Sarah's Key 2011 PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

(266) IMDb 7.5/10
Available in HD
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An American journalist (Scott Thomas) discovers a mysterious family story related to the French Vel'd'Hiv Roundup in 1942. Sixty years later, the truth remains unknown.

Starring:
Kristin Scott Thomas, Mélusine Mayance
Runtime:
1 hour 42 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Sarah's Key

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Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama
Director Gilles Paquet-Brenner
Starring Kristin Scott Thomas, Mélusine Mayance
Supporting actors Niels Arestrup, Frédéric Pierrot, Michel Duchaussoy, Dominique Frot, Natasha Mashkevich, Gisèle Casadesus, Aidan Quinn, Sarah Ber, Arben Bajraktaraj, Karina Hin, James Gerard, Joseph Rezwin, Kate Moran, Paul Mercier, Alexandre Le Provost, Serpentine Teyssier, Simon Eine, Julie Fournier
Studio The Weinstein Company
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Very well done and thought provoking story.
P. L. DIFULVIO
Very realistic life story of of a young girl; starting with the rounding up of Jews by French Police during the Nazi occupation of Paris.
Will
And my mind was speechless as I just embraced the very strong emotional connection I felt with the story and the film.
BLACKBOXBLUE

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

104 of 116 people found the following review helpful By Robert G. Splaine Jr. on July 31, 2011
Format: DVD
The story of a 1942 Jewish family being evicted from their home in Paris and sent to a camp is interwoven with the plot of a modern-day reporter trying to determine what happened to the little girl in the family. Scenes of the fate of Jewish people at the time are always powerful to watch, with this one being no exception. The anguish of families being separated is realistically portrayed, but their eventual fate is not depicted. The story revolves around the little girl, Sarah, trying to determine the fate of her brother. The other story features the always good Kristin-Scott Thomas, doing a story on the eviction of Jews from Paris, and focusing on understanding the fate that befell Sarah. This is a powerful film that will captivate the viewer.
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80 of 90 people found the following review helpful By BLACKBOXBLUE on August 26, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
FILM RATING: 4 stars

The best movie I've seen in 2011 so far is Sarah's Key (2010). This French-English import is one of those little "sleeper" movies that totally surprises you and blows you away when you see it. Sarah's Key has a very emotional core to it that really looks into the human condition from multiple perspectives. And it searches for the "truth" within. This is a movie much in the vein of Schindler's List (1993), The Pianist (2002), The Reader (2008), and The English Patient (1996). It's not exactly "light" fare. But it's also not quite as dark as Schindler's List or The Pianist. I found the weaving of the two main story lines, one past and one present, to be perfect. It's not always easy for a filmmaker to pull together past and present set stories, with actors playing the same character at various ages, but director Gilles Paquet-Brenner found a way to do it brilliantly. And the same can be said for the way he weaves together both French and English languages into the movie. I never felt like I was "working" to follow the dialogue through reading subtitles. Granted, the movie is only partially subtitled. Parts of it are in English and parts are in French.

The story centers around the events of the French round-up of its own Jewish citizens in July 1942. That's right...the French, not the Germans. Of course I'm sure the French were feeling pressure from the Germans during the time. And yet it's hard to overlook the fact that the French were just as guilty of genocide as the Germans and Russians. One can truly understand why there was a "World" war at this time. Sarah's Key is simply sharing another piece of the puzzle that we've been reluctant to look at until recently because of how ugly the puzzle is.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on November 8, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Part of the dangers inherent in adapting a wildly popular and beloved novel is that if you miss the mark, even in the slightest, you risk antagonizing a core audience that will be brutal in its appraisal. "Sarah's Key" is such a story. This adaptation of Tatiana De Rosnay's memorable bestseller, however, strikes the right balance which should appease both fans of the novel and new viewers alike. This is an impeccably mounted production that straddles contemporary drama with mysteries from the past. As the first half of the picture unfolded, I truly felt as if I were seeing one of the most effective and affecting films of the year. It is that good. Once a pivotal moment is reached in the story, however, the narrative momentum takes a sharp turn and the movie loses some of its dramatic imperative. Don't get me wrong, it's still a solid feature--but the first hour is so good, the second half pales a bit in comparison.

The plot drives you forward with the fascinating and harrowing story of a young girl named Sarah set amidst the round-up of Jews in 1942 France. Sarah's tale is intercut with modern sequences in which Kristin Scott Thomas plays a journalist about to inhabit an apartment once occupied by Sarah's family. Scott Thomas becomes intrigued by the history of the residence as her husband's family acquired the property late in 1942. This leads her to be obsessed in finding out the truth of the those that were forced to give up the apartment. While Scott Thomas is terrific, it is Sarah's tale that really resonates. Sent to the camps, divided from her family, desperate to find her brother--I was captivated, horrified, and excited by her journey. She is a great character leading the viewer on a devastating path.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By W. Easley VINE VOICE on December 14, 2011
Format: DVD Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
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A serious story of the French persecution of their Jewish citizens during WWII, Sarah's Key is an impelling tale of a young girl's struggle with her captivity and the consequences of her actions. Set in Paris in 1942 and 2009, The film switches back and forth between the 1940s and 2000s as the plot develops.

The story is told by an American journalist Julia Jarmond (Kristin Scott Thomas) who in 2009 discovers that her French husband's family bought a dwelling that had been occupied by a Jewish family before the internment. Julia becomes fascinated with the history and resolves to discover the truth concerning the events of 1942.

The Jewish family Wladyslaw and Rywka Starzynski and their children are rounded up by the French police in 1942. The family lost all their possessions, them they were separated and sent to different work camps before being transported to Auschwitz.

Unlike many films about the Holocaust, Sarah's Key does not focus upon the death camps or the killing of thousands of Jews. Instead, this story is about Sarah who locks her little brother in a closet to protect him when the French police come to arrest her father. Unfortunately the police take her and her mother as well and sarah is unable to return home to release her brother from the closet. Sarah becomes focused upon escaping the police so she can rescue her brother.

The film does show some of the initial suffering of those Jews who are arrested by the French. There are several graphic scenes of police brutality and indifference of the general population to the plight of those captured.

Julia Jarmond Kristin Scott Thomas is excellent as Julia Jarmond, and Niels Arestrup is outstanding as the French farmer who aids Sarah.
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