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Satan: His Psychotherapy and Cure by the Unfortunate Dr. Kassler, J.S.P.S. Paperback – November 21, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse (November 21, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 059514506X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595145065
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #748,109 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jeremy Leven, a renowned screenwriter, was educated at St. John?s College and Harvard. Satan is his second novel. Screenwriting credits include his first novel Creator, Don Juan DeMarco (which he also directed), and, most recently, The Legend of Bagger Vance. He lives in Woodbridge, Connecticut with his wife, Roberta Danza.

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Customer Reviews

The story is by turns funny and sad and all-too-true.
Bob Grommes
Shortly into the story it is made clear that Satan has a brilliant physicist unknowingly build a machine that allows Satan to communicate with our world.
Big Cadillac
I highly recommend this book to those who want to read something different and inventive.
CJ

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Weaver on January 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
Java is filled with unlimited possibilities.
Consider this: I was at a local coffee place with a friend who was leaving town. He ran into the coffee shop's lending library (take a book and either return it or replace it for the other interested readers around you) and came back out with a book that he said had caught his eye during his many excursions for caffeine.
The book was Jeremy Leven's 1982 "Satan: His Psychotherapy and Cure by the Unfortunate Dr. Kassler, J.S.P.S."
Quite a mouthful of a title.
I nodded politely and began edging toward the door.
But my friend's description of the book ("Some doctor develops a computer program that believes it is Beelzebub, and proceeds to give it therapy") intrigued me. So, after a few weeks of tossing and turning, I decided to return downtown and check out the book.
The story is a little more complicated than that. Dr. Sy Kassler does indeed see a computer that may or may not turn out to be Lucifer, Prince of Darkness. But there are many hilarious twists and turns to this 500-page tome, and many different aspects to the plot.
SATAN: The computer, if that is what it is, is the brainchild of the genius Dr. Leo Szlyck. Szlyck is called to connect and create a mysterious bunch of wires and synapses to result in ol' Mephistopheles. But it is during the course of therapy that the Dark One asks us to ponder, "Think about what it must take to dare to be God's enemy."
THE UNFORTUNATE DR. KASSLER: Sy Kassler is indeed unfortunate. We first meet him coercing an STD-beleaguered, only-Italian speaking girl into his bed. Then there is his subsequent love affair with and marriage to the commitment-shy Vita, who turns psychotic after the birth of their first child. Kassler leads the life of a tragic figure.
Read more ›
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "james_t" on January 6, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Can a mere novel completely change your brain chemistry andirreversibly pickle your theology? This one WILL. You'll also laugh,cry and forever rethink what they've always told you about God and Satan. This book's perfectly constructed irony and pit-dark black humor makes it a worthy companion of 'Catch 22', but its characters aren't typical black-comedy pawns. Levin's players are fallible and funny, warm and loving, distinctively-drawn people for whom you'll care deeply. The females are especially strong, sympathetic and distinctive... The book is a hilarious send-up of psychotherapy doublespeak, a surprisingly profound yet entertaining meditation on philosophy and theology (from Satan's side of things), and a tear-provoking tale of Kassler's family, full of love for each other but hopelessly dysfunctional... If Kassler's 1970s-style recap of Job's bad luck streak doesn't plunge him to such wretched depths that he follows through on his planned suicide (and that's a big 'if'), he'll instead plumb the Devil's unhappiness via the strangest psychotherapy ever transcribed. If Kassler makes Satan happy once again, Kassler's reward will be to learn the answer to The Great Question, ''What is life?'' (Yep, the book tells us this cosmic truth, too -- worth the price of admission alone, as the carny pitchmen used to say) .... OK, enough gush. You've GOT to read this. PLEASE. I PROMISE it will be worth every second it takes you to find it. THIS BOOK WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 26, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was an 8th grader in a Catholic school when I found a copy of this lying on a teacher's desk, no doubt confiscated so as to protect some young, impressionable mind... Well, Satan called to me, apparently, and I was compelled to help myself to the book before the teacher returned to the classroom. I started reading it at lunch, and by the time school let out, I was hooked! Even at my young age, I recognized that this was one of the best stories I'd ever read. A great appreciator of sarcasm and dry wit, I often found myself sympathizing more with Satan than that "Poor Schmuck," Jeffrey. (If I were his wife, I would have left him, too!) I must have read it about 10 times. Unfortunately, my dad decided to save me from myself, and the book perished in the fireplace at his hands. Now, at the semi-seasoned age of 26, I want desperately to read it again. I've tried for years to find another copy, to no avail. If anyone can steer me in the right direction (I realize it's out of print, but would gladly accept a used donation!), I'd be immensely grateful!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 15, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
An intensely dense text that is at turns delightful, humorous and sarcastic while remaining thought-provoking throughout. On a humorous par with Douglas Adams' ("The Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy Trilogy") best, but on the intellectual level of Stephen Hawking, with Vonnegut's ironic tone thrown in for good measure.

The novel is actually constructed in a beautiful homage to Dante's "Inferno," right down to the internal movement of the story, which spirals into each of Dante's levels of Hell, allowing the well-drawn main characters to commit each of the sins that would lead them to that specific level. If you can read this book in conjunction with "The Inferno," you'll appreciate its many levels even more. This may be a tall order, but it is truly worth the investment of time necessary.

I have read this book nearly once a year since I first found it in 1984. It's remained fresh every time.
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