Buy Used
$4.81
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by owlsbooks
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Book is used, fast shipping and great customer service.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sarah's Long Walk: How the Free Blacks of Boston and their Struggle for Equality Changed America Hardcover – December 31, 2004


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.86 $0.48
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Press; 1St Edition edition (December 31, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807050180
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807050187
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,367,536 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Minister and novelist Stephen Kendrick (Night Watch) collaborates with his college student son, Paul, to recount the story of Sarah Roberts, who, in 1848, at five years old, became a symbol of the plight of free blacks "forced to persevere in unjust circumstances." Because Sarah had to walk past five white-only schools to reach her school, Sarah's father, aided by African-American attorney Robert Morris, sued the city in a case whose ultimate decision established the concept of "separate but equal." The Kendricks not only tell Sarah's story but also offer a chronology of Boston's black activism, including portraits of David Walker, a Southern-born thrift store owner whose Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World galvanized blacks as Thomas Paine's Common Sense had roused white patriots, and William Nell, a former errand boy for abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison who became one of the great leaders of the fight for school equality. Most notably, the authors unearth considerable information about Robert Morris, the attorney who represented Sarah Roberts, whose name has been left out or listed incorrectly in many accounts of the court case. The authors handle the weighty issue of desegregation with skill; this is a book for historians and humanitarians.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

One hundred three years before Brown v. Board of Education was argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, a black father in Boston challenged the policy of segregated education that forced his five-year-old daughter to walk past white schools to attend a poorly equipped black school. The Kendricks offer a thoroughly well researched and absorbing look at the social forces that culminated in the first legal challenge to segregated education, including the tense social debate within the Boston black community on the merits of segregation versus integration. Amidst growing social foment for abolition and equal rights, the Kendricks highlight the work of black attorney Robert Morris, activist William Cooper, and other black citizens, whose contributions have been obscured by luminaries such as William Lloyd Garrison and Charles Sumner. Readers interested in how contemporary issues of integration have evolved and the important roles played by ordinary people in making historic changes will enjoy this compelling account of the antebellum struggle for equal rights in the North. Vanessa Bush
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Reader on March 12, 2008
Format: Paperback
Sarah's Long Walk is a very well-researched historical view of a fascinating time in Boston history. As a native of Boston, I quickly became aware of how much I DON'T know about this side of Boston history as I read the book. It was a rare treat to be educated by the history and entertained by the well-recounted stories. I highly recommend the book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alan Mills VINE VOICE on April 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
Sarah's Long Walk is a well-written history of the first civil rights movement--pre-civil war--in Boston. Without the First Amendment, and without any of the Civil Rights laws that we all take for granted, free Blacks in Boston first demanded and built their own school, and then fought to integrate all public schools.

The center of the book is an--at the time--court case, in which America's first Black lawyer co-counseled with the soon to be Senator Charles Sumner (later famous for having been beaten half to death by a southern Senator on the floor of the Senate)to bring a legal challenge to segregated schools.

In what could have served as the model for the civil rights movement of the 40's -- 60's, the legal strategy meshed with a community organizing strategy. Despite arguments which largely were identical to those used by the S.Ct. in Brown over 100 years later, plaintiff lost the Boston case. However, a few years later, they won in the legislature, and Massachusetts became the first state to desegregate its public schools as a matter of law.

This struggle was truly remarkable when it is placed in historical context (as the authors do very well). This was the period when the fugitive slave law was in full swing, and every Black in Boston--free or slave--was at risk of being kidnaped and sent to slavery in the south. Dred Scott held that slaves had no legal rights. Despite this extraordinarily tenuous hold on legal citizenship, Boston's school desegregation struggle was almost exclusively lead by local Blacks. The abolitionists initially ignored, or even opposed, their demands.

A remarkable story, well told.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By AvidReader on October 2, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is such a powerful story of some of America's earliest Civil rights leaders. In a time when slavery was still legal and fugitive slaves were being hunted down, a group of courageous African Americans dared to stand for desegregation of schools. And they won the fight! You'll find yourself cheering as they pray for the impossible and it comes to pass. The authors have done an incredible job of researching little known and hard to find historical facts to present this remarkable story that proves people can make a big difference. This lays the foundation for better understanding the historic Brown v. Board of Education decision that came over a century later, but was heavily influenced by this early court case. We really enjoyed reading this very well documented, entertaining, and well organized book. We look forward to reading more by these authors.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. A. Murphy on August 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
So you want to be proud of Boston?

Yes there are Red Sox and Celtics and ok, John Adams, but you ain't seen nothing yet.

Read this book and tell your friends about it. Sarah herself is somewhat inconsequential...but the scences, the smells, the names, the flavors, the history...these make it an awesome read. Buy it even if you are not from Boston, but just love history and justice. Buy it for your friends.

Buy it now!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tess A. Mangold on March 7, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition
Reminds me of the musical RAGTIME....I cried and laughed...What a truly enlightening experience of the struggles they faced....
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?