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Spy Satellites and Other Intelligence Technologies that Changed History Paperback – April 25, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-0295986869 ISBN-10: 0295986867

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: University of Washington Press (April 25, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0295986867
  • ISBN-13: 978-0295986869
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #823,319 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This very readable and comprehensive primer..will appeal to the general reader while offering important insights for students of the larger history of the Cold War as well..Graham and Hansen have made a contribution that every reader should consider.

(The Historian)

The adage that 'good things come in small packages' certainly holds true for this book. At first glance, some readers might question whether so slender a volume has substantial value. Within the first dozen pages, however, most will recognize they are holding a real nugget.

(Air Power History)

The big topic of this little book naturally raises a host of questions.

(Seattle Times)

For those wishing to know how National Technical Means contributed to the end of the Cold War and to learn about the demands placed on them by the war against terror, Spy Satellites is an excellent place to start.

(Studies in Intelligence)

Authors Graham and Hansen have done a superior job of explaining the contributions of intelligence to strategic arms control, the downfall of the Soviet Union, and the continuing contribution to our national security. The book is a tribute to those men and women who toiled long and hard to develop sophisticated collection systems and, likewise, those analysts who turned the collected data into useable intelligence.



Based on three decades of their involvement in the front lines of arms control negotiations, Graham and Hansen are superbly qualified to analyze the critical role of satellites in space and other national technical means in monitoring compliance with arms control treaties. They do that very well in this short and authoritative book that takes the reader on an informative tour of the broad repertoire of treaties that were designed to meet requirements for effective verification and that helped stabilize the U.S.-Soviet confrontation during the Cold War.

(Sidney Drell, Hoover Institution and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center)

I could not imagine two authors better experienced to tell this important story, and to continue to tell it in more detail as declassification permits. Likewise, it is hard to come up with a better example of how good intelligence can generate the transparency which defined U.S. and Soviet stability in the latter part of the twentieth century.

From the Inside Flap

This book focuses instead on the central role that intelligence collection systems play in promoting arms control and disarmament. Graham and Hansen discuss the capabilities of technical systems and shed a much-needed light on the process of verifying how the world harnesses the proliferation of nuclear arms and the continual drive for advancements in technology.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By El Cutachero on September 29, 2008
Format: Paperback
Spy Satellites and Other Intelligence Technologies That Changed History
Back in the deepest depths of the Cold War and the "bomber gap", and the infamous "missile gap", President Eisenhower proposed to to the Soviet Union after the death of Stalin the "open skies". But since the US is an open society it was easy for USSR attaches and agents to procure all the maps and guides, they wanted, while in the Soviet Union, in which its own citizens are subject to internal passport control of their movements, all foreigners were constantly tailed and subjected to movement restriction.
Afte his proposal was summarily rejected by the paranoid Soviet leaders, Eisenhower authorized the construction of the U2 by the famous "Skunk Works" (c.f.)for the CIA. As a military commander he had made much good use of "all source" materials including the highest security ULTRA sigint. (The Bulge offensive had surprised everyone because the Germans used landlines for communication and the bad weather prevented recon aircraft from flying missions.)
During the early 50s,there were peripheral flights for sigint and some brief penetration missions from the Baltic and weather and atmospheric sampling in the Far East which revealed the soviet atomic bomb tests.
The U2 was successful but when Francis Gary Powers was shot down over the Soviet Union and survived, the world knew the truth. Though the U2 never overflew the USSR again it had a long and useful career, participating in the Cuban Missile Crisis.
The principal agency for foreign mapping in 1963 for US forces was the Army Map Service, a sub-command of the Army Corps of Engineers.
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By Rodney H Velarde on January 2, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is not what I had hoped it would be. I expected more technical details and not as much behind the scenes history
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By kclam on December 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is disappointing that this book does not cover the science of spy satellites and other intelligence technologies that changed history. It only reviews revolution of spy satellites and air reconnaissance technologies that monitor proliferation of nuclear weapons and weapons of mass destruction through various multilateral treaties. These "national technical means" also help U.S. to understand Soviet military forces and capabilities as well as guarantee a treaty's verifiability for United States. On the whole, the book is very informative.
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JUST OK. ALMOST NO MENTION OF THE KH PROGRAMS. AUTHOR EITHER NOT PRIVY TO MUCH INFO OR DIDN'T DO MUCH HOMEWORK. VERY SUPERFICIAL COVERAGE. WHEN WE TALK SATELLITES, THE U-2 PROGRAM AND AIRCRAFT AREN'T IN THE LOOP.
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