the great recordings of all time. Sarah's voice is perfectly recorded, and she was absolutely hitting her stride. The players include three of the all-time greats: Herbie Mann, Paul Quinichette, and the great Clifford Brown.
Song highlights include the beautiful "I'm Glad There Is You," the serene "April in Paris," and "Jim". "Jim" is particularly notable for Brownie's priceless solo -- one of the best recordings of Brownie at his peak shortly before his tragic death. The segue from Sarah to Brownie is a model of everything vocal jazz is supposed to be. If you don't get the chills, check your pulse.
Some say Sarah was more of an operatic than a jazz singer. This album, with classic tunes played by a who's-who of 1950's jazz, proves them wrong.
If you're going to buy only one Sarah Vaughan album, this should probably be it, followed closely by "Crazy and Mixed Up."
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By N. Dorward on November 27, 2002
Format: Audio CD
At this stage of her career Vaughan was often put in front of larger bands; here, however, she's working just with Jimmy Jones's trio plus three horns: tenor saxophonist Paul Quinichette, flautist Herbie Mann & the great trumpeter Clifford Brown. The arrangements are by Ernie Wilkins, though the tracks aren't in fact highly "arranged" in feel.
Sarah Vaughan's voice was of course at its freshest & loveliest at this point, & it's truly mesmerizing no matter what the material. Or perhaps I should say "despite the material": there's an odd mix of classic songs like "September Song", "April in Paris" & "Embraceable You" with material that hardly was up to that calibre. "Lullaby of Birdland" is a great tune, but it's an instrumental: the lyrics superadded to Shearing's melody are truly atrocious, & Vaughan's near-operatic voice can't do much with rhymes like "birdland" and "word-land", or phrases like "magic music we make with our lips when we kiss". "Jim"'s lyrics mine the same kind of helpless pathos one associates with some of Billie Holiday's setpieces, & Vaughan's reading has some noticeable Holiday inflections, but it's not exactly a great tune, with a wretchedly clumsy B section lyric (rhyming "call it quits" with "breaking my heart in bits"....ouch!). -- All that said, Vaughan's superb on the material which actually can sustain some interpretive weight. "April in Paris" & "Embraceable You" are both done at dead-slow tempos & are very lovely; "Lullaby of Birdland", despite the rotten lyrics, also has an excellent bit of scatting on it.
The band is rather mixed.
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